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Video Technology

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LIVING
August 30, 1987 | By Harry Somerfield, Special to The Inquirer
The video industry is taking aim at a new market - still photography. You may have noticed that names traditionally associated with the photography industry (such as Canon, Kodak and Konica) have begun appearing on video equipment. Now these companies, as well as electronics giants Sony and Casio, are inventing a new field - still video. Simply put, it uses video technology to store still pictures on magnetic tape disks instead of photographic film. Still video is new, high-tech and, for the time being at least, quite expensive.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
One defendant asked if he could have an ice cream cake at his next court appearance, since it fell on his 20th birthday. Another, locked up for attempting to steal an $8.53 backpack, had been in jail for retail theft five times in the last year. A third man had been stabbed in a Chinese restaurant, then staggered up the street bleeding profusely. For collapsing in someone's home, he was charged with attempted trespass and attempted burglary and, because he had three open cases pending trial, held on $10,000 bail.
NEWS
March 1, 2004 | By RICHARD C. GILLIAM
LIKE thousands of Philadelphians, I mourn the death of Faheem Thomas-Childs. I too am the father of a 10-year old-son, and Faheem's horrific death is every parent's worst nightmare. As someone who thinks seriously about public policy, I've asked myself one question: What can we do to better protect our children going to and from school? My solution is simple. It's time for Philadelphia to look seriously at video surveillance of safe corridors for our children. No one is more sensitive to the civil-liberties implications of this suggestion than I. But the state of domestic terrorism that some communities face is considerable; I believe a critical mass exists to examine new solutions to protect our children.
NEWS
September 6, 1988 | By BARBARA BECK, Daily News Staff Writer
Pulse pounding, Al Francis rushed his granddaughter into the house, raced back to the patio, looked through the viewfinder and began shooting. Without premeditation, without really aiming, within a matter of seconds, it was over. All he could see now was the smoke curling into the California sky. Only when it cleared did he learn he had videotaped the death dive of an Aeromexico airliner over Cerritos, Calif., another horrifying image captured by an amateur with a home video camera.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By ANN HORNADAY, Washington Post
PART POLITICAL procedural, part seamlessly re-created time capsule, Pablo Larrain's "No" re-visits Chile in 1988, when brutal dictator Augusto Pinochet - under pressure from the international community - held a plebiscite on his leadership, which he had seized in a coup in 1973. "No" follows the quixotic advertising campaign mounted to remove Pinochet from power. Gael Garcia Bernal stars as Rene Saavedra, a brash young advertising executive who masterminds a media strategy that infused an inherently negative word ("no")
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2012 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
You never really expected the gangly kid from 3rd Rock from the Sun to become a handsome icon of cool: a romantic indie-flick lead in (500) Days of Summer , a sharp supporting actor in Lincoln and The Dark Knight Rises , a quirky action hero in Looper . That's Joseph Gordon-Levitt. At 31, he's got the got the acting chops, good looks, and hipster-geek demeanor to lead a mini-revolution. That's exactly what he tried to do on Monday when he sold out the Merriam Theater as the front man of hitRECord.
SPORTS
April 5, 2012 | BY ALEX LEE, Daily News Staff Writer
NEW FIELD reporter Gregg Murphy won't be the only addition to the Phillies' broadcast experience this season on Comcast SportsNet. CSN, which will air 109 games, is ramping up its coverage by utilizing state-of-the-art video technology, which it calls "Ultra-Mo," to provide clearer slow-motion replays. "It is crystal clear," says Shawn Oleksiak, CSN's senior executive producer of live events. Oleksiak says that normal video is captured at 30 frames per second. Ultra-Mo uses a varied, or adjusted, frame rate, enabling more frames per second, which allows clarity on replays that previously was unavailable.
NEWS
February 26, 1996 | By Claude Lewis
The rape-murder of 26-year-old jogger Kimberly Ernest last fall is the latest example of the need by police and prosecutors to utilize video cameras to help solve many criminal cases. This inexpensive technology could save millions of dollars by reducing claims by criminal suspects who recant their signed confessions and who assert their statements resulted from physical abuse, intimidation and coercion. In recent days, lawyers for both suspects in Ernest's death - Richard Wise and Herbert Haak 3d - have raised questions about the validity of their signed confessions.
NEWS
September 25, 1995 | By Rebecca Goldsmith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Burlington County is poised to link its courts and jails by video - a move that freeholders say would cut the costs of transporting inmates - but some prisoners' advocates and municipal officials are skeptical about the plan. By mid-October, the freeholders expect to award a bid of up to $250,000 for five sets of video cameras and TV screens to link county inmates charged with serious crimes with a Superior Court room in Mount Holly. The technology would also be used to connect inmates who are arrested on lesser charges with a special judge who would hear municipal cases two or three days a week.
NEWS
May 29, 1988 | By Marilou Regan, Special to The Inquirer
If you tune in to the educational channel on American Cablevision, you might see a rock video that looks as if it belongs on MTV or is a takeoff on Sesame Street - in Spanish. You may also see a news program called Kid's News that is hosted and partly written by elementary school students, or a cooking show starring high school students with their favorite recipes. All these programs were produced by the Springfield School District, which is in the forefront among Delaware County schools that are tuning into today's video technology to teach students about the high-tech world of the future.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 4, 2013
Tale of the tape bests eye witness In clearing Tahmir Craig of the Chester shooting death of Devon Williams, the prosecutor played fair and square and kept investigating, and technology showed what the naked eye missed: Craig was not the man visible in a murder-scene video ("No longer jailed in Delco," March 21). But the news isn't all good. After all, Craig was jailed for more than nine months, based primarily on video identification by a neighborhood store owner of a different race.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By ANN HORNADAY, Washington Post
PART POLITICAL procedural, part seamlessly re-created time capsule, Pablo Larrain's "No" re-visits Chile in 1988, when brutal dictator Augusto Pinochet - under pressure from the international community - held a plebiscite on his leadership, which he had seized in a coup in 1973. "No" follows the quixotic advertising campaign mounted to remove Pinochet from power. Gael Garcia Bernal stars as Rene Saavedra, a brash young advertising executive who masterminds a media strategy that infused an inherently negative word ("no")
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can a video lie? Should it get the last word? Is it always or ever subject to interpretation? Can a million people on YouTube see what they believe to be a Philadelphia police officer striking a woman to the ground and a judge see something else? "This is not a social media contest," Philadelphia Municipal Court Judge Patrick F. Dugan said after finding former Lt. Jonathan Josey not guilty of doing what the viral video seemed to show he had done: strike a woman during last year's Puerto Rican Day festivities.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2012 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
You never really expected the gangly kid from 3rd Rock from the Sun to become a handsome icon of cool: a romantic indie-flick lead in (500) Days of Summer , a sharp supporting actor in Lincoln and The Dark Knight Rises , a quirky action hero in Looper . That's Joseph Gordon-Levitt. At 31, he's got the got the acting chops, good looks, and hipster-geek demeanor to lead a mini-revolution. That's exactly what he tried to do on Monday when he sold out the Merriam Theater as the front man of hitRECord.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
One defendant asked if he could have an ice cream cake at his next court appearance, since it fell on his 20th birthday. Another, locked up for attempting to steal an $8.53 backpack, had been in jail for retail theft five times in the last year. A third man had been stabbed in a Chinese restaurant, then staggered up the street bleeding profusely. For collapsing in someone's home, he was charged with attempted trespass and attempted burglary and, because he had three open cases pending trial, held on $10,000 bail.
SPORTS
April 5, 2012 | BY ALEX LEE, Daily News Staff Writer
NEW FIELD reporter Gregg Murphy won't be the only addition to the Phillies' broadcast experience this season on Comcast SportsNet. CSN, which will air 109 games, is ramping up its coverage by utilizing state-of-the-art video technology, which it calls "Ultra-Mo," to provide clearer slow-motion replays. "It is crystal clear," says Shawn Oleksiak, CSN's senior executive producer of live events. Oleksiak says that normal video is captured at 30 frames per second. Ultra-Mo uses a varied, or adjusted, frame rate, enabling more frames per second, which allows clarity on replays that previously was unavailable.
NEWS
November 15, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
A 21st-century micro-symphony? An extremely eventful fanfare? A soundtrack to a yet-to-be-made film? All such descriptions apply to Tan Dun's Internet Symphony No. 1 ("Eroica") , which, typical of this composer, is as interesting to explain as it is to hear. Tan conducted the local premiere Friday as part of the Philadelphia Orchestra's multimedia Sound Waves series, along with The Map, his 2002 concerto for cello, video, and orchestra, which has aged in curious ways since last heard here five years ago. The Internet Symphony warrants a reprieve from the unwritten rule that composers should never talk about a piece for longer than it takes to perform.
NEWS
August 2, 2009 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Out on a walking tour of the city last week, Michelle Davis, Rhiana Pettenati, and Michelle Gailey strolled around City Hall (very nice) and LOVE Park (ditto), then pushed through the revolving doors into the refrigerated lobby of the glass skyscraper at 17th Street and JFK Boulevard. The women were confused. Some guy they'd met at a party the night before had told them, "Your life is not complete until you see the Comcast Center's video wall. " So here they were, and all they were looking at was a corporate-sleek, wood-paneled surface - 83.3 feet wide by 25.4 feet high, to be exact - above the three hallways leading to the building's innards.
NEWS
June 27, 2005 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 15,000 educators and technology vendors are in town this week to talk about the latest developments in educational technology. Blogging by teachers, new ways to test students online, and examples of classrooms of the future will be featured during the National Educational Computing Conference, which runs through Thursday. "If you want to get the best overview of what is happening with cutting-edge educational technology in the United States and the world, NECC is the place to do that," said Don Knezek, chief executive officer of the International Society for Technology in Education.
NEWS
June 10, 2004 | By Lawrence Husick
Residents of the Tredyffrin-Easttown School District can tune to cable Channel 14 (TETV) to see recorded meetings of their school board. The access provided is excellent, with many reruns to ensure that any interested resident may be informed. The board has also gone out of its way to promote information dissemination on the Internet by publishing agendas, reports and minutes on its Web site (www.tesd.k12.pa.us) and in a free e-mail list. All this puts Tredyffrin-Easttown at the forefront of openness, as noted in recent news articles about telecasts of government meetings.
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