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Veterans

NEWS
March 21, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nancy Sloane Coates, 94, of Haverford, whose Community Clothes Charity raised millions of dollars for Philadelphia-area causes, died Thursday, March 12, of congestive heart failure at home. Mrs. Coates was born in New York City in 1920 to the family that founded W. & J. Sloane, an interior decorator and furnishings business. The chain's flagship was at 19th Street and Broadway; its designers decorated the White House and the Breakers hotel in Palm Beach, Fla., during the 1890s. As a young woman, Mrs. Coates was inspired by Florence Nightingale.
SPORTS
March 10, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 76ers can increase the likelihood that they will have a successful future with one simple move: General manager Sam Hinkie must re-sign Jason Richardson to a one- or two-year deal. I'm not saying that the 34-year-old should retain his starting shooting-guard spot. Instead, the Sixers (14-49) need to give that to a draft pick or someone younger than Richardson to see if that person fits into their long-term plans. But Richardson needs to stay. Now that the 6-foot-6, 225-pounder is healthy again, his work ethic alone will make the Sixers a harder-working team.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Tax time can be especially stressful for military families. But servicemen and women are allowed extra time to file and are eligible for free filing help. If you're serving outside the United States (including Puerto Rico) as of April 15, 2015, you're granted an automatic two-month extension to file tax returns. If that's not enough time, by submitting Form 4868 to the IRS, you can extend filing by an additional four months, according to the American Armed Forces Mutual Aid Association.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THERE WAS something strange about that hair tonic Charlie Zebrowski was splashing on the heads of his fellow sailors aboard the destroyer USS Coughlin. A case of it had been sent to him by a cousin when he learned that Charlie was the ship's unofficial barber, keeping the other sailors trim for inspections. There was something different about the tonic all right. It was booze! An honest mistake? Or his cousin's idea of a good joke? Whatever, Charlie soon became the most popular man on a ship that often saw action in World War II. Even officers stopped into Charlie's makeshift barbershop for a cut - and a sip. There was one thing that Charlie Zebrowski appreciated and that was a good joke.
SPORTS
March 2, 2015 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
CLEARWATER, Fla. - The blue tables on either end of the Phillies clubhouse at Bright House Field are typically used by players for breakfast and lunch. For Paul Clemens, it is where he gleans advice from veteran pitchers such as Cliff Lee and Jonathan Papelbon. "I just sit next to them and listen," said Clemens, who will start Sunday's exhibition against visiting University of Tampa. "I try to sit around and soak up as much as I can. " Clemens said the Phillies veterans are guiding him through the mental aspects of the game.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John E. Joniec, 95, a World War II veteran, retired building superintendent, and, later, a union official, died Wednesday, Feb. 4, of congestive heart failure at the Visiting Nurse Association Hospice in Philadelphia. After his mother died, Mr. Joniec, a lifelong Philadelphian, left school at age 12 to serve as a produce worker, then a horse-and-wagon milkman, to help support his family. He volunteered for the Army in April 1941. He was assigned to the 19th Infantry Division on Oahu, Hawaii, and was awakened at 5 a.m. for guard duty at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
When she first walked through the maze of cubicles at the National Veterans Crisis Line in the winter of 2012, Ellen Goosenberg Kent thought she knew what to expect. Goosenberg Kent grew up in Philadelphia during the Vietnam era, the daughter of a Marine who had served in World War II. An Emmy-winning documentary filmmaker, she had already made two films about soldiers coping with broken bodies and spirits after returning home from war. This latest project, however, exploring the inner workings of the nation's suicide help line for veterans, surprised her and the film's producer, Dana Perry.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
AFTER WORKING the cold, hard streets of the city as a cop, bearing witness to the daily depredations of his fellow humans, William Dixon liked nothing better than to have the sun in his face and in his soul. To seek it out, he took numerous cruises to the Caribbean islands, and also found soothing rays closer to home at his summer house in Whitesboro, in Cape May County, N.J. His favorite time was when his family would gather there for get-togethers, and he gloried in having his loved ones around him. He was a master of the barbecue grill.
NEWS
February 12, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
A VETERAN State Police officer faces criminal charges after a grand jury concluded that he "breached routine, yet critical, safety protocol" in a firearms-training mishap that killed a young colleague, officials said yesterday. The Montgomery County District Attorney's Office has charged Cpl. Richard Schroeter, 42, with five counts of reckless endangerment in the death of Officer David Kedra, who was shot during a training session on Sept. 30. Schroeter, a 20-year veteran of the State Police, was conducting the course at the Montgomery County Public Safety Training Center in Conshohocken when he allegedly pulled the trigger of his "duty-issued firearm" to demonstrate the "trigger mechanics" of the weapon, a new model that the department is supplying its officers, the D.A.'s office said in a statement.
SPORTS
January 31, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Many of the Phillies' offseason moves, via trade and free agency, have addressed starting pitching. They added another arm to the mix Thursday when they signed veteran righthander Chad Billingsley to a one-year, $1.5 million contract. Billingsley, 30, has not pitched since 2013 after undergoing Tommy John surgery in April of that year. He also underwent right flexor tendon surgery in June 2014. His deal includes performance bonuses. Lefthanded reliever Cesar Jimenez was designated for assignment to make room for Billingsley on the Phillies' 40-man roster.
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