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Verdict

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NEWS
August 7, 1993 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian and Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A federal court jury yesterday found that lawyer Richard Glanton sexually harassed and defamed Kathleen Frederick, an associate lawyer he supervised, but awarded her only $125,000 in damages. The jury of five men and five women deliberated about 13 hours over three days before returning with a verdict that appeared to be a compromise. Frederick was seeking more than $2 million in damages. The damages were awarded to Frederick not for the sexual harassment but for the defamation - for statements that Glanton, a former aide to Gov. Dick Thornburgh and president of the Barnes Foundation, made to reporters in January 1992 after he learned of Frederick's suit.
NEWS
August 10, 1986
The jury has spoken in the murder trial of Wilfredo Santiago. Unless or until an appeals court overturns that verdict or new evidence is produced, Wilfredo Santiago stands convicted by a jury of his peers of assassinating Philadelphia police Officer Thomas Trench as the officer sat in a patrol car early on the morning of May 28, 1985, at 17th and Spring Garden Streets. It always is risky for anyone who has not been in court for every minute of a trial to second-guess a jury - especially one that was sequestered throughout the trial.
NEWS
March 4, 2004
ICAN'T BELIEVE the jury in the Shannon Schieber case found in favor of the city. The police didn't just drop the ball in handling the "serial rapist" case, they threw the ball out of the court. While I acknowledge that a cash award would never bring Ms. Schieber back, it would have shown the city that such substandard law enforcement practices would not be tolerated. We certainly can't count on the department to discipline its own - they proved they feel themselves beyond reproach when they panned the recent report critical of their procedures.
NEWS
February 21, 2005
LET US PRAY that last week's decision by Common Pleas Judge Pamela Dembe puts an end to the right-wing cause celebre created when the district attorney's office charged antigay protesters with felonies. Let us pray that it absolves us from ever again having to say that Michael Marcavage and his Repent America group were in the right. And they were, even though the anti-gay protesters weren't participating in a protest "march," but instead were engaged in insulting people attending a fair with a city permit.
NEWS
August 18, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Thomas and Dianna Rogalski reacted bitterly to what they considered leniency given to their 17-year-old son's killer. Both left a courtroom shaken yesterday after Common Pleas Judge Renee Cardwell Hughes rejected Assistant District Attorney Jodi Lobel's request for "at best a first-degree murder verdict; at worst, second-degree murder" for the slayer of Steven Rogalski on Oct. 10, 1998. Hughes convicted Felipe Garcia, 19, of third-degree murder. She acquitted him of the higher degrees and three counts of attempted murder and robbery.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
City officials scrambled yesterday to quell rumors of an acquittal during the first day of deliberations in the trial of a Hispanic police officer charged with manslaughter in the deaths of a black motorcyclist and his passenger. A six-member jury deliberated six hours yesterday in the case of Officer William Lozano, 31, who shot to death Clement A. Lloyd, 23. Lloyd's passenger, Allan Blanchard, 24, was thrown from the motorcycle and died the next day. Lozano is charged with two counts of manslaughter and faces a maximum of 60 years in prison.
NEWS
September 18, 2008
RE COVERAGE of the shootings on the 33 Bus: You mentioned that Cornelius Kelsey had been charged with the shooting of Arnold Grissom on a 33 Bus a couple of years ago, but you failed to mention that Mr. Kelsey had been found not guilty of all charges relating to that incident, and his family would appreciate it if you would do so. Gwen Brown, Philadelphia
NEWS
April 13, 2005 | By Anthony S. Twyman and Rory Sweeney INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A day after winning a $12.8 million federal jury verdict against the city, many of the 24 remaining homeowners on the former MOVE block of Osage Avenue in West Philadelphia were resolute, if not festive. "It feels good," Gerald W. Renfrow, president of the Osage/Pine Community Association, said yesterday. "After 20 years, it's hard to jump for joy. Our lives, as we knew it, were destroyed; 1985 has continued for 20 years for us. " "We're not gloating over it," said Robert Ford, who has lived on the 6200 block of Osage Avenue - which burned after police dropped a bomb on the MOVE compound on May 13, 1985 - for more than 40 years.
NEWS
February 27, 1998
So, we have a verdict in the matter of the beef barons vs. Oprah. Sizzle trumped steak. Celebrity trumped geography. And free speech, even with an imperfect champion, trumped free enterprise. There were two verdicts, really. One came yesterday in an Amarillo courtroom, as a jury ruled several Texas cattle breeders hadn't proved Oprah Winfrey slandered and damaged their business with a 1996 show on mad cow disease. The show included a vow by the daytime diva never to eat another hamburger.
NEWS
October 19, 1988 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
It was Penn vs. Temple in the courtroom - and the prosecutor gave it the old college try. But, when push came to shove, the district attorney's blue-ribbon jury yesterday called a fight between two students a draw. The panel announced that Salvatore Infantino, 25, a Temple University dental student, was "not guilty by mutual consent" of beating Christopher Leone, 28, a student at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. Infantino had pleaded innocent to aggravated and simple assault charges.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITER
A Montgomery County jury on Tuesday convicted a Philadelphia man in the murder of his ex-girlfriend's father, but acquitted a friend who also was on trial for the September home-invasion. Naadir Abdul-Ali, 21, will serve a mandatory life sentence for his conviction of second-degree murder in the killing of Kevin Brown, of Lower Moreland Township. Co-defendant Desmond Smith, 21, also of Philadelphia, walked smiling from the courtroom after he was acquitted of all charges. During the 11-day trial Smith's attorney presented an alibi defense and video footage from SEPTA's Market-Frankford line, suggesting that Smith was riding the train at the time of the murder.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
A Philadelphia jury found Friday that the antipsychotic drug Risperdal caused a Tennessee boy to grow breasts and imposed a $70 million verdict on its manufacturer, Janssen Pharmaceuticals. Lawyers for the boy argued that scientists for the company were well aware of the risks and sought to downplay them. The company disputed that allegation during the Common Pleas Court trial and said that physicians were fully informed of potential side effects. It was the fifth Risperdal lawsuit tried in Philadelphia, and by far the largest verdict so far. Earlier verdicts ranged from $500,000 to $2.2 million.
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
A Chester County lawyer accused of withholding medical care from his 92-year-old father and causing his death was found guilty Thursday of third-degree murder. After deliberating for more than 10 hours, a jury found Edward J. O'Brien III, 61, guilty of all charges - including aggravated assault, involuntary manslaughter, and reckless endangerment - in the 2013 death of Edward J. O'Brien Jr. This was the second trial for the West Whiteland Township man. A jury deadlocked on all charges in February.
NEWS
June 30, 2016 | By Steve Bohnel, Staff Writer
A federal jury Tuesday convicted a Levittown doctor accused of running a multimillion-dollar pill mill with help from the Pagans Motorcycle Club of drug, money-laundering, bankruptcy-fraud, and other charges. During 23 days of testimony, the government questioned strippers, former patients, investigators, and Pagans members, all of whom said that William J. O'Brien was a drug dealer who illegally prescribed painkillers. O'Brien contended that nearly everyone was lying. He called out U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Special Agent Joshua Gill multiple times for not knowing that opioids could be used for headaches.
NEWS
June 25, 2016
ISSUE | POLITICAL CORRUPTION Cronies backed Fattah even after verdict Almost as unsurprising as the conviction of U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah (D., Pa.) on all 22 counts of fraud, money-laundering, and bribery was the reaction of the political clerisy ("Reaction: Heavy hearts, calls to quit," Wednesday). Not one of Fattah's Democratic colleagues called for his resignation; that reasonable response to the jury's verdict was left to Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, a group that, as confirmed by the Inquirer's "Philadelphia Political Hall of Shame," should never be confused with the capos who run Philadelphia's Democratic Party.
NEWS
June 16, 2016
Jurors in U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah's federal corruption ended their first full day of deliberations on Thursday without reaching a verdict. U.S. District Judge Harvey Bartle III dismissed the panel of four men and eight women around 4 p.m., about an hour earlier than he usually ends the court day. Jurors are set to return Friday to continue their discussions. Fattah, 59, stands accused of accepting bribes and stealing charitable donations, campaign contributions, and federal grant funds under his control to pay off his personal and political debts.
NEWS
June 12, 2016 | By Daniel Block, Staff Writer
A jury on Friday convicted a Sudanese refugee of first-degree murder in the stabbing death of a coworker at a Montgomery County meatpacking plant. The jury also found Peter Jok Atem, 34, of Lansdale, guilty of possession of an instrument of crime in the slaying of Danny Vasquez, 25, of Philadelphia, with a 41/2-inch butterfly knife on a frigid day in February 2015. "We're all very grateful," said Jason Vasquez, the victim's brother. Of his brother, who had 3-, 7-, and 10-year-old children, he said that "all he wanted to do was work and provide for his family.
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
The long-standing custom of giving Philadelphia City Council members complete control over land use in their districts, known as councilmanic prerogative, took a beating in federal court Wednesday when a jury said it was used by a Council member to punish a political foe. Developer Ori Feibush had accused Councilman Kenyatta Johnson of blocking his attempts to buy two city-owned lots after he announced plans to run against Johnson in the 2015 Democratic...
NEWS
May 4, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
Twenty-seven years after the bodies of Ruby Ellis and Cheryl Hanible were found strangled and in squalor, a Philadelphia jury on Monday said Rudolph Churchill was the man who killed them. Churchill, 54, of Paulsboro, was found guilty of two counts of first-degree murder and two weapons counts involving the twine and shoelace used to strangle the women. But the jury acquitted the Gloucester County man of two counts of rape and two counts of involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, an apparent acknowledgment that none of Churchill's DNA was found on or in the bodies of Ellis and Hanible.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
A federal jury on Wednesday found two leaders of the defunct Nova Financial Holding Inc. guilty of a scheme to defraud the U.S. Treasury Department's bank bailout program in 2009. Prosecutors charged that Barry R. Bekkedam, the bank's founding chairman, and Brian M. Hartline, its chief executive, orchestrated a series of fraudulent loans to customers who would then invest the money back into Nova in a bid to qualify for $13.5 million in federal bank bailout funds. The scheme fell apart after the treasury department rescinded its offer of bailout money for unrelated reasons.
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