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Victor Conte

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April 25, 2004 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Olympic gold medalist Marion Jones denied any knowledge yesterday of a check from her bank account that reportedly had been sent to Victor Conte, the founder of a San Francisco company that is at the center of an investigation into performance-enhancing drugs. Speaking yesterday after running the anchor leg of the victorious 4x100- and 4x200-meter relay teams in the "USA vs. The World" competition at the Penn Relays, Jones said she "never signed, endorsed, agreed upon or sent any check" to the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative (BALCO)
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June 25, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Tim Montgomery testified last year that he used human growth hormone and an undetectable steroid, and that the man at the center of a Bay area steroid scandal told him he supplied Barry Bonds with performance-enhancing drugs, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. The newspaper's report yesterday includes direct quotes from Montgomery's testimony to the federal grand jury that investigated the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative. The Chronicle did not say how it obtained the information.
SPORTS
March 3, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Slugger Barry Bonds and several other pro athletes received steroids from a lab implicated in an illegal distribution ring, the San Francisco Chronicle reported yesterday. New York Yankees stars Jason Giambi and Gary Sheffield, as well as three other major leaguers and one NFL player, were given steroids, the Chronicle reported, citing information given to federal investigators. The Chronicle reported that two of Bonds' former teammates - White Sox outfielder Marvin Benard and Royals catcher Benito Santiago - and former Oakland infielder Randy Velarde also received performance-enhancing drugs, as did Raiders linebacker Bill Romanowski.
SPORTS
October 24, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Victor Conte, the founder of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative, believes Barry Bonds won't be indicted. Conte spent 4 months in prison after pleading guilty in July 2005 to steroid distribution and money laundering. He denies providing Bonds with performance-enhancing drugs. A grand jury has been investigating whether Bonds committed perjury when he testified he never knowingly took performance-enhancing drugs. "I don't believe that they have the evidence to indict Barry Bonds," Conte said yesterday in New York while attending a book-release party for "Steroid Nation" by Shaun Assael, for which he was interviewed extensively.
SPORTS
June 26, 2009 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Staff Writer
Innocence is bliss Marlon Byrd, the former Phillie who patrols center field for the Texas Rangers, takes a variety of vitamins and health supplements. Nothing unusual there, of course, but his supplier and health consultant is the infamous Victor Conte, which is stupefying. Byrd recently told Yahoo Sports he has been buying supplements from the founder of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-operative (Balco) for 18 months. He also claims he never has asked Conte whether any of the substances he is using are banned.
SPORTS
November 20, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
The founder of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative alleged the government fabricated statements that suggested he provided steroids to top athletes, according to federal court documents filed yesterday. "I very clearly told all four of the law enforcement officers present that I would not cooperate with them in any way, regarding any of the physicians, coaches or athletes involved with BALCO Laboratories," Victor Conte said in the documents. The documents dispute statements the government said Conte made when agents raided his Burlingame nutritional supplement business in September 2003.
SPORTS
October 17, 2004 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
A man identified by the San Francisco Chronicle as Barry Bonds' personal trainer says in a taped conversation that the San Francisco Giants slugger used an undetectable performance-enhancing drug during the 2003 season, the newspaper reported. The person identified as trainer Greg Anderson, 38, Bonds' longtime friend and a defendant in the Balco steroids conspiracy case, also says on the recording that he expected to receive advance warning before Bonds had to submit to a drug test, according to the paper.
SPORTS
April 19, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
The head athletic trainer for the San Francisco Giants was told to appear before a federal grand jury investigating whether Barry Bonds lied about his connection to the BALCO steroids scandal, a newspaper reported. Stan Conte, who is not related to Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative owner Victor Conte, was subpoenaed to appear in a San Francisco federal courtroom on April 27, the San Francisco Chronicle reported yesterday, citing anonymous sources familiar with the investigation.
SPORTS
January 27, 2005 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
FBI agents raided the home of alleged steroid dealer Victor Conte and seized e-mail and other records yesterday as part of an investigation of grand jury testimony leaks in a broad sports-doping scandal, according to newspaper reports. At least a dozen agents raided Conte's San Mateo, Calif., home before 8 a.m., and within four hours seized a computer, cellular phone and lab records belonging to the founder of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative, the San Francisco Chronicle and San Jose Mercury News reported on their Web sites.
SPORTS
September 26, 2000 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. shot-putter C.J. Hunter, with wife Marion Jones by his side, began a campaign today to clear his name of charges that he took anabolic steroids. Hunter said that he "would never, ever do anything to bring shame on the people I love. " Jones, the 24-year-old 100-meter champion who will try to win four more Olympic gold medals in the next four days, appeared in order to "show my complete support for my husband. Aside from him being an athlete, he is my husband. " "I am still competing in the Sydney Games," she said.
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November 14, 2013 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
ORLANDO - The cost of doing business in baseball's inflationary market manifested itself Tuesday in the form of a 36-year-old outfielder who was exiled last winter to Mexico. Marlon Byrd signed a $700,000 last-chance, minor-league contract with the New York Mets in February and was traded to Pittsburgh in August. He bashed 24 home runs in a 2013 resurrection. That made him attractive to the Phillies, and they acted with aggression. Now, Byrd is a $16 million asset. "There's not a lot of power out there; it's pretty simple," general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. said.
SPORTS
June 26, 2009 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Staff Writer
Innocence is bliss Marlon Byrd, the former Phillie who patrols center field for the Texas Rangers, takes a variety of vitamins and health supplements. Nothing unusual there, of course, but his supplier and health consultant is the infamous Victor Conte, which is stupefying. Byrd recently told Yahoo Sports he has been buying supplements from the founder of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-operative (Balco) for 18 months. He also claims he never has asked Conte whether any of the substances he is using are banned.
NEWS
November 16, 2007 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barry Bonds, baseball's No. 1 home-run hitter as well as its No.1 dilemma, was indicted yesterday on charges he lied to a federal grand jury investigating athletes' use of performance-enhancing drugs supplied by the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative (Balco). The long-anticipated indictment, unsealed in San Francisco, likely will trigger an earthquake in major league baseball, where speculation about steroid use among its elite stars has hovered like a dark cloud. "While everyone in America is considered innocent until proven guilty," commissioner Bud Selig, who has empowered former U.S. Sen. George Mitchell to head a steroid probe, said in a statement, "I take this indictment very seriously and will follow its progress closely.
SPORTS
October 24, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Victor Conte, the founder of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative, believes Barry Bonds won't be indicted. Conte spent 4 months in prison after pleading guilty in July 2005 to steroid distribution and money laundering. He denies providing Bonds with performance-enhancing drugs. A grand jury has been investigating whether Bonds committed perjury when he testified he never knowingly took performance-enhancing drugs. "I don't believe that they have the evidence to indict Barry Bonds," Conte said yesterday in New York while attending a book-release party for "Steroid Nation" by Shaun Assael, for which he was interviewed extensively.
SPORTS
April 19, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
The head athletic trainer for the San Francisco Giants was told to appear before a federal grand jury investigating whether Barry Bonds lied about his connection to the BALCO steroids scandal, a newspaper reported. Stan Conte, who is not related to Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative owner Victor Conte, was subpoenaed to appear in a San Francisco federal courtroom on April 27, the San Francisco Chronicle reported yesterday, citing anonymous sources familiar with the investigation.
SPORTS
February 1, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Barry Bonds is expected to miss much of spring training following arthroscopic surgery yesterday on his right knee, but the San Francisco Giants slugger should recover in plenty of time to resume his chase of Hank Aaron's home run record in April. The seven-time National League MVP had a "minor arthritis cleanup," the Giants said in statement. Dr. Arthur Ting also repaired a small tear in Bonds' meniscus. Giants trainer Stan Conte expects Bonds to return for at least the final 2 weeks of spring training, and the 40-year-old should be back to full strength before Opening Day. "It's not a situation where I'm concerned for him," Conte said.
SPORTS
January 27, 2005 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
FBI agents raided the home of alleged steroid dealer Victor Conte and seized e-mail and other records yesterday as part of an investigation of grand jury testimony leaks in a broad sports-doping scandal, according to newspaper reports. At least a dozen agents raided Conte's San Mateo, Calif., home before 8 a.m., and within four hours seized a computer, cellular phone and lab records belonging to the founder of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative, the San Francisco Chronicle and San Jose Mercury News reported on their Web sites.
SPORTS
November 20, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
The founder of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative alleged the government fabricated statements that suggested he provided steroids to top athletes, according to federal court documents filed yesterday. "I very clearly told all four of the law enforcement officers present that I would not cooperate with them in any way, regarding any of the physicians, coaches or athletes involved with BALCO Laboratories," Victor Conte said in the documents. The documents dispute statements the government said Conte made when agents raided his Burlingame nutritional supplement business in September 2003.
SPORTS
October 17, 2004 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
A man identified by the San Francisco Chronicle as Barry Bonds' personal trainer says in a taped conversation that the San Francisco Giants slugger used an undetectable performance-enhancing drug during the 2003 season, the newspaper reported. The person identified as trainer Greg Anderson, 38, Bonds' longtime friend and a defendant in the Balco steroids conspiracy case, also says on the recording that he expected to receive advance warning before Bonds had to submit to a drug test, according to the paper.
SPORTS
June 25, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Tim Montgomery testified last year that he used human growth hormone and an undetectable steroid, and that the man at the center of a Bay area steroid scandal told him he supplied Barry Bonds with performance-enhancing drugs, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. The newspaper's report yesterday includes direct quotes from Montgomery's testimony to the federal grand jury that investigated the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative. The Chronicle did not say how it obtained the information.
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