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Vietnam Veterans Memorial

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NEWS
May 1, 2000 | By Lori Lessner, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
On a bright, warm Sunday 25 years after the fall of Saigon, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial drew veterans whose chilling memories had yet to fade, South Vietnamese who said the war was not over, and a new generation whose knowledge of the war came primarily from history class. They came bearing red roses, handwritten notes of love, even a pair of Army boots, in honor of the more than 58,000 Americans who died in a faraway country. One wreath bore pictures of Vietnamese babies airlifted out of the country by U.S. troops and later adopted in America.
NEWS
May 30, 1994 | By RICHARD L. NYGAARD
As we got out of our car on Constitution Avenue, my wife said, "I don't know just how I will feel about it. " Although it was my first visit to the Vietnam Veteran's Memorial, I thought to myself, "I do. " And as we walked across the lawn toward the Memorial a lump began to thicken in my throat. Every veteran I know who has visited here has felt the same - an extreme sadness. Why, I had often wondered, was that so? Other veterans' memorials stand in many cemeteries throughout the United States.
NEWS
November 16, 1986
I found the editorial cartoon of November 10 reprehensible. The Vietnam Veterans Memorial was not erected as a device for cartoonists to make political statements. The Vietnam Veterans Memorial is to honor those who served. Period. Michael Jude Gaudioso Sharon Hill.
NEWS
October 12, 1998 | SHARON GEKOSKI-KIMMEL / Inquirer Suburban Staff
Cris Walters of Barrington comforts her husband, Joe, in Pennsauken at the traveling "Wall That Heals," a replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Walters, who served in Vietnam, lost several friends there.
NEWS
December 26, 1990 | SAM PSORAS/DAILY NEWS
Frank Leidy, a veteran of the Vietnam War, and his wife Evelyn visit the Vietnam Veterans Memorial at Penn's Landing yesterday to decorate it with garland and 641 Christmas tree ornaments - one for each name on the memorial. Each ornament has a name attached, so the family can take it and put it on their Christmas tree at home.
NEWS
October 24, 1988 | MARK LUDAK/ DAILY NEWS
Hundreds gathered at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Penn's Landing on Saturday for an emotional ceremony in which the names of 11 men were added to the 630 Philadelphians killed in the Vietnam War. The 11 had been omitted for various reasons when the original monument was dedicated a year ago.
NEWS
April 29, 1991 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / RON TARVER
More than 4,000 people, most of whom arrived on motorcycle, gathered at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial near Penn's Landing yesterday to pay tribute to those still missing and unaccounted for years after the war. The motorcyclists came through Philadelphia and Montgomery County in a POW-MIA Awareness Parade.
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NEWS
May 26, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Army Master Sgt. Francis G. Corcoran was a "soldier's soldier," family members said. Corcoran enlisted at age 18, became a Green Beret, and volunteered to serve in Vietnam, where he received a Purple Heart and Bronze Star for valor after saving comrades' lives by disarming a bomb at great risk to himself. But his name never appeared on the gleaming black granite wall of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington - though he died in 1967 at age 39 from an illness contracted in Vietnam.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
At one point during the chaos and carnage of D-Day, the USS Frankford sailed so close to Omaha Beach that it scraped bottom. The destroyer's big guns blasted German machine-gun positions and helped pinned-down GIs advance on June 6, 1944, when all seemed lost. Tom Potts, then a teenager from Moorestown, was manning an antiaircraft gun on the Frankford's deck amid the cacophony of fire - and lost most of his hearing that day 70 years ago. After numerous surgeries and hearing aids, the now-89-year-old from Upper Pittsgrove, Salem County, still has trouble following conversations and is among four million disabled service members who returned home with the lingering effects of war. Next Sunday, all of them will be honored with the dedication of the American Veterans Disabled for Life Memorial in Washington.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the signal bridge of the USS Frank E. Evans, Steve Kraus was scanning the ocean about 3 a.m. as the destroyer made a long, sweeping starboard turn through the darkness. The watch was uneventful until - seemingly out of nowhere - the Australian aircraft carrier Melbourne came barreling toward the Evans at 22 knots. Kraus hurried into the ship's signal shack and got on the intercom to warn the pilot house below: "We're going to get hit!" Then came a mighty crash, and the screeching and shrieking of metal.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Stacey Burling and Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writers
The 61-year-old Philadelphia VA - the region's largest - offers a wide range of care, from sleep medicine to rehabilitation, neurology, and geriatrics. Its 57,500 enrolled veterans made more than 463,000 visits last year. The pharmacy fills more than 1,000 prescriptions a day. The center has nearly 2,500 employees and 280 inpatient beds, a spokeswoman said. About 86,000 veterans visited outpatient clinics in Horsham and in Fort Dix, Camden, and Sewell, N.J., in 2012. Its annual budget of $474 million is similar to that of the Phoenix VA, epicenter of the national investigation over wait times and cover-ups.
NEWS
May 28, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
MARY ROBERTS was packing a box - a care package of sardines, cookies, canned beans and Kool-Aid - to send to her brother in Vietnam when the knock came at the door. "My mother opened the door and just started screaming," Roberts, now 79, recalled yesterday during a Memorial Day tribute at Philadelphia's Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Her brother, Cpl. Lorrence T. Friday, was 25 when he was killed in Vietnam on April 7, 1968. "He had enlisted in the Army," Stellzene Roberts, 59, said of Friday, her uncle.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
For John Campbell, it was a trip to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington that inspired him to spend nearly a decade chronicling the lives of the 43 soldiers and sailors from Gloucester County who died in the war. That day in the early 1990s, the Vietnam vet found himself staring at the Wall. "I saw all those names," Campbell said. He felt he owed it to each of those men to tell his story. Campbell was one of many veterans and others who spent Veterans Day at the National Constitution Center, honoring those who served with words of reflection.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Clark DeLeon
When I first stepped into "The 1968 Exhibit" at the National Constitution Center, I felt the same sense of dread I experienced the first time I visited the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington. "This is gonna hurt," I thought. And it did. In both cases, the feeling was triggered by a sound. In Washington it was the "chi-chi-chi" of the automatic sprinklers that reminded me of the helicopters we heard every night on the evening news coverage of the war in Vietnam. This exhibit greets you with a recording of the low-throated chop of a Bell UH-1 Iroquois helicopter.
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
A replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, an acclaimed work of architecture and a solemn reminder of the human toll of the Vietnam War, will make its way Tuesday to Mount Laurel, where it will remain through the weekend. Nearly 250 feet long and bearing the names of the more than 58,000 servicemen and women who died in the war, the "Wall That Heals" is due to cross the Delaware Memorial Bridge about 8 a.m., travel north on I-295, and arrive with a motorcycle escort in Moorestown two hours later.
NEWS
October 21, 2012 | By Kevin Ferris, Inquirer Columnist
Let me introduce you to a few people, courtesy of the Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial and the Daily News. Rowland J. Adamoli, of Germantown, played football and soccer. He was an apprentice bricklayer who loved country music. He joined the Marines in 1961, and earned his high school diploma while serving. As things were heating up in Vietnam, he extended his enlistment so he'd be eligible for a tour there. "He was kind of a daring boy," his sister would say later. Cpl. Adamoli, an amphibious tractor crew chief, was killed on Aug. 18, 1965, one of the first Marines from Philadelphia to die in Vietnam.
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