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Vichy

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1994 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Claude Chabrol's ingenious and unsparing The Eye of Vichy (L'Oeil de Vichy) takes a look at a still-volatile issue - French collaboration with the Nazis - from an oblique angle. It yields a highly effective essay on the dangers of seeing only what you wish to see. The subject has been memorably aired in films as diverse as The Sorrow and the Pity and Lacombe, Lucien, but Chabrol takes the position that fascism is best denounced with the words and images of the fascists themselves.
NEWS
February 21, 2003
RE Shawn-Pierre Dessaigne's trashing of Michael Smerconish: Mr. Pierre-Dessaigne's name tells us a lot. Why respond by questioning Smerconish's intelligence? OK, let me challenge his: Remember that the French were still chopping people's heads off and incarcerating others on Devil's Island well into the 20th century. France's problem is that after WWII, the U.S. became the cultural, economic and arts capital of the world. The French could go Vichy again at a moment's notice. Max Cooper, Trappe
NEWS
March 18, 1994 | BY JACK McKINNEY
There is only one defendant sitting behind the bulletproof glass as France prosecutes former Militia chief Paul Touvier for "crimes against humanity" during the Nazi occupation of World War II. But the trial is also expected to cast a harsh new light on the right-wing fundamentalists of the French Catholic Church who obstructed justice by hiding Touvier during his four decades on the run. Touvier, now 78, was the intelligence chief of...
NEWS
February 5, 1990 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
If you experienced World War II, or studied it in school, you know of the stigma attached to the Vichy government of Nazi-occupied France. After a lot of martial bluster about the readiness of their army and the impregnability of their Maginot Line, the French folded before Hitler's armored divisions in just 46 days, and the Third Republic was replaced by a puppet regime in Vichy under the passive leadership of 84-year-old Marshal Petain and...
NEWS
July 17, 2005 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
First, Laura "Lola" Cerini rubs salt in the wounds. Or she would, if there were any. "You haven't cut yourself shaving?" she asks, applying tangerine celtic sea salt. Fortunately, for once, the answer is no. Not a solitary Scooby Doo bandage adorns my legs. The salt is for shedding dead skin, something humans have carried around forever but which has become a removal mission in contemporary spa services. Cerini works at the enormous, multi-eponymous Louis Christian Wayne Robert Salon and Spa in Cherry Hill, which also offers a vanilla orange brown sugar scrub (which may be two flavors too many)
NEWS
February 11, 1987 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Historically, the most shameful feature of France's submission to Germany in World War II was not that it occurred so swiftly, but that it was sustained at length with such remarkable efficiency. Remember, while the initial conquest took less than 50 days, the German occupation of France was to last 50 months. From a purely military standpoint, the task of occupying so populous a country of 210,000 square miles for more than four years, while also fighting on two major fronts, should have taxed the Nazis' resources beyond limit.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2004 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For an all-purpose definition of acting, throw out your dictionary and go see Michael Caine in The Statement. About to turn 71 in a few weeks, Caine is among the pantheon of distinguished senior film actors. Any questions? His performance answers them. Partly because of Caine and partly because of meticulous work by veteran director Norman Jewison, The Statement is a fiction done so effectively, it rings true - even slick lines that may otherwise be rancid. The premise of the film stems from France's collaboration with the Nazis in World War II. Much of The Statement, written by the late novelist Brian Moore and adapted for the screen by Ronald Harwood, is loosely based on the story of Frenchman Paul Touvier, who died in prison for ordering the deaths of seven Jews.
NEWS
November 15, 1989 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
"Do you think babies in their mothers' bellies have souls?" wonders Marie, a French housewife living under German occupation during World War II. Her question, as timely today as in 1941, is not idly asked. You see, Marie is what the French call "a maker of angels. " Americans, less prone to euphemism, would call her an abortionist. Story of Women, Claude Chabrol's fact-based chronicle of a provincial abortionist who thrived during the Vichy years, is a chilling and fascinatingly unresolved work.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1993 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When a certain plump, Buddhalike filmmaker with multiple chins left England for the United States in 1940 to direct a movie called Rebecca, one of his former producers criticized this Briton - without naming him - for abandoning his homeland during wartime. According to the producer, Michael Balcon (who had financed The Man Who Knew Too Much and The 39 Steps), this unspecified director - who, of course, was Alfred Hitchcock - left his British associates high and dry while they struggled, shorthanded, making films for the war effort.
NEWS
December 23, 2012 | Reviewed by Paul Jablow
The Blood of Free Men The Liberation of Paris, 1944 By Michael Neiberg Basic Books. 352 pp. $28.99   Legendary World War II correspondent Ernie Pyle felt he had seen it all, and "I had thought that for me there could never again be any elation in war. But I had reckoned without the liberation of Paris. " Quoted toward the end of Neiberg's riveting account of a generally neglected subplot of the war, Pyle observed how the citizens of the city, with minimal help from Allied forces, threw off the yoke of Nazi occupation with what Albert Camus described as "the blood of free men. " The short version goes something like this: German forces occupied Paris on June 14, 1940, and eight days later, an armistice was signed between Germany and France setting up the collaborationist Vichy government headed by World War I hero Marshal Philippe Petain.
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NEWS
December 23, 2012 | Reviewed by Paul Jablow
The Blood of Free Men The Liberation of Paris, 1944 By Michael Neiberg Basic Books. 352 pp. $28.99   Legendary World War II correspondent Ernie Pyle felt he had seen it all, and "I had thought that for me there could never again be any elation in war. But I had reckoned without the liberation of Paris. " Quoted toward the end of Neiberg's riveting account of a generally neglected subplot of the war, Pyle observed how the citizens of the city, with minimal help from Allied forces, threw off the yoke of Nazi occupation with what Albert Camus described as "the blood of free men. " The short version goes something like this: German forces occupied Paris on June 14, 1940, and eight days later, an armistice was signed between Germany and France setting up the collaborationist Vichy government headed by World War I hero Marshal Philippe Petain.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2010 | By Paul Jablow FOR THE INQUIRER
A few years back, a massage therapist in rural Maine - perhaps as far as you can get from the glitter of this Jersey Shore town - thought of a new way to use some shells she had found on a Florida beach. Giving massages with the shells, she thought, might provide a lighter touch than the traditional heated stones used in some sessions. She took her idea for pampering patrons to the Showboat casino hotel, offering warm oil as a comfort for parched skin. "We dip the shells in warm oil. It's a little like a stone massage, but it leaves you with a different feeling," said Gina Rosenberger, owner of the Vive Day Spa and Salon there, which has been featuring the massages for about a year.
NEWS
July 17, 2005 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
First, Laura "Lola" Cerini rubs salt in the wounds. Or she would, if there were any. "You haven't cut yourself shaving?" she asks, applying tangerine celtic sea salt. Fortunately, for once, the answer is no. Not a solitary Scooby Doo bandage adorns my legs. The salt is for shedding dead skin, something humans have carried around forever but which has become a removal mission in contemporary spa services. Cerini works at the enormous, multi-eponymous Louis Christian Wayne Robert Salon and Spa in Cherry Hill, which also offers a vanilla orange brown sugar scrub (which may be two flavors too many)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2004 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For an all-purpose definition of acting, throw out your dictionary and go see Michael Caine in The Statement. About to turn 71 in a few weeks, Caine is among the pantheon of distinguished senior film actors. Any questions? His performance answers them. Partly because of Caine and partly because of meticulous work by veteran director Norman Jewison, The Statement is a fiction done so effectively, it rings true - even slick lines that may otherwise be rancid. The premise of the film stems from France's collaboration with the Nazis in World War II. Much of The Statement, written by the late novelist Brian Moore and adapted for the screen by Ronald Harwood, is loosely based on the story of Frenchman Paul Touvier, who died in prison for ordering the deaths of seven Jews.
NEWS
April 3, 2003
I would like to ask every reader of your newspaper to display a yellow ribbon on their tree, car, porch, mailbox, fence, etc., to show our support for our troops and all our allies fighting this war. I would like to ask anyone who wishes to pray for our president, for his is an awesome responsibility and he needs our support. So do all the families of our brave young men and women who so willingly give their lives for us and our freedoms. Let's display our flag and never let anyone take God's name out of our Pledge of Allegiance.
NEWS
February 21, 2003
RE Shawn-Pierre Dessaigne's trashing of Michael Smerconish: Mr. Pierre-Dessaigne's name tells us a lot. Why respond by questioning Smerconish's intelligence? OK, let me challenge his: Remember that the French were still chopping people's heads off and incarcerating others on Devil's Island well into the 20th century. France's problem is that after WWII, the U.S. became the cultural, economic and arts capital of the world. The French could go Vichy again at a moment's notice. Max Cooper, Trappe
NEWS
May 8, 2001 | By Dominic Sama INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Henri Pierre Sall?, 77, of Ardmore, who as a youth fled the Nazis in an improbable escape that included pedaling 400 miles on a bicycle and then joining a submarine crew, died of cancer Thursday at his home. Mr. Sall? worked as a carpenter in the Philadelphia area and New Jersey after World War II, specializing in the restoration and renovation of historic buildings. He also owned several apartment buildings in the suburbs. He retired in 1986. Mr. Sall? was 17 when Nazi troopers in 1940 visited his home in Paris and sought to take him away to a work camp.
NEWS
April 3, 1998 | Daily News wire services
Seventeen years after his role in the mass deportation of French Jews was first revealed, Maurice Papon was convicted yesterday of complicity in crimes against humanity and sentenced to 10 years in prison. The jury, which took nearly 19 hours to reach its verdict after six months - the longest trial in French history - found the 87-year-old former Vichy official guilty of organizing the arrest and detention of Jews during World War II. But it absolved him of any complicity in their deaths - accepting Papon's defense that he had not been aware of the Nazi program to exterminate the Jews.
NEWS
July 29, 1995 | By Martin E. Marty
Moral credibility, once lost, is hard to regain. We make the athletic outlaw sit in the penalty box; he re-enters the game under the vigilant eyes of the referee. The abuser must compile a record of changed ways before his "I'm sorry" is rewarded with a simple "You're forgiven; I trust you. " Earlier this month, France tried to buy back moral credibility, having lost some half century ago. France repented through the words of its president, Jacques Chirac, who acknowledged that the Vichy government, with considerable citizen support, turned Jews over to Germany and the death camps during World War II. France "repented," even though that verb does not quite match the acknowledgment of "collective error" that Chirac said would "forever sully" French history.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1994 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Claude Chabrol's ingenious and unsparing The Eye of Vichy (L'Oeil de Vichy) takes a look at a still-volatile issue - French collaboration with the Nazis - from an oblique angle. It yields a highly effective essay on the dangers of seeing only what you wish to see. The subject has been memorably aired in films as diverse as The Sorrow and the Pity and Lacombe, Lucien, but Chabrol takes the position that fascism is best denounced with the words and images of the fascists themselves.
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