FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 7, 1993 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian and Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A federal court jury yesterday found that lawyer Richard Glanton sexually harassed and defamed Kathleen Frederick, an associate lawyer he supervised, but awarded her only $125,000 in damages. The jury of five men and five women deliberated about 13 hours over three days before returning with a verdict that appeared to be a compromise. Frederick was seeking more than $2 million in damages. The damages were awarded to Frederick not for the sexual harassment but for the defamation - for statements that Glanton, a former aide to Gov. Dick Thornburgh and president of the Barnes Foundation, made to reporters in January 1992 after he learned of Frederick's suit.
NEWS
August 10, 1986
The jury has spoken in the murder trial of Wilfredo Santiago. Unless or until an appeals court overturns that verdict or new evidence is produced, Wilfredo Santiago stands convicted by a jury of his peers of assassinating Philadelphia police Officer Thomas Trench as the officer sat in a patrol car early on the morning of May 28, 1985, at 17th and Spring Garden Streets. It always is risky for anyone who has not been in court for every minute of a trial to second-guess a jury - especially one that was sequestered throughout the trial.
NEWS
March 4, 2004
ICAN'T BELIEVE the jury in the Shannon Schieber case found in favor of the city. The police didn't just drop the ball in handling the "serial rapist" case, they threw the ball out of the court. While I acknowledge that a cash award would never bring Ms. Schieber back, it would have shown the city that such substandard law enforcement practices would not be tolerated. We certainly can't count on the department to discipline its own - they proved they feel themselves beyond reproach when they panned the recent report critical of their procedures.
NEWS
February 21, 2005
LET US PRAY that last week's decision by Common Pleas Judge Pamela Dembe puts an end to the right-wing cause celebre created when the district attorney's office charged antigay protesters with felonies. Let us pray that it absolves us from ever again having to say that Michael Marcavage and his Repent America group were in the right. And they were, even though the anti-gay protesters weren't participating in a protest "march," but instead were engaged in insulting people attending a fair with a city permit.
NEWS
August 18, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Thomas and Dianna Rogalski reacted bitterly to what they considered leniency given to their 17-year-old son's killer. Both left a courtroom shaken yesterday after Common Pleas Judge Renee Cardwell Hughes rejected Assistant District Attorney Jodi Lobel's request for "at best a first-degree murder verdict; at worst, second-degree murder" for the slayer of Steven Rogalski on Oct. 10, 1998. Hughes convicted Felipe Garcia, 19, of third-degree murder. She acquitted him of the higher degrees and three counts of attempted murder and robbery.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
City officials scrambled yesterday to quell rumors of an acquittal during the first day of deliberations in the trial of a Hispanic police officer charged with manslaughter in the deaths of a black motorcyclist and his passenger. A six-member jury deliberated six hours yesterday in the case of Officer William Lozano, 31, who shot to death Clement A. Lloyd, 23. Lloyd's passenger, Allan Blanchard, 24, was thrown from the motorcycle and died the next day. Lozano is charged with two counts of manslaughter and faces a maximum of 60 years in prison.
NEWS
September 18, 2008
RE COVERAGE of the shootings on the 33 Bus: You mentioned that Cornelius Kelsey had been charged with the shooting of Arnold Grissom on a 33 Bus a couple of years ago, but you failed to mention that Mr. Kelsey had been found not guilty of all charges relating to that incident, and his family would appreciate it if you would do so. Gwen Brown, Philadelphia
NEWS
April 13, 2005 | By Anthony S. Twyman and Rory Sweeney INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A day after winning a $12.8 million federal jury verdict against the city, many of the 24 remaining homeowners on the former MOVE block of Osage Avenue in West Philadelphia were resolute, if not festive. "It feels good," Gerald W. Renfrow, president of the Osage/Pine Community Association, said yesterday. "After 20 years, it's hard to jump for joy. Our lives, as we knew it, were destroyed; 1985 has continued for 20 years for us. " "We're not gloating over it," said Robert Ford, who has lived on the 6200 block of Osage Avenue - which burned after police dropped a bomb on the MOVE compound on May 13, 1985 - for more than 40 years.
NEWS
February 27, 1998
So, we have a verdict in the matter of the beef barons vs. Oprah. Sizzle trumped steak. Celebrity trumped geography. And free speech, even with an imperfect champion, trumped free enterprise. There were two verdicts, really. One came yesterday in an Amarillo courtroom, as a jury ruled several Texas cattle breeders hadn't proved Oprah Winfrey slandered and damaged their business with a 1996 show on mad cow disease. The show included a vow by the daytime diva never to eat another hamburger.
NEWS
October 19, 1988 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
It was Penn vs. Temple in the courtroom - and the prosecutor gave it the old college try. But, when push came to shove, the district attorney's blue-ribbon jury yesterday called a fight between two students a draw. The panel announced that Salvatore Infantino, 25, a Temple University dental student, was "not guilty by mutual consent" of beating Christopher Leone, 28, a student at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. Infantino had pleaded innocent to aggravated and simple assault charges.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The woman who fatally stabbed former University of Pennsylvania basketball star Matt White - his wife of 25 years - was found guilty but mentally ill Tuesday of voluntary manslaughter. Delaware County Court Judge Kevin Kelly, who presided at the nonjury trial, scheduled a February sentencing for Maria Garcia-Pellon, 54. "It's an appropriate verdict," said Thomas Bergstrom, attorney for Garcia-Pellon, who also was found guilty but mentally ill on a weapons count. Early on Feb. 11, 2013, Garcia-Pellon killed her husband as he lay sleeping in their Nether Providence Township home.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
STUDENTS AT THREE city magnet high schools staged a die-in yesterday to protest recent grand-jury decisions in Ferguson, Mo., and New York City, involving black men killed by white police officers. Students at Masterman, Central and Science Leadership Academy all lay on the floor for 4 minutes, 30 seconds to mark the 4 hours, 30 minutes that Michael Brown's body was left on the ground after being shot by Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson. Organizers said the schools began to plan the events independently, but then coordinated them - although carried them out at different times - to send a strong message.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Opposing counsel and experts agreed that Maria Garcia-Pellon was mentally ill when she killed her husband, former University of Pennsylvania basketball star Matt White, and the judge said Wednesday the state's evidence "does not allow for a guilty verdict" on the first- or third-degree murder counts. Delaware County Court Judge Kevin Kelly did not issue a decision and deferred any verdict in the nonjury trial until Tuesday. But beyond the first- and third-degree charges the remaining options would be not guilty, not guilty by reason of insanity, guilty but mentally ill of voluntary manslaughter, or guilty but mentally ill of first-degree murder.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Dylan Purcell and Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writers
In a split verdict, a former Philadelphia police officer was acquitted Friday of falsely imprisoning a man in Center City last year. Kevin Corcoran was also found not guilty on charges of official oppression, but the jury found him guilty of a misdemeanor charge of obstruction. Corcoran, who was a 10-year veteran, sat quietly in the courtroom in a dark-blue suit while jurors deliberated into the afternoon over charges that he handcuffed and improperly detained Roderick King of Lansdale, an Air Force veteran.
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano and Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writers
A Common Pleas Court jury Monday found former Philadelphia Police Officer Richard DeCoatsworth not guilty of aggravated assault on a longtime girlfriend. The jury found DeCoatsworth not guilty of recklessly endangering another person, but guilty of simple assault. DeCoatsworth, 28, dressed in a black suit and burgundy dress shirt, was stoic as the verdict was announced, and smiled as he hugged family members. He declined to describe how the felt about the verdict, but said he and his family were confident that the aggravated assault charge "was never going to be an issue.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Montgomery County Court jury awarded $124 million Wednesday to the estate of Ellen Gregory Robb, who was murdered by her husband almost eight years ago in their Upper Merion home. Jurors in the wrongful death suit against Rafael Robb, a former University of Pennsylvania economics professor who beat his wife to death with a metal bar just before Christmas 2006, deliberated for five hours before returning a unanimous verdict that attorneys said would leave Robb penniless when he is released from prison.
NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Montgomery County Court jury on Thursday convicted a King of Prussia man of first-degree murder in the killings of a grandmother and 10-month-old girl, a case that prosecutors said began as a kidnapping plot and spiraled quickly into brutal violence. Raghunandan Yandamuri, 28, a former information-technology worker who came to the United States from India on a work visa, faces the possibility of the death penalty for the 2012 stabbing of Satayrathi Venna, 61, and suffocation of her granddaughter, Saanvi Venna.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
After deliberating for close to six hours Wednesday, a Montgomery County Court jury did not reach a verdict in the case of a King of Prussia man accused of murdering a grandmother and a 10-month-old baby girl, in what prosecutors called a kidnapping plot gone bad. If convicted, Raghunandan Yandamuri, a 28-year-old former information technology worker who came to the United States from India on a work visa, could face the death penalty in the 2012...
NEWS
October 2, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
MOB ASSOCIATE Ronald Galati sat calmly as a jury convicted him of hiring hit men to kill his daughter's lover - a verdict handed down only an hour after the jury told the judge they were deadlocked yesterday afternoon in federal court in Camden. Galati, 63, a South Philadelphia auto-body shop owner, was found guilty of murder-for-hire, conspiracy to commit murder-for-hire and related firearms offenses. Looking resigned after the verdict was read, Galati stood, waved goodbye to his family and was handcuffed and remanded to prison.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|