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NEWS
September 5, 2006 | DEBORAH LEAVY
I WASN'T GOING to write a column this week. Our son's weeklong visit with friends down the shore would be giving my husband and me some time for ourselves, a little vacation. But instead of driving up to Bucks County for the day, or even going out to lunch with my hubby, I'm spending at least some of that time waiting for the Verizon guy to show up. It happens to everyone. And if it's not the phone, it's the refrigerator, or the toilet, or you need the exterminator. If you don't live in an apartment with an extremely nice super, you're stuck waiting, and probably have to take a day off from work.
NEWS
August 16, 2011
Striking Verizon Communications Inc. employees will lose their health benefits if they don't return to work by the end of the month, Verizon company spokesman Rich Young said. The Communications Workers of America, which is representing most of the 45,000 workers on strike, said a special union fund will be able to help members cover some of their benefits, CWA spokeswoman Candice Johnson said. The strike began Aug. 7.     - Jane M. Von Bergen
BUSINESS
December 10, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Let's pause for a moment to remember the Internet as we know it. That Internet could soon be gone - in favor of something more like cable TV - if Verizon and MetroPCS Communications get their way in a fight with the Federal Communications Commission. If that sounds a touch alarmist, the two network owners are making some alarming claims in a dispute they have taken to the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals - above all that, as network owners, they have a First Amendment right to exercise "editorial discretion" over their portions of the Internet, much like a newspaper.
NEWS
December 23, 2008
RE TOM SPEYER'S letter: "Please, Council, approve FIOS. " Tom is not alone in the struggle with Comcast. Comcast holds the residents of this city over the coals and pretty much does and charges as it wants because there is no competition. Competition is healthy and I bet Comcast will feel the loss if Verizon is allowed to bring FIOS to Philadelphia. Dish service is not comparable to cable. Maybe the Daily News can start a campaign to get the residents to write members of City Council on this issue.
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | By Murray Dubin
My con­test with the twin pterodactyls of Phila­del­phia has not been pret­ty. They have bloodied me. My wife, Libby, was ripped apart, too. My ad­vice for fu­ture combatants: Lie down, as­sume the fe­tal po­si­tion, and hope for the best. And make sure your children are safe. Com­cast and Ve­ri­zon are a for­mi­da­ble cor­po­rate tag team. They beat you with scripted ap­o­lo­gies, in­com­pe­tence, and broken promises. Here is what happened: We have Ve­ri­zon for phone and In­ter­net ser­vice and Com­cast for the tele­vi­sion.
NEWS
March 22, 2001 | Daily News Staff Report
Your phone book has a new look. And it's going to get even newer. Besides the new name on the front - Verizon - you'll notice that surnames in the white pages are printed only once at the beginning of the listings. So, instead of encountering seven pages of Smiths, with the name endlessly repeated, for instance, you'll find Smith printed once at the top of the columns and under it those with that last name, i.e., Adam, Alex, April. . . They call it "surname suppression.
NEWS
January 20, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philip Alan Bulliner, 67, a former Philadelphia lawyer and Verizon executive, died of heart failure Tuesday, Jan. 11, at Kindred Hospital in Wayne, N.J. Mr. Bulliner was born in Silver Spring, Md., and graduated from Montgomery Blair High School there in 1961. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry at Lehigh University in 1965, where he earned the Alfred P. Sloan Scholar and the Scott Paper Co. Scholar awards. He was a member of the Lehigh varsity basketball team and the Theta Chi fraternity.
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Ernest McCauley, a retired supervisor for Verizon and a personal fitness trainer, died Saturday. He was 55 and lived in Plymouth Meeting. Known as "Ernie," McCauley had worked for the company for 20 years and retired about a month ago as a supervising senior auditor. He was a licensed electrician with the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers and a certified personal fitness trainer. "He was a devoted husband," said his wife of 31 years and childhood sweetheart, the former Paula Flamer.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three wall-size video schedule boards for Regional Rail passengers in Suburban Station are the centerpiece of a $7 million deal between SEPTA and Verizon. SEPTA unveiled the schedule boards and a new Verizon retail store in the station Friday. SEPTA will receive $4.55 million over three years in the advertising deal, with two three-year options that could bring the nine-year total to $15.6 million, SEPTA spokesman Andrew Busch said. In addition, SEPTA's advertising agency, Titan Outdoor L.L.C., will receive $2.45 million from Verizon for the first three years, and $8.40 million over the nine-year span.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
The odds-on favorite for this week's Big News in Technology was expected to emerge from San Francisco, site of Apple's annual Worldwide Developers Conference. Although Apple could surely turn more heads over the next two days, a longshot has taken the lead: Verizon's new scheme for putting a price tag on wireless data. Consider the big picture, and you'll see how these stories are linked. On the Left Coast, Apple is busily trying to hook you on the latest in mobile technology.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 1, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the rollout of FiOS nearing an end, the working-class residents of Laurel Springs, Somerdale, and Lindenwold wonder whether they will ever get to enjoy the latest Internet and TV products of Verizon Communications Inc. So far, Verizon has wired Cherry Hill and Haddonfield - more affluent communities - and county seat Camden for fiber-based Internet and TV. The telecom giant, in fact, has run FiOS through most of Camden County. For a complete map of the coverage area click here.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Verizon Communications Inc., which plans to launch a national video-streaming service this year, said Tuesday that it is buying AOL Inc. for $4.4 billion. AOL owns such digital brands as Mapquest, Huffington Post, and TechCrunch, and has developed online advertising platforms that could benefit Verizon's new streaming service, analysts say. The deal - which will likely face regulatory hurdles in Washington - will need to be approved by the Federal Trade Commission or the U.S. Department of Justice.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Verizon's FiOS TV service has dropped the Weather Channel and replaced it with the just-launched AccuWeather Network, seeking to cut programming costs, Verizon said on Tuesday. "This was a decision to opt-out and not carry the Weather Channel," said Verizon spokesman Lee Gierczynski. In late 2013 and early 2014, DirecTV temporarily dropped the Weather Channel in a carriage dispute over the channel's costs and programming. DirecTV said the channel had abandoned some of its core weather programs that were popular with subscribers for reality shows to boost TV ratings.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Verizon Communications Inc. officials look at national customer satisfaction ratings, they have a tongue-in-cheek term to describe their position relative to industry peers - "queen of the pigs. " Time Warner Cable Inc., AT&T Inc., Cox Communications, Charter Communications, Comcast Corp., and Verizon have had poor reputations for solving customer problems for years. But Verizon rates higher than the average telecommunications giant and is near the top of the industry sector.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission moved Thursday to deregulate prices for Verizon's landline phone service in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and three other regions - a decision that could lead to sizable price jumps for customers, who pay about $22 a month for traditional local phone service. By a 3-2 vote that drew sharp dissents from the commission's two Democratic appointees, the PUC partly backed Verizon's October petition, which asked that its service be declared "competitive" in the five markets under a 2004 state law that sought to promote phone and Internet competition.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra has a rather plastic idea of the concert format these days. On Wednesday night, that meant a hybrid of the talk-and-play concerts it has done under various names over the last two decades, plus offering the LiveNote app that allows the audience to follow real-time program notes on mobile devices. The start time was earlier than usual (6:30 p.m.), and tickets a flat $45 for an intermission-less concert of about 75 minutes. It would be hard to say the format struck a chord with ticket buyers, given the audience in the low hundreds that turned out in Verizon Hall.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three wall-size video schedule boards for Regional Rail passengers in Suburban Station are the centerpiece of a $7 million deal between SEPTA and Verizon. SEPTA unveiled the schedule boards and a new Verizon retail store in the station Friday. SEPTA will receive $4.55 million over three years in the advertising deal, with two three-year options that could bring the nine-year total to $15.6 million, SEPTA spokesman Andrew Busch said. In addition, SEPTA's advertising agency, Titan Outdoor L.L.C., will receive $2.45 million from Verizon for the first three years, and $8.40 million over the nine-year span.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Who's responsible when a delivery goes awry? That's been an issue for some luckless consumers at least since the days when Sears, Roebuck & Co. pioneered mail order a century ago, and likely for clients of the Pony Express before that. Recently, it has gained urgency from the growth of delivery-dependent Internet commerce. One day, it may even be an issue when Amazon's drones target the wrong front stoop for a package drop. The key thing to remember is that delivery systems endure because, almost always, they work as promised.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
It used to be we would go to the orchestra to avoid commercialism. Now, audiences are paying good money to be pitched to. Playing excerpts from the scores of Pixar films on two nights in Verizon Hall last week, the Philadelphia Orchestra set aside its charge of letting the public in on something interesting, overlooked, or artistically important. Instead, the ensemble played for two hours beneath a screen showing clips from Toy Story ( 1 , 2 and 3 ), Monsters Inc ., Cars ( 1 and 2 )
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some PATCO train riders will be able to use cellphones in underground stations and tunnels later this year, following approval Wednesday by the PATCO board of a contract to install cellular transmission equipment. The nearly $300,000 contract with Verizon Wireless initially will allow only Verizon customers to connect. But AT&T has expressed interest in installing transmission equipment for its customers and those of other cellphone carriers, said John Rink, general manager of PATCO.
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