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NEWS
May 14, 2009 | By John Grant
The Pentagon has launched a $13 million marketing experiment at the Franklin Mills Mall in Northeast Philadelphia. It's an effort to sell the Army as a brand, like Disney, and it could one day be replicated in malls all over America. It's called the Army Experience Center, and it was recently confronted by 200 angry citizens from around the mid-Atlantic region, seven of whom were arrested. Their beef was the center's use of tax dollars to assemble what amounts to a sophisticated trap.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1988 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hey, vidkid. Flick on the old TV and get ready to play a fast, giddy, desperate game of Who Gets the Billions in the wild and crazy video-games industry. That's right, video games. You know, the things you popped into your video system in the early '80s and played on your TV - until you and millions of other vidkids got bored and sent the industry into a tailspin. Well, vidkid, that's changed. The most dramatic nose-diver in the history of the electronics industry is making the most dramatic comeback since Lazarus.
NEWS
December 1, 2002 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Twenty years ago, in the nation's most popular video game, players controlled a little yellow circle named Pac-Man, which roamed around a maze eating dots while battling colorful blobs named Inky and Blinky. In the best-selling and most widely rented game of the 2002 holiday season, a player assumes the role of a drug dealer and car thief who is rewarded for committing crimes. By pressing the proper buttons on a Sony PlayStation 2 controller, the player can hire a prostitute, then kill her to get his money back; or assault a pedestrian with a golf club, carjack the ambulance that comes to save the victim, and use the vehicle to run over police.
NEWS
September 8, 2000 | by Collin Keefe, For the Daily News
Like a cross between the robot-hustling Jawas in "Star Wars" and Santa's little helpers, Todd Tuckey and his small staff work day and night, six days a week, rebuilding and refurbishing arcade classics like Pac Man, Centipede, Defender and Galaxian. Tuckey's TNT Amusements is selling more video games than ever before. And he's selling these games for twice as much as he was two years ago. But no one seems to be complaining. Business is so good, in fact, that he's stopped advertising and at times actually turns prospective customers away.
NEWS
April 14, 2004 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was 6 in the morning when Karen Kosoy discovered her kindergartner still glued to the Nintendo game - he'd stayed up all night trying to rescue a legendary princess named Zelda. "My God, he's addicted," she remembers thinking. Jamie Kosoy has his own memory: His mother pulled the plug and threw the video game player in the trash. "The most traumatic moment of my life," he says. By middle school, while friends were playing street hockey outside, Kosoy was rushing indoors to chart their stats on his computer.
NEWS
July 20, 2008 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
Pennsylvania State University Great Valley is an unlikely setting for a summer camp. There's no swing set or baseball field on campus, just two buildings, with a few benches out front for graduate students to take lunch or cigarette breaks during the day. The graduate campus is hosting a summer camp for the sixth straight summer, however, albeit an unusual one. The VideoGame.Net Summer Camp Experience will give sixth through 12th graders a crash course in video-game making through mid-August.
NEWS
December 23, 1993 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ah, the holidays. The season of love, joy, peace and Mortal Kombat, Lethal Enforcers and Street Fighter. These last three are the titles of video games sought by many shoppers willing to stand in line under speakers musically proclaiming "good will to man" to get their hands on video games whose labels promise they "show no mercy. " But does all this video violence provoke violence? The verdict is still out. "There are studies," said psychologist Patrick McGuffin, "that say 70 percent of all video games have a violent theme, but there are no studies that have proved that watching violence in any form - video games, television, movies or music videos - causes someone to be violent," said McGuffin, of Upper Providence Township.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2005 | By Hannah Davis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Where some people see cartoons, others see modern art. Anime, the genre of animated film that came of age in the 1960s in Japan, has taken its time finding a mainstream American audience. It's a step up from Saturday morning Looney Tunes, and loyal fans have seen its popularity rise in the United States over more than two decades. To bring the anime community in Philly together, a small group of fans is putting on the fourth KosaiKon AniFest at Villanova University's Bartley Hall on Saturday.
NEWS
July 11, 1995 | By Suzette Hackney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
About 20 children, chanting and carrying signs demanding the freedom to play video games at the borough's swim club, protested before the start of the Borough Council meeting last night as members arrived. The protesters, members of the swimming and diving team, chanted, "We want our games back," and held up signs that said "Why are you taking away our games?" and "$300 is nuts. " The group was responding to a tax ordinance that the borough recently began enforcing, charging all profitable organizations $300 per mechanical game per year.
NEWS
November 24, 2004 | By Charles Homans INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
This season's blockbuster video games give players the opportunity to hijack cars, mow down the walking undead with heavy artillery, and ogle topless women. But gamers too young for such content may find little else. "I think it's a little bit scary that the best games coming onto the market that we're all talking about are the very violent first-person shooters," said David Walsh, president of the National Institute on Media and the Family. The nonprofit watchdog group released its annual video- game report card yesterday.
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