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NEWS
May 30, 2010
William G. Behan Michael F. Bingham Lawrence J. Bolger Michael J. Crescenz Charles E. Diamond Thomas A. Duckett Herbert L. Farrington John J. Gallagher Charles L. Isley Gerald J. Kelly James P. Kelly James J. Kline Thomas J. Laughlin Louis R. Lordi William E. Lund James M. Lynch Thomas K. Lyons Leo J. Mangold John J. Murphy David C. Piotrowicz James M....
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1990 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Two tales of war top this week's list of video releases: a hard-bitten story of the consequences of the U.S. experience in Vietnam, and a straightforward look at how a few people labored to bring an explosive end to World War II. IN COUNTRY (1989) (Warner) $89.95. 120 minutes. Emily Lloyd, Bruce Willis, Kevin Anderson, Judith Ivey. Norman Jewison's work is the first second-generation Vietnam film. It considers the war's impact as much from the perspective of an orphaned teenage girl in rural Kentucky as from the viewpoint of burned-out veterans.
NEWS
July 17, 1993 | Inquirer photographs by April Saul
Protesters gathered outside City Hall yesterday to begin a 24-hour fast demanding the release of political prisoners in Vietnam. The Movement for Freedom and Democracy in Vietnam is organizing the demonstration.
NEWS
October 8, 1986
Charles Liteky, 55, has been fasting since Sept. 1 in front of the U.S. Capitol to protest intervention in Nicaragua. Mr. Liteky had received the Medal of Honor as an Army chaplain in Vietnam for having put his life on the line to save 20 wounded GIs. Now this brave man is again making a statement with his life by not eating until our government realizes we are in another Vietnam, with our military aid to the Nicaraguan contras. He has been joined in his fast by three other veterans.
NEWS
May 31, 1986 | By Edwin M. Yoder Jr
When President Reagan indulges in one of his casual commentaries on Vietnam - as he did in his Memorial Day remarks at Arlington National Cemetery - I usually find myself wishing he would say either a great deal more or a good deal less. At Arlington, the President noted (and it is true so far as it goes) that the burden of actually fighting that unpopular war fell to "the unpampered boys of the working class. " What more might he have said? Perhaps this: That in its eagerness to cushion the impact of the war on American public opinion, the Johnson administration declined to mobilize the reserves and tried to fight the war with draftees.
NEWS
March 22, 1986 | By James McCartney, Inquirer Washington Bureau
It was the long shadow of Vietnam, more than a decade after the final, inglorious American departure, that defeated President Reagan when the House of Representatives voted against military aid to the Nicaraguan rebels. Again and again, as the debate reached a climax on the House floor, the specter of American troops bogged down in an indecisive war haunted many members of the House - but especially the Democrats. For it was Democrats under President Lyndon Johnson who plunged the nation headlong into Vietnam 20 years ago. And many of them clearly don't want to risk a replay in Central America.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1990 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Over the heartbreaking course of Born on the Fourth of July, Ron Kovic is transformed from a crew-cut patriot to a long-haired protester against the war he once believed in. It was a war that left Kovic trapped in a wheelchair - a paralyzed veteran who became a potent symbol to a generation shattered in body and soul by Vietnam. Director Oliver Stone is a member of that generation, and a Vietnam vet himself. He vented his stored rage in Platoon; he's a filmmaker of unique and proven credentials on this subject.
NEWS
July 4, 1989 | By W. D. EHRHART
In the spring of 1966, at the age of 17, I enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps. Lyndon Johnson had only recently warned the American people that if we did not stop the communists in Vietnam, we would one day have to fight them on the sands of Waikiki, and the words of John Kennedy were still reverberating in my heart as if he'd spoken them directly to me: "Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country. " I was going to serve my country in Vietnam. I had never heard of Archimedes Patti or Christian de Castries, Edward Lansdale or the Binh Xuyen - key figures in the early stages of the Vietnam conflict.
NEWS
July 25, 1989 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
The three hospitalized Vietnam veterans in Pvt. Wars never talk about the war. But that traumatic conflict is the subject of James McLure's play, which is more interested in the damage inflicted on the American psyche than it is in battlefield wounds. The guys are all psycho cases, and their struggle to return to civilian life is frequently funny but basically tragic. Their plight and the nation's have the same subtext. This is a successful play in just about every respect. I saw and admired it first 10 years ago as a one-acter with McLure's wildly funny Lone Star at the annual new- play festival in Louisville, Ky. Since then, McLure has expanded Pvt. Wars to two acts, which are strongly sustained in this McCarter Theater Company summer production.
NEWS
February 3, 2013
Pham Duy, 91, Vietnam's most prolific songwriter, who captured the strength of his people through years of turbulence, and composed dozens of tunes after settling in California, died Jan. 27, from heart ailments after two operations, in Ho Chi Minh City, said his daughter Thai Hanh. Known as the "musician of 1,000 songs," Mr. Pham was revered by generations of Vietnamese, who memorized his melodies and taught them to their children and grandchildren. He led a musical dynasty that included his wife, diva Thai Hang, and eight children, who performed around the world as part of the band the Dreamers.
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NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Zoë Miller, Staff Writer
The stolen memorial flag of Seaman Patrick Corcoran, a 19-year-old from Philadelphia who died aboard the USS Frank E. Evans during the Vietnam War, was returned Monday to the scene of the July Fourth crime - the front porch of a North Wildwood home. On Monday, an unidentified young woman returned the flag, which was taken from a flagpole of a home owned by Tom and Lorraine Schaffer on East 11th Avenue. The woman then got back inside a car that was waiting outside the Schaffers' home and left.
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Zoë Miller, Staff Writer
The American flag presented to the family of Seaman Patrick M. Corcoran at his funeral nearly 50 years ago is still missing. And the family wants it back, no questions asked. The priceless object was stolen on July 4th from a flagpole outside a home next door to the Corcoran family's Shore house in North Wildwood. Patrick Corcoran, a Torresdale native who served in the Vietnam War, died at sea at age 19 with 73 other sailors when the Navy destroyer USS Frank E. Evans collided in 1969 with Australia's HMAS Melbourne, an aircraft carrier.
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
For nearly a decade, the family of Seaman Patrick M. Corcoran has flown an American flag outside its Jersey Shore home on special occasions to honor the Philadelphia native lost at sea during the Vietnam War. It was the flag presented to the family nearly 50 years ago at his funeral. But early on the morning of July 4, someone snatched the huge flag from a flagpole on East 11th Avenue in North Wildwood only hours after it had been hoisted for the holiday. Now there is outrage among not only the Corcoran family and Shore officials but also in the emotions shared in a social-media campaign started by neighbors and the town to immediately return the cherished heirloom - one of the family's only physical connections to Corcoran, who died aboard the USS Frank E. Evans in 1969.
NEWS
June 22, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
An East Camden community garden called Resilient Roots is helping nourish a neighborhood - and connect communities, cultures, and generations. "Taro, turmeric, lemongrass, ginger, and four different kinds of mint," says Lan Dinh, walking me through the rows, raised beds, and containers of lush crops on what had been a trash-strewn vacant lot at 29th and Cramer. "We have Asian squashes, gourds, bitter melons, and long beans," she says. "Edible chrysanthemum, sweet potato greens - we eat the greens - and Vietnamese corn.
NEWS
June 13, 2016
ISSUE | MUHAMMAD ALI Not a draft dodger or coward I served in the Navy during the 1960s. I have great respect for all who enlisted or were drafted into the military during that time in our history. The writer of the letter "The greatest coward" (Tuesday) is entitled to dislike Muhammad Ali, but he is not entitled to change the facts. Ali was never a draft dodger. He never fled the country or entered college to avoid the draft. Whether he refused to fight in Vietnam because of his convictions or his religion, he was ready to accept the consequences, and he was stripped of his heavyweight title.
TRAVEL
June 5, 2016
Answer: South China Sea. China has been active militarily in trying to expand its influence in the busy shipping route.
NEWS
May 31, 2016 | By Charles Krauthammer
How do you distinguish a foreign policy "idealist" from a "realist," an optimist from a pessimist? Ask one question: Do you believe in the arrow of history? Or to put it another way, do you think history is cyclical or directional? Are we condemned to do the same damn thing over and over, generation after generation - or is there hope for some enduring progress in the world order? For realists, generally conservative, history is an endless cycle of clashing power politics. The same patterns repeat.
TRAVEL
May 23, 2016 | By Bill Ecenbarger, For The Inquirer
SA DEC, Vietnam - The riverfront market is a throbbing chaos of sights, smells, and sounds. Little stalls of free enterprise proffer bananas, cucumbers, coconuts, carrots, mangoes, live chickens and ducks, skinned rats, pig eyes, giant prawns. Eels, crabs, and fish squirm in shallow metal tubs. Frogs and turtles wriggle in buckets. There is a heterogenous and resurgent stream of buyers and sellers. Vendors shout out the ripeness of their fruit. Wise-eyed shoppers sort through vegetables, seeking perfection.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
The prescription-drug addiction crisis has been more than two decades in the making. Now, all levels of government are scrambling to stop a public health disaster that Pennsylvania's top drug official described Tuesday as the worst since the 1918-19 flu. Meetings in Philadelphia highlighted the urgency, with physicians gathering in the morning and a top federal drug official appearing at another panel in the afternoon. Meanwhile, Gov. Wolf announced Tuesday that all public high schools will get free supplies of the drug Narcan to reverse overdoses of opioid painkillers and heroin.
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