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Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund

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NEWS
October 24, 1987 | By Clark DeLeon and Maida Odom, Inquirer Staff Writers
They came to the site of Philadelphia's Vietnam War memorial last night to apologize. There were eight of them, members of the board of the Liberty Bell Chapter 226 of the Vietnam Veterans of America, and they said they were sorry for what happened Thursday at City Hall. Some of them had shouted "thief" and demanded the removal of the head of the memorial fund-raising effort during City Council ceremonies honoring the leaders of the campaign. "I would like to publicly apologize to the Gold Star Parents, the Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund, the Vietnam veterans community and the membership of Chapter 266 for the unfortunate outburst," said chapter president Wilson Sproehnle in a statement read across the street from the memorial site at Front and Spruce Streets.
NEWS
April 25, 1986 | By FRANK DOUGHERTY, Daily News Staff Writer
Local Vietnam War veterans are on the march once again, but this time it's to the beat of a different drummer. They're campaigning in Northeast Philadelphia, raising funds for a memorial to honor the 615 city servicemen who lost their lives in Southeast Asia. "We've targeted the 65th Ward for this current fund-raiser, distributing door to door more than 6,000 envelopes, which we plan to collect tomorrow," explained John Harkanson, a member of the Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund board.
NEWS
October 25, 1987 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Services are to be held tonight at the Constitutional Pavilion at Independence Mall to honor Philadelphia's Vietnam War dead and will be followed by a candlelight procession to the Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial at Front and Spruce Streets. The memorial - just a dream in the minds of a few Vietnam veterans five years ago - is to be dedicated tomorrow after thousands of veterans march to honor the 630 servicemen killed in Vietnam who were inducted into the military in Philadelphia or were raised here.
NEWS
March 12, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Sponsors of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial have begun a search for relatives of 95 U.S. servicemen killed in the Southeast Asia conflict whose names will be inscribed on the black marble walls of the memorial and dedicated in May. The project, known as the Vietnam Memorial Family Search, had located survivors of 12 of the servicemen by mid-day yesterday, its first full day of operation, according to Tiffany Rounick, a spokeswoman for the project....
NEWS
October 26, 1987 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thousands of Vietnam veterans, joined by bands and drill teams, are to march today through Center City to the site of the new Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial, which will be dedicated as part of observances honoring the city's war dead. The parade will begin at 10 a.m. at the Museum of Art and will honor 630 servicemen killed or missing in the Vietnam War who were inducted into the service in Philadelphia or who were raised here. The marchers will move down the Benjamin Franklin Parkway to 19th Street, south on 19th to Chestnut Street, east on Chestnut to Front Street and south on Front to the memorial site at Front and Spruce Streets.
NEWS
June 28, 1987 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Members of the Last Patrol gathered yesterday on a patch of green that the locals call Six-Pack Park to begin construction of a memorial to the Philadelphia men killed in the Vietnam War. Having marched earlier this year from Washington to Philadelphia, they had brought home the names of the city's 628 war dead in a metal ammunition canister. Now, it was time for the formal groundbreaking ceremony at the Penn's Landing site. Yet, somehow, a gold-plated shovel seemed out of place.
NEWS
October 27, 1987 | By FRANK DOUGHERTY and JOANNE SILLS, Daily News Staff Writers
The note, taped in haste to one of the granite slabs, was signed with a peace symbol. To my friend Jim: Over the years I've cryed alot (sic) and couldn't understand why - but being buddies like we were - I find it only fitting to honor you and the others today - I cry today with tears of joy - May others join in and remember "the all" Now and Forever - Your Buddy Rick. P.S. love & friendship. As soon as dedication ceremonies ended at the Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial yesterday, the living began to make their offerings to the dead.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | By Edward Ohlbaum, Special to The Inquirer
There is no urgent need for a memorial to honor service personnel who died in the Gulf War, according to the Army veteran who campaigned in the 1980s to build the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington. Returning combat troops are getting "the type of welcome home that is appropriate" and there is "no shortage of ideas on how to recognize these people," said Jan C. Scruggs, 41. As president of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund, he helped raised $10 million amid a sea of controversy to build what has become the country's most visited memorial.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dennis P. Fink, the Vietnam veteran who led the fund-raising drive for a memorial at Penn's Landing to honor Philadelphians who died in that unpopular war, has been named an assistant managing director for the city. Fink, 39, is a resident of the Tacony section. He will remain as president of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund but he has resigned as deputy director of the Vietnam Veterans Multi-Service Center at 1302 Sansom St. "My other great love, besides the veterans' community, is the city of Philadelphia," Fink said in an interview Thursday, the day Managing Director James S. White, also a Vietnam veteran, announced the appointment.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1989 | By Barton Reppert, Associated Press Daily News movie critic Gary Thompson contributed to this report
The movie "Casualties of War" maligns Vietnam veterans by exploiting "false stereotypes" about the Vietnam War, the former chairman of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund said yesterday. John Wheeler, president of the Center for the Vietnam Generation, asserted that "every dollar spent to see this film is a knife in the heart of some vet, his kids or others who love him. " Such criticism places "Casualties of War" apart from other recent depictions of the war, such as "Hamburger Hill" and "Platoon," which generally drew praise from vets for their realistic depiction of combat life in Vietnam.
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NEWS
June 8, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
For some visitors, the black wall of names slanting across a Mount Laurel field Thursday was too painful to approach. Still others stepped so close to the traveling Vietnam Veterans Memorial model that it seemed they would enter into it if they could, touching one or two among its 58,000 names of the Vietnam War's combat dead and gazing for many moments. "Even though it's so long ago, I still remember the two soldiers coming to say he's dead," said Jean M. Murray of Mount Laurel.
NEWS
November 11, 1992 | By RICHARD COHEN
On the Sunday before Veterans Day, on a night when the names of the Vietnam War dead were being read aloud around the clock at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, two National Park rangers set off on a twice-daily task. One held a clipboard. The other knelt to recover items left at the base of the memorial. The kneeling agent looked up. "Diary," he said softly. He read the cover - "Tet Offensive, 1968" - and handed the little book up to his colleague. The two of them continued along the wall - a Zippo lighter, a page from a high school yearbook, a photo.
NEWS
August 9, 1992 | By Deborah Barfield, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Twenty-five years ago, Army Sgt. Larry Presher was dodging bullets as he led convoys in Vietnam. These days, he's hustling apples on a Washington street corner and living in a homeless shelter. "For some reason we're falling through the cracks," said the 47-year-old veteran from Gainesville, Fla. "I don't know why there are so many veterans in the streets. There are a lot of guys out there like me. " On any given night, about 600,000 people are homeless in America, and a recent study by the federal Task Force on Homelessness shows that roughly a third of them are veterans.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | By Edward Ohlbaum, Special to The Inquirer
There is no urgent need for a memorial to honor service personnel who died in the Gulf War, according to the Army veteran who campaigned in the 1980s to build the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington. Returning combat troops are getting "the type of welcome home that is appropriate" and there is "no shortage of ideas on how to recognize these people," said Jan C. Scruggs, 41. As president of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund, he helped raised $10 million amid a sea of controversy to build what has become the country's most visited memorial.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1989 | By Barton Reppert, Associated Press Daily News movie critic Gary Thompson contributed to this report
The movie "Casualties of War" maligns Vietnam veterans by exploiting "false stereotypes" about the Vietnam War, the former chairman of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund said yesterday. John Wheeler, president of the Center for the Vietnam Generation, asserted that "every dollar spent to see this film is a knife in the heart of some vet, his kids or others who love him. " Such criticism places "Casualties of War" apart from other recent depictions of the war, such as "Hamburger Hill" and "Platoon," which generally drew praise from vets for their realistic depiction of combat life in Vietnam.
NEWS
May 4, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The Vietnam Veterans Memorial has been defaced with several scratches including one resembling a swastika, according to National Park Service officials. This is the first time the memorial has been damaged since it opened in 1982, they said. The 493-foot-long black granite wall, inscribed with the names of more than 58,000 service personnel who were killed in the Southeast Asian conflict, has become the most visited monument in the capital. "The wall itself has such great respect that we have never had problems with damage," said Bill Ruback, superintendent of national parks in downtown Washington, in disclosing the damage Monday.
NEWS
October 27, 1987 | By FRANK DOUGHERTY and ANN GERHART, Daily News Staff Writers
After yesterday's dedication at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, a man of about 40 who was dressed in battle fatigues and carrying a bottle of beer approached the section bearing the names of war dead beginning with the letter "T". He took a big swig from the bottle, wet the fingers of his right hand with the beer, and traced them over one of the names. Then he wept. About a minute later, as he began walking away, he noticed some people staring at him, and said: "This guy I knew was a good friend.
NEWS
October 27, 1987 | By FRANK DOUGHERTY and JOANNE SILLS, Daily News Staff Writers
The note, taped in haste to one of the granite slabs, was signed with a peace symbol. To my friend Jim: Over the years I've cryed alot (sic) and couldn't understand why - but being buddies like we were - I find it only fitting to honor you and the others today - I cry today with tears of joy - May others join in and remember "the all" Now and Forever - Your Buddy Rick. P.S. love & friendship. As soon as dedication ceremonies ended at the Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial yesterday, the living began to make their offerings to the dead.
NEWS
October 26, 1987 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thousands of Vietnam veterans, joined by bands and drill teams, are to march today through Center City to the site of the new Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial, which will be dedicated as part of observances honoring the city's war dead. The parade will begin at 10 a.m. at the Museum of Art and will honor 630 servicemen killed or missing in the Vietnam War who were inducted into the service in Philadelphia or who were raised here. The marchers will move down the Benjamin Franklin Parkway to 19th Street, south on 19th to Chestnut Street, east on Chestnut to Front Street and south on Front to the memorial site at Front and Spruce Streets.
NEWS
October 26, 1987 | By Roy H. Campbell and Maida Odom, Inquirer Staff Writers
With word and song, with tears and prayers, the forgotten were remembered, the dead memorialized. Last night, under a starless sky, the 630 Philadelphia servicemen who died or were missing in action in the Vietnam War were paid tribute in a ceremony at the Constitution Pavilion near Independence Hall. There, well over 1,000 people gathered for a 6 p.m. memorial service, followed by a candlelight procession to the new Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial near Penn's Landing.
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