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Vera Coking

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NEWS
November 20, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Vera Coking famously refused to sell to Donald Trump. But in the end, she sold to Carl Icahn. Property records in Atlantic County show that Coking's famous but now-vacant white house, in the shadow of the famous but now-shuttered Trump Plaza, is now owned by IEH Enterprises - Icahn. The house at 127 S. Columbia Place was sold at auction in August for $583,000. At the time, Atlantic City lawyer Pat Agnellini said he was the bidder on site - and on the phone - who walked away with the winning bid. Agnellini declined to say at the time whom he represented other than himself, or what the plans were for the property.
NEWS
September 9, 1998 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vera Coking can keep her house. The Sabatinis can continue cooking spaghetti. The Banins can offer more cash for more gold. Yesterday, the court battle to seize the three properties by eminent domain for use by Donald Trump officially ended. The state Casino Reinvestment Development Authority (CRDA), following a request by Trump, voted 10-0 not to appeal a judge's ruling in July that the condemnations would be improper. "It's long overdue," said Clare Sabatini, owner of the Italian restaurant fighting off Trump.
NEWS
February 19, 1997 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vera Coking agreed to drop her lawsuit against Donald Trump yesterday and accepted a settlement of $90,000 from Trump's demolition contractor for damage to the rooming house she has long refused to sell. The settlement does not affect the longstanding battle over ownership of Coking's house on South Columbia Place, a block from Trump Plaza. Coking is still fighting a court battle to keep her home in the face of a state eminent domain action to assist Trump with the expansion of his casino.
NEWS
July 21, 1998 | By Eric Dyer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT This article contains information from the Associated Press
A judge yesterday threw out a highly criticized plan by the state to seize elderly widow Vera Coking's home and two nearby small businesses so the land could be used by casino mogul Donald Trump. Superior Court Judge Richard Williams said the attempt by the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority to take the properties for a new parking lot and a public park at Trump Plaza Hotel & Casino was flawed because it did not guarantee that the company would not later use the land simply to expand the business.
NEWS
September 10, 1998 | by Rob Laymon, For the Daily News
For now, Vera Coking gets to keep her little white guesthouse in the tumult of downtown Atlantic City. In fact, she may keep it longer than she wants. On Tuesday, the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority voted not to appeal a federal judge's ruling that Coking and two other owners could keep their properties. The ruling overturned the CRDA's attempt to condemn the lots and give them to Donald Trump, who wanted them for a casino expansion. The decision put an end to a 10-year fight among various casino developers and the gray-haired, Russia-born grandmother at Columbia Place.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - The white boardinghouse in the shadow of the Trump Plaza belonging to Vera Coking, who famously refused to sell to Donald Trump, will finally be sold Thursday - at auction. With the 91-year-old Coking now living in a nursing facility in California, and Trump Plaza headed for an expected Sept. 16 shutdown, the auction is an anticlimactic resolution of a feud that long helped to define Atlantic City. Coking's refusal to sell - either to Trump, Playboy Casino owner Bob Guccione, or the Casino Reinvestment Development Association - made her to some a triumphant symbol of the little person standing up to the casinos, but to others, an example of a local obstructionist damaging the resort.
NEWS
July 29, 1998 | By G. Richard Shell
Donald Trump is one of the world's best negotiators. Vera Coking is a slightly eccentric Atlantic City woman who has driven him to distraction by refusing to sell him the land on which her boardinghouse is built so he can expand his Trump Plaza casino. Their story is a classic study that illustrates two important lessons about negotiation. Lesson 1: Negotiation is more than haggling. People think that to be good at negotiating, you must be a great haggler. You must be smooth, bold and calculating.
NEWS
August 2, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Vera Coking finally cashed in. And like the rest of Atlantic City these days, the price came at a steep discount. The white boardinghouse that Coking could have sold for millions to Donald Trump years ago fetched $530,000 Thursday at a lackluster auction in the shadow of a now-hobbled Trump Plaza. With a 10 percent commission price, the winning bidders, Atlantic City lawyer Pat Agnellini and Stanley Realty Co., will pay $583,000 for the three-story property. Agnellini declined to identify himself at the auction except to state the obvious - that he was not representing Donald Trump.
NEWS
August 20, 2002 | By JACK KNARR Special to the Daily News
ANYONE WHO stumbled upon widow Vera Coking's old boarding house at 127 S. Columbia in Atlantic City during the 1980s and '90s knew that something very bizarre was happening there. And if you saw the place at night, with no lights on, it looked all the more macabre. You see, Vera Coking refused to sell her home to casino developer Bob Guccione, who publishes Penthouse magazine. He had bought up all the other properties in the block except a little Italian restaurant and a money-for-gold shop whose owners also refused to sell.
NEWS
February 14, 1997 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Donald Trump flew in by private 727 from the funeral for Ambassador Pamela Harriman in Washington to face the stubborn widow who has refused for a decade to sell her house to any casino mogul. Vera Coking had only a few blocks to travel to the courthouse yesterday from the crumbling three-story former boardinghouse in the shadow of Trump Plaza, where she and her daughter still manage to live. And there they sat in court, Donald and Vera, one nearly as legendary as the other, on opposite sides, taking little swipes at each other whenever possible, like a divorcing couple who are obviously never going to agree on anything.
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NEWS
November 20, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Vera Coking famously refused to sell to Donald Trump. But in the end, she sold to Carl Icahn. Property records in Atlantic County show that Coking's famous but now-vacant white house, in the shadow of the famous but now-shuttered Trump Plaza, is now owned by IEH Enterprises - Icahn. The house at 127 S. Columbia Place was sold at auction in August for $583,000. At the time, Atlantic City lawyer Pat Agnellini said he was the bidder on site - and on the phone - who walked away with the winning bid. Agnellini declined to say at the time whom he represented other than himself, or what the plans were for the property.
NEWS
August 2, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Vera Coking finally cashed in. And like the rest of Atlantic City these days, the price came at a steep discount. The white boardinghouse that Coking could have sold for millions to Donald Trump years ago fetched $530,000 Thursday at a lackluster auction in the shadow of a now-hobbled Trump Plaza. With a 10 percent commission price, the winning bidders, Atlantic City lawyer Pat Agnellini and Stanley Realty Co., will pay $583,000 for the three-story property. Agnellini declined to identify himself at the auction except to state the obvious - that he was not representing Donald Trump.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - The white boardinghouse in the shadow of the Trump Plaza belonging to Vera Coking, who famously refused to sell to Donald Trump, will finally be sold Thursday - at auction. With the 91-year-old Coking now living in a nursing facility in California, and Trump Plaza headed for an expected Sept. 16 shutdown, the auction is an anticlimactic resolution of a feud that long helped to define Atlantic City. Coking's refusal to sell - either to Trump, Playboy Casino owner Bob Guccione, or the Casino Reinvestment Development Association - made her to some a triumphant symbol of the little person standing up to the casinos, but to others, an example of a local obstructionist damaging the resort.
NEWS
May 22, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was an Atlantic City plot as familiar as a rerun on Turner Classic Movies: Homeowner vows to save house against the forces of eminent domain, played out in the shadow of a casino. It has been playing for the better part of two decades in this troubled seaside resort, since Vera Coking famously stood up to Donald Trump. But this latest version has impeccable and elegant casting. On Tuesday morning, homeowner and onetime piano prodigy turned piano tuner Charlie Birnbaum, 67, the son of Holocaust survivors, found so many ways to show just how much his three-story brick walkup building at 311 Oriental Ave., on the back side of Revel Casino Resort, means to him. He held a news conference with anti-eminent domain lawyers from the Virginia-based Institute for Justice.
NEWS
August 20, 2002 | By JACK KNARR Special to the Daily News
ANYONE WHO stumbled upon widow Vera Coking's old boarding house at 127 S. Columbia in Atlantic City during the 1980s and '90s knew that something very bizarre was happening there. And if you saw the place at night, with no lights on, it looked all the more macabre. You see, Vera Coking refused to sell her home to casino developer Bob Guccione, who publishes Penthouse magazine. He had bought up all the other properties in the block except a little Italian restaurant and a money-for-gold shop whose owners also refused to sell.
NEWS
September 10, 1998 | by Rob Laymon, For the Daily News
For now, Vera Coking gets to keep her little white guesthouse in the tumult of downtown Atlantic City. In fact, she may keep it longer than she wants. On Tuesday, the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority voted not to appeal a federal judge's ruling that Coking and two other owners could keep their properties. The ruling overturned the CRDA's attempt to condemn the lots and give them to Donald Trump, who wanted them for a casino expansion. The decision put an end to a 10-year fight among various casino developers and the gray-haired, Russia-born grandmother at Columbia Place.
NEWS
September 9, 1998 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vera Coking can keep her house. The Sabatinis can continue cooking spaghetti. The Banins can offer more cash for more gold. Yesterday, the court battle to seize the three properties by eminent domain for use by Donald Trump officially ended. The state Casino Reinvestment Development Authority (CRDA), following a request by Trump, voted 10-0 not to appeal a judge's ruling in July that the condemnations would be improper. "It's long overdue," said Clare Sabatini, owner of the Italian restaurant fighting off Trump.
NEWS
July 29, 1998 | By G. Richard Shell
Donald Trump is one of the world's best negotiators. Vera Coking is a slightly eccentric Atlantic City woman who has driven him to distraction by refusing to sell him the land on which her boardinghouse is built so he can expand his Trump Plaza casino. Their story is a classic study that illustrates two important lessons about negotiation. Lesson 1: Negotiation is more than haggling. People think that to be good at negotiating, you must be a great haggler. You must be smooth, bold and calculating.
NEWS
July 22, 1998 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maybe Donald Trump should have figured out a long time ago that Vera Coking was not easily messed with. Back before Trump Plaza had even opened, Trump had driven into a parking lot he owned on Columbia Place. A woman from across the street was minding the lot for a few moments as a favor to the attendant. "I said, 'Sir, that'll be $5 for parking,' " Coking recalled yesterday, still savoring this week's widow homeowner-vs.-casino mogul victory from inside the old summer guest house where she lives on Columbia Place.
NEWS
July 22, 1998 | by Rob Laymon, For the Daily News
In many ways, Vera Coking finally won the right to live in the past. Coking stood briefly outside her house on Columbia Place yesterday, letting photographers get pictures of her raising her arms in mock jubilation. Across the street from her lonely rooming house - the last still standing in a beach block here - car jockeys hustled autos from the Trump Plaza "pit. " Buses crowded her street. Bulldozers moved dirt for the landscaping of the new Wild West Casino. For blocks in every direction, dust from casino construction filled the air. Yet, it looks like Coking, a 70-ish widow and grandmother, will stay put for a while.
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