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Versailles

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REAL_ESTATE
January 21, 1996 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Versailles at Europa, Cherry Hill, Camden County What appears to be one of the most standard feature at Versailles at Europa - the Orleans Co.'s development of townhouses in Cherry Hill - is the availability of un-standard variations. "And we were extremely pleased with the builder, who was very cooperative with the changes we wanted to make in our house," said Barbara Shiroff, who has lived at Versailles with her husband, Harry, since last May. Their home, an Evian design, is not even one of the standard designs offered at Versailles.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Developer Leo Addimando 's Alterra Property Group , which owns apartments in Center City and Manayunk, has big changes planned for the 104-unit Versailles apartments at 1530 Locust St., which it acquired and began running last week. Alterra replaces Carlyle Property Management . "That building is a jewel. It needs a facelift. We are going to be investing in capital improvements, starting sometime in 2015. It will be done slowly," Addimando told me. That means higher rents, which Philadelphia apartment-dwellers have gotten used to lately.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Actor Alan Rickman helms A Little Chaos , his second film as a director, with Kate Winslet as a royal landscaper helping to design the vast gardens of Versailles in the court of King Louis XIV (played by Rickman himself). Winslet's powerhouse performances holds up A Little Chaos , a movie that cannot necessarily support her inherent force. She plays Sabine de Barra, a fictional landscaper employed by André le Nôtre, mastermind behind Versailles' gardens. Matthias Schoenaerts, as le Nôtre, is getting mileage out of costume drama this summer: He also stars in the Thomas Hardy adaptation Far From the Madding Crowd . De Barra's life is not the only fudged part of history.
NEWS
September 3, 1989 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
In this land of powerful cultural icons, can there be a more potent symbol of French excess - for good and evil - than the 17th-century chateau that dominates this town of 100,000? Forget all the hype you've heard this year about the French Revolution's bicentennial and stirring re-enactments of the storming of the Bastille. If you want to ride on the road to revolution, skulk the tapestried corridors of power, reflect in the mirrors of the world's most beautiful ballroom, and stand your ground where the rabble once roused, then by all means visit Versailles.
REAL_ESTATE
May 14, 1999 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
You can best experience the old-world elegance of the Versailles a step at a time. First, step back to appreciate the Versailles' neo-classical architecture, designed in the Beaux Arts tradition. Constructed in 1920 by Philadelphia architect Frederick Webber (who, 10 years later, designed 1830 Rittenhouse Square, the first apartment building on the square), the 15-story, historically certified building at the corner of Locust and 16th Streets carries the signature of its time in its ornate cornices, towering bays (known as Chicago-style windows)
NEWS
March 17, 1986 | By Francie Scott, Special to The Inquirer
From 1916 until 1980, one of the grandest houses in Pennsylvania was a sprawling 447-room Georgian mansion in Wyndmoor called Whitemarsh Hall. The ornate rooms, extravagant furnishings and French-style formal gardens earned it the title "the Versailles of America," but to Springfield Township residents, it was simply the Stotesbury Estate, named for its owner, financier Edward Townsend Stotesbury. The mansion that took five years to build was demolished in two weeks in the spring of 1980, leaving a belvedere, a retaining wall and a few damaged statues.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
In her book The Battle of Versailles , Robin Givhan whisks readers back to an electric night in 1973 when five emerging American fashion designers bested their French counterparts . The 306-page tome, published by Flatiron Books, recounts how the industry's then-underdogs - Oscar de la Renta, Anne Klein, Bill Blass, Stephen Burrows, and Roy Halston Frowick (simply known as Halston) - surprisingly triumphed in a fashion show competition and fund-raiser that would benefit the crumbling Versailles palace.
NEWS
July 5, 2007
It's often said that "art belongs to all of us. " Nice sentiment. But ownership is more than enjoyment. When art needs to be spruced up, who is responsible? In France, they answer: All of us. Let's get it done, however we can. On June 25, after $16 million and three years of painstaking craft, the Hall of Mirrors at the Palace of Versailles was fully reopened. Louis XIV, the "Sun King," had it built from 1678 to 1684 as a monument to . . . well, himself. It's 960 square yards, huge windows on one side, 357 mirrors on the other.
REAL_ESTATE
January 23, 1994 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Versailles, Cherry Hill, Camden County Both builder and buyers are digging a little deeper at Versailles, the Orleans Co.'s new townhouse community in Cherry Hill where basements have become standard. In fact, all of the remaining 80 houses (out of 102) at Versailles will be built with full basements. Homes that back up to a wooded area will have walk-out basements. "We were originally offering the townhouses with or without basements," said Del Purscell, executive vice present of sales and marketing for Orleans.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2012 | By Gary Thompson and Daily News Staff Writer
A FEW YEARS AGO, filmmaker/photographer Lauren Greenfield took a picture of a rich lady's purse that ended up hailed by Time magazine as one of the best photos of the year. The purse belonged to a woman named Jackie Siegel, who mentioned that she was in the process of building a Versailles-inspired home that would be the biggest house in America — 90,000 square feet. That's the house, not America. "I knew that was a movie I wanted to make," said Greenfield, who is also in the midst of an ongoing photography project aimed at wealth and consumerism during what she considered the country's new Gilded Age. She persuaded Jackie and husband David (a real estate mogul)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Actor Alan Rickman helms A Little Chaos , his second film as a director, with Kate Winslet as a royal landscaper helping to design the vast gardens of Versailles in the court of King Louis XIV (played by Rickman himself). Winslet's powerhouse performances holds up A Little Chaos , a movie that cannot necessarily support her inherent force. She plays Sabine de Barra, a fictional landscaper employed by André le Nôtre, mastermind behind Versailles' gardens. Matthias Schoenaerts, as le Nôtre, is getting mileage out of costume drama this summer: He also stars in the Thomas Hardy adaptation Far From the Madding Crowd . De Barra's life is not the only fudged part of history.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
In her book The Battle of Versailles , Robin Givhan whisks readers back to an electric night in 1973 when five emerging American fashion designers bested their French counterparts . The 306-page tome, published by Flatiron Books, recounts how the industry's then-underdogs - Oscar de la Renta, Anne Klein, Bill Blass, Stephen Burrows, and Roy Halston Frowick (simply known as Halston) - surprisingly triumphed in a fashion show competition and fund-raiser that would benefit the crumbling Versailles palace.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Developer Leo Addimando 's Alterra Property Group , which owns apartments in Center City and Manayunk, has big changes planned for the 104-unit Versailles apartments at 1530 Locust St., which it acquired and began running last week. Alterra replaces Carlyle Property Management . "That building is a jewel. It needs a facelift. We are going to be investing in capital improvements, starting sometime in 2015. It will be done slowly," Addimando told me. That means higher rents, which Philadelphia apartment-dwellers have gotten used to lately.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2012
Easy Money A great gangster pic from Sweden, with Joel Kinnaman (Holder in The Killing) as a hustling economics major trying to insinuate himself into the moneyed Stockholm crowd - and hatching a plan to launder drug money to pay his way. A sinister scrum of Albanians, Bosnians, Russians, and Serbs complicate things big time. R The Queen of Versailles Jaw-dropping documentary profile of Jackie and David Siegel, the Floridians who made billions in the time-share business and then watched it all fall apart in the crash of 2008.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2012 | By Gary Thompson and Daily News Staff Writer
A FEW YEARS AGO, filmmaker/photographer Lauren Greenfield took a picture of a rich lady's purse that ended up hailed by Time magazine as one of the best photos of the year. The purse belonged to a woman named Jackie Siegel, who mentioned that she was in the process of building a Versailles-inspired home that would be the biggest house in America — 90,000 square feet. That's the house, not America. "I knew that was a movie I wanted to make," said Greenfield, who is also in the midst of an ongoing photography project aimed at wealth and consumerism during what she considered the country's new Gilded Age. She persuaded Jackie and husband David (a real estate mogul)
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
MIAMI, Fla. - Any serious Republican candidate trolling for votes in Florida is bound, at some point, to make the pilgrimage to Versailles. The restaurant in the heart of Little Havana is the town square of Miami's Cubano community. Like Philadelphia's Geno's or the Famous Deli, it is where politicians go to get down with the people and pose with the specialty of the house. Instead of cheesesteaks and Reubens, here it's the coffee, served thick and sweet as the political rhetoric.
NEWS
October 28, 2011
If you're a student or admirer of the duPonts, there's a new book to lighten the long winter's darkness. It's called Nemours: A Portrait of Alfred I. duPont's House, by Dwight Young and Grace Gary, with photos by Sisse Brimberg and Cotton Coulson (Rizzoli International Publications, $40). It took three sherpas 30 minutes to haul these 307 pages upstairs to my third-floor desk at The Inquirer. Just kidding. But this is one hefty love letter to "a true American original and the Delaware estate he called Nemours.
NEWS
July 5, 2007
It's often said that "art belongs to all of us. " Nice sentiment. But ownership is more than enjoyment. When art needs to be spruced up, who is responsible? In France, they answer: All of us. Let's get it done, however we can. On June 25, after $16 million and three years of painstaking craft, the Hall of Mirrors at the Palace of Versailles was fully reopened. Louis XIV, the "Sun King," had it built from 1678 to 1684 as a monument to . . . well, himself. It's 960 square yards, huge windows on one side, 357 mirrors on the other.
NEWS
March 26, 2004 | By Sheila Dyan FOR THE INQUIRER
Philadelphia is well-equipped to satisfy the varied tastes of apartment dwellers, since it offers rentals in structures dating from the mid-19th century to the late 20th century. Some were originally constructed as residential properties, others metamorphosed from office buildings, manufacturing plants, warehouses, even a slaughterhouse. Yet for renters seeking the charm of old-world architecture and ambience, the Versailles, at the corner of 16th and Locust Streets, is on the short list.
NEWS
June 11, 2000 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Whitemarsh Hall was completed in 1921 in the Wyndmoor section of Springfield Township, it was popularly called the Versailles of America. Some say the mansion was built as a monument to the life and work of its owner, Edward T. Stotesbury. But Ed Zwicker of the Springfield Township Historical Society has his own ideas about the reason Whitemarsh Hall was built. "The entire estate was used by Stotesbury's second wife, Eva, as a passport into the select society of Philadelphia," Zwicker said in a recent interview.
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