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NEWS
October 26, 1986 | By Nino LoBello, Special to The Inquirer
When Vienna's Volksoper gives a performance of Ralph Benatzky's sweet, lighthearted operetta Im Weissen Rossl, a musical extravaganza that by no standard compares to any of the Johann Strauss or Franz Lehar masterpieces, it becomes the hottest ticket in town. The Viennese go en masse to the Benatzky show, with its overdose of schmaltz, because it gives them a chance to go back to the good old days when life was merry and there wasn't a care in the world, or so it seemed. But more important, the "hero" of the operetta is the Emperor Franz Josef, who, when he arrives on the scene in a lake boat, decked out in his pompous, medaled uniform and famous sidebars, receives a sustained outburst of applause from the Viennese.
NEWS
May 1, 1994 | By Kimberly Heinrichs, FOR THE INQUIRER
Most visitors to the Imperial Palace, seat of the old Austro-Hungarian Empire, come to take in the Flemish tapestries and portraits of such ill-fated Hapsburg family notables as Marie Antoinette and Archduke Franz Ferdinand. But across the courtyard from the Royal Apartments and up five flights of stairs is a little-known museum dedicated to a little-spoken language some people still hope will eventually sweep the world. At the palace, streams of tourists line up to pay 25 schillings - a couple of dollars - to visit the royal living and sleeping rooms, and shell out 40 schillings more for the self-guided tour booklet in their language of choice.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
It is usually actors who talk about undertaking roles that are a "stretch" from their repertoire. But for James F. Pyne Jr., a resident designer now in his 14th season at The People's Light and Theater Company in Malvern, The Devil and All His Works has presented its own challenges. "This show is definitely the most ambitious thing we've done from a physical production standpoint," Pyne said of the play set in 1895 Vienna. "It was the biggest stretch for me - I normally don't design in this style.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1986 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
As British writer John Berger posits in his seminal essay, "The Moment of Cubism," major aesthetic upheavals reflect deeper revolutionary currents in the general society. Berger's essay points up a simple but frequently overlooked truth - that art is not divorced from life, as we so often perceive it to be, but an integral component of daily existence, even if the relationship isn't always readily apparent. The new exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, "Vienna 1900: Art, Architecture and Design," doesn't have anything to do with cubism, but in its illumination of a culture teetering nervously on the cusp of the modern era, it recalls Berger's thesis.
NEWS
January 22, 1989 | By Zofia Smardz, Special to The Inquirer
It was a new sign, at the side of the airport highway (also new), and to a longtime lover of Vienna like me, it was a bit of a shock. "Wien ist Happy dass Du kommst," it said in tall white letters on a bright red board. Wien ist Happy? What language was that? Certainly not the precise, proper German of the gracious old dowager city I knew. In that Vienna, custodian of the highest Germanic culture and tradition, any billboard welcoming visitors would have declared correctly, if pompously: "Wien freut sich, Sie herzlich willkommen zu heissen" (Vienna is pleased to welcome you)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1987 | By TOM DI NARDO, Daily News Classical Music Writer
Austria and the city of Vienna are offering Philadelphia a unique gift for its "We the People 200" celebration in the form of a newly composed mass. The work, by young Viennese musician Roland Baumgartner, is titled "Missa Pacis" (Mass of Peace). The mass will be given its world performance on July 1 at the Academy of Music, with possible performances several days later at the Kennedy Center in Washington. Its many styles and varied non-denominational sections were chosen by the composer to emphasize the diversity of musical cultures among the peoples of the world.
NEWS
September 30, 1986 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The musical ferment in turn-of-the-century Vienna was the end of something or the beginning of something, and the Swarthmore Music and Dance Festival spent its first concerts helping audiences decide which. In this segment's final concert, held Sunday, the program at Lang Concert Hall viewed the ferment in terms of song. James Freeman chose songs by Brahms and Schoenberg, but it was Schoenberg's Pierrot Lunaire that held chief interest. In that 21-song cycle, Schoenberg said goodbye to traditional melody and vocal technique in a search for a musical language capable of expressing deeper meanings.
NEWS
April 3, 1988 | By Steve Birnbaum, Special to The Inquirer
We're going to visit Hungary in July, then we'd like to go from Budapest to Vienna by steamer on the Danube. Can you tell us how long the trip takes? Do we need overnight accommodations? What will the price be; do we need reservations? How should we book passage? Although there are a few options for a Danube cruise from Vienna to Budapest - anywhere from a 12-hour, one-way trip to a meandering one-week round trip - the same is not true in the opposite direction. The upstream currents make a cruise impractical for a trip in one day. There is a paddlewheel steamer, the SS Schoenbrunn, that goes from Vienna to Budapest in 12 hours (9 a.m. to 9 p.m.)
NEWS
May 9, 1992 | By Louis Hau, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mark Bruce Dworkin, 42, a Camden native and chairman of the department of molecular biology at the Ernst Boehringer Institute of Vienna, Austria, died April 30 of cancer in Vienna. Dr. Dworkin graduated from Cherry Hill High School West in 1967. He earned a bachelor's degree in mathematics at the University of Wisconsin at Madison in 1971 and received his doctorate in biology in 1976 from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn. He completed post-doctoral work in biochemistry at the Carnegie Institution in Baltimore, the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., and the University of California at Davis.
NEWS
August 9, 1989 | BY FREDERIC MORTON From the New York Times
On a midsummer night two years ago, Felix S. Bloch and I sat in a parked car on a deserted street in Vienna and talked about something concerning us both. Today, the setting reeks of conspiracy. Yet the conversation was not. We had met a few hours earlier under impeccably normal circumstances. Bloch, then deputy chief of the American Embassy (and today America's most famous spy suspect), was leaving his post under what was thought to be routine rotation. That evening, a senior official of the Austrian Foreign Ministry had given Bloch the sort of farewell party that normally marks the departure of a top diplomat.
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NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
VIENNA - The old saying "The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there" definitely applies to what was probably the most important concert of the Philadelphia Orchestra's 2015 European tour. This city, nurturer of composers from Haydn through Schoenberg, truly seems to have its time-warp zones, starting with the Musikverein, its famous concert hall, where capitulation to the past is necessary for any 21st-century orchestra playing a program of composers the Viennese claim as their own: Beethoven and Brahms and (to a lesser extent)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
The silver candlesticks with trumpet bases may be slender and simple, but they have a hefty tale to tell. Come Wednesday at sundown, the start of the Jewish high holy days, those candlesticks will speak volumes when they are center stage on Jeffrey and Barbara Kutscher's holiday table in Moorestown. When Rosh Hashanah comes around next year, the candlesticks will be in a home in Bucks County, or possibly in the Baltimore area. In each new place, their impact will be deeply felt.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
If ever there was a production that illustrated just how problematic Shakespeare's "problem plays" can be, it's the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival's Measure for Measure , directed by Fontaine Syer. Syer sets the action in the Vienna of 1900, a city at the top of its cultural game, blossoming as a center of art and design, particularly art nouveau, but also in the year seeing the publication of Freud's The Interpretation of Dreams . Marla Jurglanis' costumes don't reflect art nouveau's flowing, sensuous curves, but that's not what the play's about anyway.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2013
Museum Hours A guard at Vienna's Kunsthistorisches Art Museum explores life, his home city, and the impact of art with a foreign visitor, in Jem Cohen's film. (No MPAA rating, Ritz Bourse)
NEWS
July 4, 2013 | By Carlos Valdez, Associated Press
LA PAZ, Bolivia - The plane carrying Bolivian President Evo Morales home from Russia was rerouted to Austria on Tuesday after France and Portugal refused to let it cross their airspace because of suspicions that NSA leaker Edward Snowden was on board, the country's foreign minister said. Foreign Minister David Choquehuanca denied that Snowden was on the plane, which landed in Vienna, and said France and Portugal would have to explain why they canceled authorization for the plane.
NEWS
January 26, 2013
Maria Schaumayer, 82, the Austrian Central Bank governor who went on to settle claims filed by Nazi slave-labor victims, died Wednesday, Jan. 23, in her Vienna apartment. The coroner's office gave no cause of death. Ms. Schaumayer was the first woman to lead a central bank in Europe, heading the Austrian institution from 1990 to 1995. After leaving the bank, she led the Austrian government's negotiations to compensate Nazi slave-labor victims. The government agreed in 2000 to pay out $394.5 million.
NEWS
October 14, 2012
Turhan Bey, 90, an actor whose exotic good looks earned him the nickname of "Turkish Delight" in films with Errol Flynn and Katharine Hepburn before he left Hollywood for a quieter life in Vienna, Austria, has died. Marita Ruiter, who exhibited Mr. Bey's photos in her Luxembourg gallery, told the Austria Press Agency on Tuesday that he had died in Vienna on Sept. 30 after a long struggle with Parkinson's disease and was cremated Monday. Born in Austria as Gilbert Selahettin Schultavey, the son of a Turkish diplomat, Mr. Bey assumed his stage name shortly after moving to the United States with his Jewish Czech mother from Vienna to escape the Nazis and being discovered by talent scouts from Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2012 | By Sheri Linden, Los Angeles Times
Beyond the economic and political ramifications of globalization, consider its effect on movie stories: the cross-cultural slice-and-dice, a la Babel , that too often passes for meaning and resonance. In 360 , the new border-hopping feature from City of God director Fernando Mereilles, the faux profundity runs deep, infecting nearly every exchange in each vignette, whether the setting is Berlin, Bratislava, or Paris. Mereilles avoids touristy shots of his multiple locations, yet any sense of realism is undone by contrivance.
NEWS
August 4, 2012
The internationally renowned Romanian pianist Mihaela Ursuleasa, 33, has been found dead in her apartment in Vienna. The musician's agent, Andreea Butucariu, said in a statement Friday that Ms. Ursuleasa died Thursday from the effects of a cerebral hemorrhage and asked for her family's privacy to be respected. Police in Vienna confirmed the cause of death. Butucariu told Romanian media that Ms. Ursuleasa had recently canceled two concerts in the Romanian capital, Bucharest, on unspecified health grounds.
NEWS
September 11, 2011 | By George Jahn, Associated Press
PETRONELL-CARNUNTUM, Austria - They lived in cells barely big enough to turn around in and usually fought until they died. This was the lot of those at a sensational scientific discovery unveiled this month: well-preserved ruins of a gladiator school in Austria. The Carnuntum ruins are part of a city of 50,000 people 28 miles east of Vienna that flourished about 1,700 years ago, a major military and trade outpost linking the far-flung Roman empire's Asian boundaries to its central and northern European lands.
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