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Veterans

BUSINESS
November 12, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
The country's first business incubator for veteran-owned technology firms will launch a local chapter here Wednesday at the Hub Cira Centre, next to Amtrak's 30th Street Station. Under the name the Bunker, the new incubator will assist military veteran-owned start-up companies and entrepreneurs. Launched in Chicago earlier this year, the Bunker is opening affiliates in Philadelphia and six other cities. "The veteran community is an able and ready talent pool of entrepreneurs," said Todd Connor, CEO of the Bunker and a Navy veteran.
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR & DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writers farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
BILL COSBY looked out at the veterans and civilians gathered at the All Wars Memorial to Colored Soldiers and Sailors, on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and asked those who've already given so much for just one more thing. "I want you to go deep in your heart right now and I want you to . . . call out the name of someone who left their life for us over there or died coming back here," Cosby said. "DO IT!" And the crowd of hundreds shouted hundreds of names. Each name was different.
NEWS
November 11, 2014
IF VETERANS DAY is about honoring the men and women who have bravely served our country, why is it that tens of thousands of them are left to trudge from shelters to street corners with no place to call home? Veterans suffer from disproportionately high rates of post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, substance abuse and other crippling health conditions. Those without family and social-support networks often find it difficult to hold a job and pay the rent. As a result, in Philadelphia alone, there are more than 1,400 veterans living on the streets, with thousands more at risk of falling through the cracks of the system, according to data just released from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
NEWS
November 10, 2014
WE OFTEN hear, especially in times of war, times such as now, of men and women in our military who "gave their lives for their country. " That means death, the ultimate sacrifice. Other forms of sacrifice might be worse. Modern medicine means lives formerly ended can be saved - and are. For many, a saved life is not the end of the story, it's just the beginning. The lucky wounded are treated and released. It is far worse for the unlucky wounded, the catastrophically wounded.
NEWS
November 10, 2014
VETERANS DAY: It's not the holiday where we honor the sacrifices of our military men and women, but the day we mark yet another year of our shabby treatment of them. Last year, for example, we marked the holiday by a report that found 22 veterans commit suicide every single day. This year's annual Veterans Health Administration scandal is also stomach turning: a report in May that at least 40 patients had died waiting for care at a VA hospital in Phoenix, Ariz. The revelations of serious backlogs and secret waiting lists led to the eventual resignation of Eric Shinseki, the Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Brielle Urciuoli, Inquirer Staff Writer
For more than two decades, Bancroft NeuroRehab in Cherry Hill has been helping adults with brain injuries relearn such everyday tasks as cooking, cleaning, walking, and speaking. The highly individualized program also helps patients, including veterans, strengthen skills needed to reenter the workforce. The center treats people with an array of conditions, including Alzheimer's, dementia, and hypoxic and traumatic brain injuries. "After acquiring a neurological illness, you need to relearn things you could do before," Cynthia Boyer, NeuroRehab executive director, said Friday.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ROBERT BERGHAIER probably could have been a writer or an artist. He didn't take up either trade, but his son, Robert, said his father, a veteran of two wars, had a discerning eye. "He was very observant," his son said. "He had a very good eye and a gift for being very descriptive. He could process information and tell you exactly what happened. " What happened to Robert Berghaier might have made a good book. He and his son would sit around the kitchen table and the elder Berghaier would regale his son with stories of his adventures, down to the smallest detail.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal and Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writers
Eric Frein will get a legal team with decades of murder trial experience, including a lawyer who has both prosecuted and defended death penalty cases. The Pike County Public Defender's Office on Monday confirmed that a judge had appointed Robert Bernathy and Michael Weinstein to represent Frein, the alleged killer of a state trooper, who was captured Thursday after a 48-day manhunt in the Poconos. Weinstein confirmed that he was appointed at a rate of $178 an hour and that he met Monday with Frein in prison.
NEWS
November 1, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
EDWARD F. Crawford Sr. packed enough drama in his life to severely tax any normal man. He was a highly decorated Marine veteran of three wars, who received five Purple Hearts for wounds. He was an Upper Darby Township Police Officer, state constable serving into his 80s, a boxer with a few professional bouts, and the founder of a boxing gym that saved many kids from the temptations of the streets. Ed Crawford, who served a total of 40 years in the Marines, including stints in World War II, the Korean War and Vietnam War, and retired with the rank of Chief Warrant Officer 3 Gunner, died Sunday.
SPORTS
October 25, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
A chill wind blew off the Delaware River as the U.S. women's soccer team ran onto PPL Park's field Thursday evening to prepare for its CONCACAF Women's Championship 2014 semifinal match with Mexico a night later. Instinctively, as if they were students drawn to her for wisdom, several of the American players gathered around Christie Rampone. Rampone, a 39-year-old New Jersey mother of two, is the aged guru of the U.S. squad, which can guarantee itself a spot in the 2015 World Cup with a victory Friday night.
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