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Verizon Hall

NEWS
April 19, 2013
FAMILY Maps at Winterthur A few years back, Miss Teen South Carolina famously said, "Some people out there in our nation don't have maps. " Not so at this Wilmington-area museum, where more than 100 rare objects form a new exhibition, "Common Destinations: Maps in the American Experience. " 5105 Kennett Pike (Route 52), Winterthur, Del., through Jan. 5, $5-$18, 302-888-4600, winterthur.org. Jimmy and Johari Rollins You knew they were passionate about physical fitness, baseball, politics and Camryn, their 11-month-old daughter.
NEWS
April 8, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia migrated for the first time in its own subscription series Sunday from its usual Perelman Theater quarters to the larger Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center, and with good reason: Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 . It's a piece that needs more room. Also significant, conductor laureate Ignat Solzhenitsyn (a much-seasoned Beethovenian) returned to conduct a smaller-scale, gently provocative performance that reminded you how seldom the composer's grandest symphony is heard with fine nuances.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
When composer Eric Whitacre launched his East Coast tour Monday, he received such a rock-star greeting that he wondered whether he should have a stack of amplifiers and a mean-sounding Stratocaster. "I felt a little guilty," he says. "I wanted to have something to meet that young energy. " Instead, he conducted 30-plus singers in Monteverdi and his own trademark ethereal tones, which many listeners drove considerable distances to hear at the Strathmore concert hall near Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
The concept that unlocks the possibilities of time travel may remain obscure. But what we now know about time machines is that they take up a lot of space. One such specimen landed Monday morning in the lobby of the Kimmel Center as workers began assembling an enormous "interactive" time machine to be the centerpiece of the Kimmel's upcoming arts festival. With its time-travel theme, the 2013 Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts will frame performances and other events with time-related exhibits and activities experienced in the 100-foot-long cylinder.
NEWS
September 1, 2012 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
It can take time for a new building to work out all the kinks, even when the architecture is very good. In the case of Rafael Viñoly's Kimmel Center, which falls well short of that mark, the tweaking has been going on for more than a decade. In the last year, the Broad Street performing arts center has finally begun to set things right, starting with the acoustics in its Verizon Hall. The Kimmel hopes to cross another big headache off its list Tuesday, when it reopens the dramatic, but brutally hot, rooftop terrace on top of its Perelman Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2012 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
There's something slightly demystifying about seeing Dead Can Dance in the flesh. Under headphones, the duo of Lisa Gerrard and Brendan Perry can sound like timeless, ethereal nomads haunting some otherworldly caravanserai. On stage, their arsenal of exotic sounds is realized as a few synths and a handful of percussion instruments, and the passage of time is evident in Perry's graying goatee, if not in his still-rich baritone. The spell didn't seem to be broken for the audience gathered in Verizon Hall on Sunday night, however.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. - "It's a small world, and it all comes together in Saratoga. " So said a faintly bemused Yannick Nézet-Séguin last week. Only while discussing his Saratoga concert lineup did the Philadelphia Orchestra's music director-designate realize he'd brought together talent from the current coordinate points of his career - London, Montreal, Salzburg, and Philadelphia - for an intensive trio of concerts during the orchestra's three-week residency here, which ends Saturday.
NEWS
June 30, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
After becoming the first major U.S. orchestra to file under Chapter 11 14½ months ago, the Philadelphia Orchestra Association is leaving bankruptcy. On Thursday, U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge Eric L. Frank approved the orchestra's reorganization plan, which drew no opposition at a hearing attended by most of the major interested parties. His action clears the way for full emergence from bankruptcy by the end of July. About $5.5 million will be distributed to creditors based on a sliding-scale formula.
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