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Veterans Day

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NEWS
November 12, 2002 | By Jane Eisner
Yesterday's commemoration of Veterans' Day was its usual unremarkable mixture of rain-soaked ceremony and unabashed commercialism. President Bush paid all due honor to the nation's fighting forces while promoting his own war with Iraq. Aging soldiers closed ranks - they're dying at a rate of a thousand a day now - and some schools and offices closed doors, an homage to those who made the ultimate sacrifice before such a notion became a Hollywood clich?. Still, time did not stop yesterday at the 11th hour of the 11th day, when the original Armistice was signed.
NEWS
October 27, 2003
In the last 60 years, Americans have fought in wars and conflicts all over the globe. A new cohort of veterans will return from the battlefields of Iraq. What are your thoughts as this Veterans Day - originally the Armistice Day of World War I - approaches? Do you look back on your own or your family's experience of war? Do you have words for the returning veterans of this latest conflict? Send letters or essays of about 200 to 300 words to South Jersey Voices, 53 Haddonfield Rd., Suite 300, Cherry Hill, N.J. 08002.
NEWS
November 15, 1987
Now that the evidence has melted away, it's hard to believe that the area was covered with snow on Wednesday. At left, pedestrians walk through the storm on 15th Street just north of Chestnut Street. At right, Anthony Hoppe and his children, Rebecca, 8, and Robert, 4, were at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington to observe Veterans Day. The name of Sgt. Thomas S. Lipp, Hoppe's brother-in-law, recently was added to the memorial.
NEWS
November 11, 1995
Russian and U.S. troops speed side by side in armored personnel carriers and Humvees, their colorful unit flags whipping in the chill autumn wind. A Hollywood fantasy or Tom Clancy potboiler? No. Those were real Russian and U.S. units on maneuvers last month in the hills above Ft. Riley, Kan. The unthinkable has become the unremarkable only four years after the collapse of the Soviet empire, which brings us to Veterans Day, 1995. It is an opportunity to reflect upon, and pay tribute to, those who served the United States in war and stand ready to defend its best interests in peace.
NEWS
November 9, 1986 | By Marilou Regan, Special to The Inquirer
In Delaware County, where there are more than 90,000 veterans and 75 veterans posts, Veterans Day has special meaning. "Patriotism is still alive and well in Delaware County," said John Kearney, a member of Springfield's American Legion Post 227. "The veterans organizations here are very strong in their memberships and in their activities. We're very involved in Americanism. " The veterans organizations in the county include the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the American Legion, the Disabled American Veterans, the Jewish War Veterans, the Vietnam Veterans of America, the Veterans of World War I and a group of former prisoners of war. Kearney, who was in the Army in World War II, said the veterans groups perform community service by visiting hospitals, sponsoring scholarships for youths and entertaining disadvantaged and retarded children.
NEWS
November 18, 1992 | BY MIKE ROYKO
The phone jarred me awake last Wednesday. The familiar voice on the other end said: "Hey, grab your socks, fall out on the road, let's celebrate. " Slats, what are you talking about? "It's our day. We're being honored. " For what? "It's Veterans Day, don't you know? So you're a veteran and I'm a veteran, let's do something. " But it is a workday. We have to work. "Yeah, I guess you're right. But it don't seem right. " What don't? "This is a holiday.
NEWS
November 9, 1999 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The largest Veterans Day parade in the town's history is planned to begin at noon Thursday, with a military flyover; 17 school bands; a host of state officials, including Gov. Ridge as the grand marshal; and a Veterans Legacy flag-exchange ceremony. Mayor Bob McMahon, the parade's chairman, said that during the flag exchange, each veteran will hand a U.S. flag and a POW-MIA flag to a relative or student. "Through the flag exchange ceremony, we hope to give a new generation who has not experienced war firsthand a chance to appreciate what their family members did to preserve freedom in this country," McMahon said.
NEWS
November 10, 1988 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alfred Pirolli is just like the rest of us. He still feels a thrill, "a tingle in the spine," he calls it, when the flag passes by and the band plays "The Star-Spangled Banner. " And when a lone bugler sounds "Taps," a lump builds in his throat and his eyes mist a bit. "Yeah, it's still there. Though I hear the national anthem and 'Taps' every day, the feeling's always there. I think it's there for all of us," Pirolli said. He knows that tomorrow, during the 10 a.m. Veterans Day wreath-laying ceremonies of the United Veterans Council on Washington Square, those feelings will return.
NEWS
November 15, 1989 | By Judy Baehr, Special to The Inquirer
With all the pomp and circumstance they could muster, members of Haddonfield's American Legion Post 38 dedicated their new meeting hall, appropriately enough, on Saturday, Veterans Day. The two-story, brick-and-frame building, tucked between the PATCO High Speed Line and Haddon Avenue at 129 Turnley Ave., replaces the Legion's former home - and one-time Birdwood Club - at 419 Hawthorne Ave. Sold last year to a developer, it was demolished in...
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NEWS
July 6, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John V. "Bud" Hendrick Jr., 95, of Wallingford, a cofounder of the Pennsylvania Veterans Museum in Media, died Tuesday, June 24, of cardiovascular disease at his home. Mr. Hendrick grew up in the Germantown section of Philadelphia and lived in Drexel Hill for 35 years before moving to Wallingford in 1988. He worked as a pharmaceutical representative for the wholesale division of Smith, Kline & French for 36 years and later joined Suburban Medical Services in Newtown Square as manager of pharmaceutical purchasing.
NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a 30-year military career in which he earned three graduate degrees, rose to the rank of colonel, and served as an aide to Pentagon brass, Robert Freniere can guess what people might say when they learn he's unemployed and lives out of his van: Why doesn't this guy get a job as a janitor? Freniere answers his own question: "Well, I've tried that. " Freniere, 59, says that his plea for help, to a janitor he once praised when the man was mopping the floors of his Washington office, went unfulfilled.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeffrey M. Kornblau, 56, of Huntingdon Valley, a lawyer in Pennsylvania and New Jersey who specialized in injury cases, died Monday, Nov. 11, of complications from a stem-cell transplant at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. In 1985, Mr. Kornblau opened a civil-litigation law firm in Philadelphia and Scranton, advocating for victims of injury, accidents, medical negligence, and other types of negligence. The practice expanded, and in 1987, he partnered with his wife, the former Lynn Sare, to establish Kornblau & Kornblau with offices in Jenkintown, Philadelphia, and Scranton.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
For John Campbell, it was a trip to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington that inspired him to spend nearly a decade chronicling the lives of the 43 soldiers and sailors from Gloucester County who died in the war. That day in the early 1990s, the Vietnam vet found himself staring at the Wall. "I saw all those names," Campbell said. He felt he owed it to each of those men to tell his story. Campbell was one of many veterans and others who spent Veterans Day at the National Constitution Center, honoring those who served with words of reflection.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The seats outside of the chapel at the Brig. Gen. William C. Doyle Veterans Memorial Cemetery in Arneytown began filling up early as final preparations were being made for Monday's Veterans Day ceremony. Richard Jacobowitz, a Marine Corps veteran, came out to "honor all those who served and pay respects to those who paid the ultimate sacrifice. " He would later visit the grave of his brother-in-law, Cpl. Luigi Marciante Jr., who died in the war in Iraq. "He was 25 years old," said Jacobowitz, 43, of Jackson, Ocean County.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
James M. Davie is president and CEO of a fledgling construction-management and general-contracting company. But the titles don't matter to him on Veterans Day. Being a Marine does. "I'd do it again if they'd let me," the 33-year-old Havertown resident and former corporal with the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit said of enlisting. Honorably discharged after sustaining serious injuries in an October 2004 insurgent attack in Fallujah, Davie will join other wounded warriors in a parade down Fifth Avenue in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
AW, THERE'S A REASON - despite the blockbusters and critical acclaim - that he'll always be "Rydal's own Bradley Cooper " to me. Cooper was in town this weekend to celebrate his 20-year high-school reunion with ol' chums at Germantown Academy. On Friday, he walked around the campus and caught up with old teachers, then headed to the reunion at MaGerks in Fort Washington (582 S. Bethlehem Pike). Cooper then stopped by the GA-Penn Charter football game, where Germantown Academy's Patriots triumphed, 42-35, ending a long losing streak against Penn Charter's Quakers.
NEWS
November 12, 2013
TODAY is the Veterans Day holiday. But if today is typical in all other respects, 22 American veterans will commit suicide. That brutal reality - 22 veteran suicides a day, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs - is driven not just by what our vets are asked to withstand on the battlefield, but by our treatment of them once they come home. In fact, Veterans Day seems increasingly to have become the day we take stock of our failing of our veterans, rather than a day to honor them.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2013
THEY WERE young and idealistic when they enlisted in the U.S. Army, right out of high school. Both men served overseas in wartime, protecting their country's interests. That's where the similarities end. Their experiences are separated by decades, social mores and very different outcomes. One of the brave soldiers I'm spotlighting today, thankfully, is still with us. Recognition for the other soldier's contribution comes late. But the sacrifice he made for his country has not gone unnoticed.
NEWS
November 12, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The veterans were in their late teens and early 20s when they fought in places that most people now know only from history books: Normandy, the Ardennes, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa. But as the nation marks Veterans Day, 70 years later, their memories of World War II remain vivid, as if the physical and mental wounds of their service had been much more recent. Sam Laskin, 93, of Lower Providence Township, clearly recalls piloting a B-24 bomber, dubbed "Mean Kid," over a German target in France in 1944 when flak passed through his plane, seat, and right leg before exiting the fuselage.
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