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March 3, 2005 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Baseball's veterans committee kept the door to the Hall of Fame closed for the second straight time, leaving Gil Hodges and Ron Santo on the outside and raising doubts about whether anyone can gain election. Hodges and Santo fell eight votes shy of the necessary 75 percent, with each appearing on 52 ballots (65 percent) in totals announced yesterday. Tony Oliva (45) and Jim Kaat (43) were the only other players chosen on more than half the 80 ballots. The revamped committee, which includes all living members of the Hall, does not meet again until 2007.
SPORTS
March 10, 1986 | Daily News Wire Service
Daily News columnist and former Phillies star Richie Ashburn is among a group of candidates who will be considered for enshrinement to Baseball's Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee. Also among those to be considered as possible inductees are former Yankees shortstop Phil Rizzuto, Boston second baseman Bobby Doerr and former National League umpire Al Barlick. The 18-member committee - six Hall of Famers, six baseball writers and six current or former baseball executives - votes on executives, umpires, managers and players whose eligibility in the annual baseball writers' election has expired.
SPORTS
March 5, 1996 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Theoretically, one of these years, it will be tough for the baseball Hall of Fame to find a Phillie to induct. But today, the Phillies could well run their Hall of Fame election streak to three years - if the Veterans Committee, as anticipated, selects Jim Bunning as its annual inductee. Bunning, Nellie Fox, Gil Hodges, Dom DiMaggio and Roger Maris are regarded as the players likely to get the most consideration today. Bunning, who missed being elected by just three votes in 1988 in balloting by the Baseball Writers Association of America, is believed to be the favorite.
SPORTS
February 27, 2003 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The redesigned Veterans Committee failed to elect anyone to the Baseball Hall of Fame yesterday. Gil Hodges, former Brooklyn Dodgers first baseman and New York Mets manager, came closest, falling 11 shy with 50 votes. Sixty-one of 81 votes were needed for election on the players' ballot, and 60 of 79 were needed on the "composite" ballot, which included managers, executives and umpires. "Maybe not so many people fell through the cracks as some people think," said Joe Morgan, the Hall of Fame second baseman.
SPORTS
March 6, 1997 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Aug. 3, it may be tough to find a soul on the streets of Norristown, Pa. - because everybody will be camped out in Cooperstown, N.Y., watching their favorite son enter the Baseball Hall of Fame. That, of course, is Tommy Lasorda, who yesterday was elected to the Hall by the Veterans Committee, just seven months after he retired from 20 illustrious seasons of managing the Los Angeles Dodgers. Lasorda, 69, will become the 14th man to enter the Hall as a manager - and only the second to be elected the year after he retired.
NEWS
March 8, 1995 | By Michael Bamberger, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
His long wait in baseball purgatory is over. His fans can stop decrying the injustice. Yesterday, Richie Ashburn, the former Phillies Whiz Kid, was elected to the Hall of Fame. As soon as he got the news, Ashburn called his 90-year-old mother, Genevieve Ashburn, in Tilden, Neb. "Your son's made the Hall of Fame," he said. She cried. Her 67-year-old son did not. Ashburn, the gentle-voiced Nebraskan who has been an amiable and well- respected figure in Philadelphia's baseball life since 1948, received the game's ultimate honor from the Hall of Fame's 17-member Veterans Committee.
SPORTS
December 6, 2008 | By Rich Westcott FOR THE INQUIRER
In the parade of inductees into the Baseball Hall of Fame, Philadelphia has been more than amply represented. Now, the area might be favored once again. Three former players with ties to the Philadelphia area are being considered for induction into the baseball shrine. First baseman Mickey Vernon and two former Phillies, pitcher Bucky Walters and outfielder Sherry Magee, are among 10 former major-league players on the Veterans Committee ballot. The ballot includes only players who began their big-league careers before 1943 and who played in the majors for at least 10 years.
SPORTS
February 25, 2007 | By Jim Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is the time right for the hard-liners on the revamped Veterans Committee to finally admit someone to the Hall of Fame? It certainly feels that way. Results of the biennial election will be released Tuesday, and there seems to be a good chance that someone will join Cal Ripken and Tony Gwynn on induction day in Cooperstown on July 29. Ron Santo and Gil Hodges both came up just eight votes shy of election two years ago and one or both...
NEWS
December 26, 2008 | By Rich Westcott
Once again, Baseball Hall of Fame voters have served up a heavy dose of injustice. This month, in the latest example of the hall's consistently incomprehensible voting, Marcus Hook native Mickey Vernon was denied admission. Vernon, who died in September, was one of 10 players on the ballot whose major-league careers began before 1943. To make matters worse, for the fourth consecutive year, nobody on a list of players whose careers started after 1943 and ended by 1987 was invited to Cooperstown, either.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
George Rubin, vice chairman and former president of Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust (PREIT), is stepping down from the firm at the end of May. According to a filing Tuesday with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Rubin will receive "approximately $2.6 million with his departure. " Rubin, 70, is the brother of PREIT's executive chairman, Ronald Rubin. He has been an officer of the commercial real estate company since 1997, when it merged with the Rubin Organization, a family-owned firm founded by Richard I. Rubin, father to George and Ronald.
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SPORTS
November 1, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
DICK ALLEN, a former MVP and seven-time All-Star, was announced as one of the 10 candidates eligible for induction to the National Baseball Hall of Fame through a veterans committee. Any candidate that receive votes on 75 percent of the ballots cast by the 16-member Golden Era Committee will earn election into the hallowed halls of Cooperstown. This winter, the veterans committee is selecting from players and executives whose contributions came during the "Golden Era," from 1947-72.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
George Rubin, vice chairman and former president of Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust (PREIT), is stepping down from the firm at the end of May. According to a filing Tuesday with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Rubin will receive "approximately $2.6 million with his departure. " Rubin, 70, is the brother of PREIT's executive chairman, Ronald Rubin. He has been an officer of the commercial real estate company since 1997, when it merged with the Rubin Organization, a family-owned firm founded by Richard I. Rubin, father to George and Ronald.
SPORTS
March 19, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
THEY'LL BE A baseball connection, of sorts, when Math Civics and Sciences plays St. John Neumann of Williamsport in tonight's PIAA Class A basketball semifinals. Sitting in the stands at East Pennsboro High in Enola will be Richard Allen Jr., the son of former Phillies slugger Dick Allen. Playing for Neumann will be Richard Allen III, or "Tre," as he is known, the ballplayer's grandson. When he's not watching his son play hoops, Allen Jr. is campaigning to get his now-72-year-old father, who works on the Phillies' community-relations team, into the Baseball Hall of Fame.
SPORTS
January 11, 2013 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
WHEN PAUL HAGEN was named the winner of the J.G. Taylor Spink Award for "meritorious contributions to baseball writing" last month, he never gave it a thought that he just might be the only living person to be honored at the Baseball Hall of Fame during induction weekend, July 26-28 in Cooperstown, N.Y. But that will be the case. With steroid-linked stars Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and Sammy Sosa eligible for the first time, members of the Baseball Writers Association of America didn't vote in a single player.
SPORTS
December 5, 2012 | Associated Press
Former all-star outfielder Lenny Dykstra was sentenced Monday to 61/2 months in prison for hiding baseball gloves and other heirlooms from his playing days that were supposed to be part of his bankruptcy filing, capping a tumultuous year of legal woes. The judge saddled Dykstra with 500 hours of community service and also ordered him to pay $200,000 in restitution. Dykstra, 49, apologized for his actions and promised to turn his life around. "I don't think I'm a bad person," said Dykstra, who was in handcuffs and wearing a white prison-issued jumpsuit.
SPORTS
February 25, 2012
ORLANDO, Fla. - Reggie Miller has a chance to nail his legacy, just as he did so many three-point shots. The Indiana Pacers great was announced Friday as a first-time finalist for the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. He is one of 12 finalists for the Class of 2012. Miller, a five-time all-star, was joined as a first-time finalist by five-time NCAA Final Four coach Rick Pitino, former NBA coach Bill Fitch, and two-time Olympic gold medalist Katrina McClain. On the ballot again are Maurice Cheeks, Don Nelson, Bernard King, Dick Motta, Hank Nichols, Ralph Sampson, Jamaal Wilkes, and the All-American Red Heads, known as the female version of the Harlem Globetrotters and the first women's professional basketball team.
SPORTS
December 6, 2011 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Ron Santo, the barrel-chested Chicago Cubs third baseman, was elected to the Hall of Fame Monday, overwhelmingly chosen by the Veterans Committee nearly a year to the day after he died hoping for the honor. "It's really exciting because so many years that we had parties over to his house in spring training saying, 'This is the year,' " said Hall of Fame teammate Billy Williams, a member of the voting panel. Santo, who played in the majors from 1960 to 1974, was a nine-time all-star, hit 342 home runs, and won five Gold Gloves.
SPORTS
November 4, 2011
I do not think Dick Allen belongs in the baseball Hall of Fame. I'm quite sure, however, that the Wampum Walloper belongs among the candidates listed on the Golden Era ballot that was released Thursday by the National Baseball Hall of Fame. And, yet, the list of players and executives selected from the era between 1947 and 1972 did not include the Phillies' first African-American star. Five position players - Ron Santo, Ken Boyer, Minnie Minoso, Tony Oliva and Gil Hodges - three pitchers - Jim Kaat, Luis Tiant and Allie Reynolds - and two executives - Buzzie Bavasi and Charlie Finley - were among the candidates selected by a Historical Overview Committee that was comprised of 11 members from the Baseball Writers Association of America.
SPORTS
January 6, 2011 | By PAUL HAGEN, hagenp@phillynews.com
SANDY ALOMAR SR. played for the Yankees in the mid-1970s. He used to bring his sons to the ballpark with him. That was the first time Pat Gillick, then New York's scouting coordinator, saw Roberto Alomar. In 1990, when Gillick was general manager of the Toronto Blue Jays, he traded Fred McGriff and Tony Fernandez to the San Diego Padres for Robbie Alomar and Joe Carter in a blockbuster deal. He still laughs when he tells the story of how McGriff was his wife's favorite player and Doris scolded him and told him to get back from the winter meetings before he screwed up the team any further; she relented somewhat after Alomar played an integral role in the Jays' world championships in 1992 and '93. Gillick became general manager of the Baltimore Orioles in November 1995.
SPORTS
November 28, 2010 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
A veterans committee for baseball's Hall of Fame will meet next week at the game's annual winter meetings to judge the merits of 12 candidates recently selected for approval by yet another committee. It is a somewhat convoluted process intended to give due consideration to those who might have slipped through the cracks of the Hall of Fame, which has notorious gaps in the floorboards. The Historical Oversight Committee, focused this time on the last 40 years of baseball, came up with a list that covers the gamut from great players (Vida Blue)
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