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Video System

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NEWS
March 18, 1996 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Judge Cornelius Sullivan's range of expressions could cause orchids to bloom and bad guys to wilt. Soon, the bad guys won't have to be in the same courtroom with Sullivan when he scowls at them. Sometime this week, the five video cameras mounted on the walls of his seventh-floor courtroom in Superior Court will be turned on to record some of the minor proceedings Sullivan oversees. And next month, the daily influx in Sullivan's courtroom of recently arrested prisoners in orange jumpsuits will end. Sullivan will preside over their "first appearances" while they - and he - are sitting before video cameras at opposite ends of a fiber-optic cable, the prisoners in the jail and the judge in his courtroom.
NEWS
July 27, 2000 | By Leonard N. Fleming, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Burlington County freeholders yesterday approved the purchase of video teleconferencing equipment to link two county jails with participating municipal courts for a prisoner's initial appearance hearing. County officials say the pilot program, which will cost the county an estimated $20,000, will cut down on municipalities using police officers to transport defendants between the facilities. The county and Burlington County Superior Court will pay $10,000 each for the TV monitors, VCRs, cameras and microphones to go into the detention facility in Mount Holly and the minimum-security building in Pemberton Township.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1988 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some call it a great advance. Others say it is a giant step backwards. Whatever, the federal court in Philadelphia is ready to explore the technological frontier. On Friday, U.S. District Court in Philadelphia was selected as one of four federal courts in the nation to participate in a two-year experiment in which video cameras rather than stenographers will be used to record daily court proceedings. A subcommittee of the Judicial Conference of the United States, which oversees federal court administration, made the choice in Orlando, Fla., where it was meeting to decide on a number of improvements in the federal court system, according to Dave Sellers, a spokesman for the Administrative Office of the United States Courts.
LIVING
August 30, 1987 | By Harry Somerfield, Special to The Inquirer
The video industry is taking aim at a new market - still photography. You may have noticed that names traditionally associated with the photography industry (such as Canon, Kodak and Konica) have begun appearing on video equipment. Now these companies, as well as electronics giants Sony and Casio, are inventing a new field - still video. Simply put, it uses video technology to store still pictures on magnetic tape disks instead of photographic film. Still video is new, high-tech and, for the time being at least, quite expensive.
NEWS
January 20, 1998 | By Todd Bishop, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Police Officer Charles Rantin raised the black-plated barrel of a 9mm pistol, his eyes intently on the scuffle before him. Several paces away, in a suburban backyard, a man and woman wrestled for control of a knife that glinted in the midday sun. The woman yelled for help. Then, abruptly, the man broke free. Gripping the knife's handle, he charged toward the officer, flashing the exposed blade. Rantin squeezed the trigger. A shot echoed through the air. The assailant fell to the ground.
NEWS
April 2, 2009
Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey may have a cancer undermining the broader integrity of his department. If so, he needs to remove it quickly and forcefully. Some owners of small bodegas are telling disturbingly similar tales of police drug raids that begin with the destruction of their private surveillance cameras and end with the looting of cash and merchandise from their shops. A Daily News investigation turned up video of one raid in September 2007 at a bodega in West Oak Lane that shows narcotics officers busy shutting off the store's surveillance cameras.
SPORTS
January 20, 2011 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Phillies have opted to supersize and enhance their video system at Citizens Bank Park. According to a release the team sent out Wednesday, the Phillies are in the midst of a $10 million upgrade that will include an enormous new HD-15 video display screen in left field. Sony Electronics' System Solutions Group and Daktronics are working on the high-definition project. The new video system will be on display to the public for the first time when the Phillies host the Pittsburgh Pirates in two exhibition games, on March 29 and 30. The Phillies said their new HD display will be the largest in the National League and among the largest in the world, measuring 76 feet high and 97 feet wide.
NEWS
August 2, 1992 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Peter G. Brown, 53, a scientist and civil rights advocate who enjoyed working as a handyman, died suddenly Thursday at Lankenau Hospital. He lived in Wynnewood. At the time of his death, Mr. Brown was an associate director of scientific meetings and telecommunications at Wyeth-Ayerst Pharmaceutical in Radnor. In that capacity he was involved in setting up a global meeting system for the company. "We were supposed to go to Paris next week," said his wife, Esther. "He was working to get a video system in place there.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1988 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hey, vidkid. Flick on the old TV and get ready to play a fast, giddy, desperate game of Who Gets the Billions in the wild and crazy video-games industry. That's right, video games. You know, the things you popped into your video system in the early '80s and played on your TV - until you and millions of other vidkids got bored and sent the industry into a tailspin. Well, vidkid, that's changed. The most dramatic nose-diver in the history of the electronics industry is making the most dramatic comeback since Lazarus.
NEWS
December 1, 1997 | by Sara Eckel
Imagine how you would feel if you discovered your employer was reading your e-mail and listening in on your phone calls. Imagine how you would feel if your comings and goings in the office were watched by video cameras and electronic sensors. And think of how you would react if your boss reserved the right to inspect your body fluids. Sound like an Orwellian nightmare? Actually, it's merely a description of many workplaces across the United States. Because as technology becomes more sophisticated, many employers are finding new ways to monitor employee behavior.
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NEWS
September 16, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
For most of the last nine years, the $52,000 camera system in West Deptford's police cruisers functioned well. It recorded intoxicated drivers swerving through lanes or later stumbling on their feet. Sometimes the footage helped prevent lengthy drags through the court system, because, as West Deptford Prosecutor John Moustakas said, "You really don't have a defense. " But in the last year, the cameras began begging for repairs, much like an outdated laptop. Some recorded audio but no video, or vice versa.
NEWS
September 25, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The President's House is broken. That should not come as a surprise to most of the tens of thousands of visitors who have passed through the exhibition and slavery memorial on Independence Mall. More often than not, they've been greeted by blank video screens. In fact, since "The President's House: Freedom and Slavery in the Making of a New Nation" opened to the public in December 2010, key elements of the exhibition have not functioned properly. The video screens, which tell much of the story of enslaved Africans associated with the site, repeatedly have shuddered and died.
SPORTS
January 20, 2011 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Phillies have opted to supersize and enhance their video system at Citizens Bank Park. According to a release the team sent out Wednesday, the Phillies are in the midst of a $10 million upgrade that will include an enormous new HD-15 video display screen in left field. Sony Electronics' System Solutions Group and Daktronics are working on the high-definition project. The new video system will be on display to the public for the first time when the Phillies host the Pittsburgh Pirates in two exhibition games, on March 29 and 30. The Phillies said their new HD display will be the largest in the National League and among the largest in the world, measuring 76 feet high and 97 feet wide.
NEWS
April 2, 2009
Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey may have a cancer undermining the broader integrity of his department. If so, he needs to remove it quickly and forcefully. Some owners of small bodegas are telling disturbingly similar tales of police drug raids that begin with the destruction of their private surveillance cameras and end with the looting of cash and merchandise from their shops. A Daily News investigation turned up video of one raid in September 2007 at a bodega in West Oak Lane that shows narcotics officers busy shutting off the store's surveillance cameras.
NEWS
June 13, 2006 | By John Podesta and William S. Sessions
As technological advances turn the unimaginable into the everyday, ensuring the continued protection of civil liberties, privacy and security becomes ever more complicated. A growing number of communities have installed - or are considering - public video surveillance systems. These efforts gained momentum after 9/11, both as anticrime and antiterrorism measures. Philadelphia is no exception. In a May 16 referendum, residents overwhelmingly approved the installation of a video surveillance system.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2006 | By Rob Watson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The big talk before this week's Electronic Entertainment Expo was the name Nintendo chose for its new console, Wii. The electronic gaming world was either chuckling or confused. But then Sony announced the price of its new console on Monday. The laughing stopped, but the head-scratching continued. Six hundred bucks! That's what Sony Computer Entertainment CEO Kaz Hirai anounced would be the price for his company's top-of-the-line PlayStation 3. The no-frills model, which will have a smaller hard drive and no built-in wireless capabilities, will sell for $499.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2005 | By Rob Watson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the world of video game consoles, there is no doubt who rules the ring. Sony's PlayStation 2 has all the belts, throws more punches than Roy Jones Jr. in his prime, and has a crowd of millions behind it. But the advent of the next generation of game machines is upon us. While Sony and Nintendo are busy developing their new consoles for 2006 releases (see sidebar), Microsoft will throw the first blow Tuesday with the Xbox 360, its second effort in the home-gaming arena. And hard-core players can't wait.
SPORTS
August 5, 2004 | By Ray Parrillo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Late in the first half of last year's Penn State-Minnesota game, a pass by Nittany Lions quarterback Michael Robinson was ruled an interception, even though the video replay clearly indicated the ball hit the ground before the defender pulled it in. Minnesota turned the play into a field goal en route to a 20-14 victory, worsening a miserable season during which Penn State went 3-9 and further inflaming coach Joe Paterno, who during the 2002...
NEWS
March 1, 2004 | By RICHARD C. GILLIAM
LIKE thousands of Philadelphians, I mourn the death of Faheem Thomas-Childs. I too am the father of a 10-year old-son, and Faheem's horrific death is every parent's worst nightmare. As someone who thinks seriously about public policy, I've asked myself one question: What can we do to better protect our children going to and from school? My solution is simple. It's time for Philadelphia to look seriously at video surveillance of safe corridors for our children. No one is more sensitive to the civil-liberties implications of this suggestion than I. But the state of domestic terrorism that some communities face is considerable; I believe a critical mass exists to examine new solutions to protect our children.
NEWS
October 26, 2000 | By Marc Schogol and Erika Hobbs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
If you're just now reading this, you're probably too late. Too late to beat the rush and crush for one of the limited number of Sony PlayStation 2 video-game systems going on sale today. Because Sony has so far been able to make only 500,000 of the next-generation toys, and because they're likely to be in short supply through the holiday season, throngs were expected to camp out and queue up long before dawn. These things are, for the moment, the ultimate toy story - the system for video-game fanatics young and old, with truly cosmic graphics.
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