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Veto

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NEWS
January 6, 1987
Congratulations to Mayor Goode for announcing his intention to veto the pension bill approved by City Council on Dec. 18. Here's hoping Council will produce a responsible document in which fair treatment for all rises above self-interest. Mary Jane Baker Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 2, 1996 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
City Councilman David Cohen today was to introduce a proposal calling on Philadelphia's two SEPTA board members to veto the agency's fiscal 1997 operating budget. "As a result of major reductions in state and federal subsidies, SEPTA management has proposed to the SEPTA board a budget which would cause cutbacks so sharp as to amount to a dismantling of the mass transit system," he warned. The SEPTA budget threatens to "engender administrative chaos from layoffs, and force a completely counter-productive fare increase," he said.
NEWS
August 7, 1988
Funny thing about the $300 billion defense bill that President Reagan vetoed Wednesday - you know, the bill that snapped his patience with liberals trying "to erode our military strength. " Among those urging him to sign the bill was one Colin Powell, who serves as Mr. Reagan's national security adviser. Other closet peaceniks opposing a veto were Frank C. Carlucci, who runs the Pentagon, and Republican Sens. Strom Thurmond and John Warner. Clearly, Mr. Reagan's veto was motivated not so much by the bill's contents - its do's and don'ts on "Star Wars" and the like - as by campaign politics.
NEWS
October 17, 1991
A couple of weeks ago, City Council snubbed the reasonable demands of Philadelphia's under-represented Latino community for a Council redistricting plan that would give it more voice. What Council did instead was protect its incumbents - essentially rubberstamping the status quo. It was a petty, self- indulgent performance. Mayor Goode can do the city a favor by calling Council's bluff. He should veto the plan and press Council to draw a new political map that accommodates the vast growth of Philadelphia's Latino population.
NEWS
May 22, 1986 | By William Lewis, Special to The Inquirer
The Gibbsboro Council voted 5-0 Tuesday night to override Mayor John White's veto and pass an ordinance that would establish conservation districts in the borough. The ordinance places tight restrictions on the use of any property near a waterway in the community and prohibits cutting down trees or riding trail bikes in those areas. White vetoed the ordinance when it was originally passed on April 15 and did not attend Tuesday's council meeting. White said the ordinance designates any property adjacent to a waterway as a conservation area.
NEWS
January 20, 1999 | By Edward G. Rendell
On behalf of the citizens of Philadelphia, I thank the six members of City Council who displayed extraordinary courage in sustaining my veto of the ill-conceived and potentially disastrous Bill No. 980708, better known as the pension COLA bill. All of us agree on a need to increase the benefits of the city's 30,000 retirees, especially those older pensioners and their beneficiaries and survivors whose benefits have been eroded by inflation. But we as elected officials also have an obligation to the citizens to ensure that any plan to increase benefits must be fiscally responsible, addressing the need for affordable increases while protecting the city's General Fund and preserving the integrity of the pension fund.
NEWS
June 24, 2011 | By Marcia Gelbart, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter on Thursday vetoed City Council legislation that would preserve the DROP pension program. Nutter conceded that Council could have the last word. Council passed the bill last week by a 14-3 vote, enough to comfortably override a veto. He exercised his veto even though the legislation would reduce DROP's cost. The program has cost the city pension fund at least $100 million since its 1999 creation. Council claims its new version would cost the equivalent of a one-time payment of $15 million to $20 million.
NEWS
October 24, 1990 | By Leigh Jackson, Daily News Staff Writer
A coalition of six local civil rights organizations yesterday blasted President Bush for his "misleading and unfortunate" veto Monday of the 1990 Civil Rights Act. "It is a tremendous blow to the progress that we have made in this country," said the Rev. William B. Moore, of the Tenth Memorial Baptist Church and immediate past president of the Black Clergy of Philadelphia & Vicinity, which represents approximately 400 black congregations....
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
After an emotional and politically charged debate, the House yesterday failed to override President Bush's veto on using federal funds for abortions for poor women victimized by rape or incest. But the President's victory could be a costly one: Some Republicans predicted that Bush's position could damage both his party and his own political future. "I fear, as a Republican, that President Bush may have stumbled on the one issue that could cost him re-election in 1992," said Rep. Bill Green (R., N.Y.)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 15, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
President Obama is threatening to veto legislation that would make it easier for victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks to sue Saudi Arabia. Supporters of the bill vow that they will push for a congressional override. The measure is an outgrowth of a long-running lawsuit against the government of Saudi Arabia by 9/11 victims and their families, who claim that the Saudis funded Islamist charities that in turn bankrolled al-Qaeda. The suit was filed by the Center City firm of Cozen O'Connor, which was instrumental in pushing for enactment of the bill.
NEWS
September 1, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
PENNINGTON, N.J. - Gov. Christie on Tuesday vetoed legislation that would have nearly doubled New Jersey's minimum wage to $15 an hour in five years, calling the proposal a "radical increase" that would hurt businesses and consumers. Speaking in the produce aisle of a family-owned grocery store in Mercer County, Christie accused the Democratic-controlled Legislature of pandering "to folks who are uninformed because they neither receive the minimum wage nor pay it. " "This type of heavy hand of government, saying that we know better than the people who actually run these businesses, is the reason why in past administrations New Jersey has gotten less and less affordable," Christie said, standing in front of a stand of 69-cent bananas and various organic foods.
NEWS
August 26, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Christie on Wednesday proposed loosening New Jersey's "overly burdensome" gun laws, saying the state should make it easier for residents who are eligible to buy handguns to obtain a permit to carry them in public. Christie, a Republican, vetoed a bill passed by the Democratic-controlled Legislature that would have codified regulations that make it difficult for firearms owners to obtain a concealed-carry permit. Instead of "doubling down" on these "unreasonable requirements," Christie said in his veto message, the state should reverse course and "enable residents of New Jersey to exercise their Second Amendment rights, while still preventing dangerous persons from legally obtaining firearms.
NEWS
August 20, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Christie on Thursday vetoed two bills that could have increased the ranks of New Jersey's voters, including a measure that would have automatically registered driver's license applicants. The other bill would have allowed 17-year-olds to vote in primaries if they would be 18 by the time of the general election. Christie nixed that bill as "legally questionable. " The Republican governor had harsher words for the automatic registration bill, which would have required the Motor Vehicle Commission to register all applicants for driver's licenses, permits, other identification cards, or renewals to vote unless they opted out. "This bill should be called 'the Voter Fraud Enhancement and Permission Act,' " Christie said in a veto message, asserting that the bill would "almost certainly register ineligible voters.
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Erin Serpico, Staff Writer
On an Atlantic City beach, a group of five adults recently sat a few feet from the ocean, some with lit cigars in hand. They placed makeshift ashtrays, really just upside-down seashells, next to their beach chairs, storing discarded cigars there. Two from the group - Monica Plumley, 48, of Glassboro, and Shelley Gatanis, 50, of Woodstown - had just met each other that day, and bonded over cigars. "I want to be able to do anything that's appropriate freely," Plumley said of their right to smoke on the sand.
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - New Jersey lawmakers on Thursday passed legislation that would nearly double the state's minimum wage to $15 an hour over the next five years, despite Gov. Christie's veto threat. Effective Jan. 1, 2017, the bill would raise the wage from the current $8.38 an hour to $10.10. The legislation would phase in greater increases through 2021, when the wage would reach $15 an hour. The wage would be tied to inflation to adjust for the cost of living. The legislation passed the state Senate by a vote of 21-18 on Thursday.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
A stroke of Gov. Christie's pen ended hopes that more than 400 Delaware River Port Authority workers would soon resolve a long-simmering contract dispute. On Monday, Christie vetoed an agreement on economic terms that would have framed a contract resolution for 426 workers from three unions. "We were kind of shocked, quite frankly," said Howard Wells, president of Teamsters Local 676, which represents more than 200 of the workers waiting for a new contract. DRPA management communicated with the governor's office throughout the negotiation process and was hopeful that the terms would be acceptable to Trenton.
NEWS
May 30, 2016
Sharif El-Mekki is the principal of Mastery Charter School, Shoemaker Campus, in Philadelphia Two weeks ago, Gov. Wolf vetoed a bill that would have helped school principals ensure that our most effective teachers are in classrooms for the 128,000 students who attend the Philadelphia School District. This is a missed opportunity to put the needs of kids over the needs of adults. House Bill 805 would have permitted district leaders, during layoffs, to furlough teachers who get "failing" or "needs improvement" grades on their annual evaluations.
NEWS
May 25, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Christie on Monday again conditionally vetoed a bill requiring domestic violence offenders to surrender firearms, saying current law already covers the issue. The Republican governor said in a veto message that the bill would place "redundant restrictions on firearms ownership while ignoring the larger problem of domestic violence. " Current law requires officers to seize a person's weapons when there is probable cause to believe the person has committed domestic violence, said Christie, who vetoed a version of the bill last year.
NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf on Wednesday upheld his promise to veto a bill that would lessen the role of seniority in teacher layoffs. The Protecting Excellent Teachers Act, passed this month by the House and Senate, had become a political football. This week, a key Republican in the legislature warned the governor that the issue could resurface in next month's budget negotiations if he vetoed the bill. Supporters, including the state School Boards Association, said the measure would let districts protect their best teachers by using performance ratings, not seniority, in determining layoffs.
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