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NEWS
July 2, 1989 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The gold-star mother held a 20-year-old letter that was postmarked from South Vietnam. In the letter, which her left-handed son wrote while kneeling in the dark, Sgt. John J. McCarthy spoke out on the war that was dividing folks back home. "I think I realize now what this war is all about," McCarthy said in a letter to his family. "If only we could get these hippies and demonstrators over here for a bird's-eye look at what our country is doing for these people, a lot of minds would be changed.
NEWS
January 2, 2013 | By Julie Watson, Associated Press
SAN DIEGO - It's been almost 60 years since James McEachin returned home with a bullet still lodged in his chest, finding an America indifferent toward the troops who fought in Korea. Now he will get the homecoming parade he had expected. The Defense Department for the first time will put a float in Pasadena's Tournament of Roses - one of the most watched parades - to commemorate the veterans from a conflict that still casts a shadow over the world. "I think it's a magnificent gesture, and it cures a lot of ills," said McEachin, who will be among six veterans who will ride on the float Tuesday.
NEWS
July 26, 1998 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The three men sat tight-lipped in a middle row of the Bala movie theater as images of young GIs being blown to bits flashed before them. The colors on the silver screen were reflected in their faces: sea green, mud brown and, yes, blood red. There was Vincent J. Bognanni, 74, who crawled ashore at Omaha Beach on D-Day, June 6, 1944. His hardened expression gave away little as he studied director Steven Spielberg's re-creation of the panic, the noise, the sheer chaos of that decisive day in World War II in the movie Saving Private Ryan.
NEWS
January 12, 1996 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Services for Staff Sgt. Steven Mark Johnson, who died of a heart attack Dec. 31, will be held Wednesday. He was 35 and lived in Junction City, Kan. Johnson, formerly of West Philadelphia, had been in the Army for 15 years and was a veteran of Operation Desert Storm. "He was strong, hard-working. He had a way of explaining things. He was a very good listener, always willing to listen to a person's problems," said Jacqueline Jones, one of his sisters. "He was very family-oriented.
NEWS
May 26, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
It takes just a year for sunlight to fade a flag. The dead fade, too, if they're not remembered. And so, with flags in hand, a crew of volunteer firefighters made its way early last Sunday through Medford's three largest cemeteries, honoring the graves of those who once fought the nation's wars and the township's fires. "Is that Willits?" Butch Merefield, a past chief of Union Fire Company, asked his son as the two made their way under gray skies along the south side of Odd Fellows Cemetery.
SPORTS
August 15, 1996 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ray Rhodes says he's happy with the competition for jobs at this training camp, even if it hasn't translated into many changes on the depth chart. Going into camp, several positions appeared to be up for grabs. Several rookies appeared to have opportunities to crack the starting lineup. But going into the third preseason game on Sunday, the incumbents are miles ahead of the challengers. Consider tight end, where second-round draft pick Jason Dunn was the odds-on favorite to beat out veterans Ed West and Jimmie Johnson, who caught a total of 26 passes last season.
SPORTS
October 20, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The NFL's so-called replacement players were themselves replaced yesterday as hundreds of striking veterans returned to work, ready to pick up the pieces of this shattered season. The regular players, who were told Thursday that they could not report and play in last Sunday's games, were welcomed back this time. But not all the replacements were given the gate. The New York Jets and Cleveland Browns each kept 15 strikebreakers, the Miami Dolphins retained 14 and the New Orleans Saints kept 11. The teams are allowed to keep 85 players until Saturday, when they must reduce their rosters to 45. For the players who stayed, there was a question of how much tension there would be with the veterans who walked the picket lines for 24 days.
NEWS
August 21, 1988 | By Mary E. Charest, Special to The Inquirer
Dewey Stuart labored for about 200 hours during the spring and summer to spruce up the War Memorial in Narberth. His friend, Edward Burdo, drove 580 miles during one June week in search of more of the granite used to build that monument. A number of Narberth citizens spent hours folding, sealing and mailing more than 2,000 letters requesting funds for a new monument. These people and dozens of others donated time and talents for a double cause they thought was important: refurbishing the Narberth War Memorial, which honors soldiers who fought in World Wars I and II, and building a new memorial for the veterans of the Korean and Vietnam Wars.
NEWS
April 27, 1995 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Morris Hunter, 98, a World War I soldier who marched in parades beside veterans from every national conflict from the Civil War to Desert Storm, died of respiratory failure Sunday at Integrated Health Services, in Whitemarsh. Mr. Hunter was born Nov. 22, 1896. He went to war in France as a rigger, an air-frame mechanic responsible for repairing and maintaining bi-wing fighter planes made of wood, canvas and wire for the Army Air Corps. When the planes returned from their mission, his job was to patch any bullet holes in the canvas, check the wood struts, and tighten or replace the guy wires that held the whole thing together, said his great-nephew, Patton Hunter.
SPORTS
July 1, 1989 | By Dave Caldwell, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the congested lobby of the Marriott Marquis hotel in downtown Atlanta at the winter baseball meetings in early December, Phillies president Bill Giles paused to make a promise. Giles told a group from the Phillies' new triple-A farm team, the Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre Red Barons, that the Phillies would acquire triple-A veterans from other organizations to help the Red Barons become a winner. And a winner would help lure fans to the Lackawanna County Multi-Purpose Stadium, the Red Barons' new 10,600-seat, $22 million home.
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