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Vietnam War

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NEWS
March 26, 2000
Next month marks the 25th anniversary of the end of the Vietnam War. Whether you were alive during that time or have learned about it since, we'd like to hear your answer to the following: What did that era - the war, the protests, the changes both brought about - teach you about America, its people and its values? Send essays of about 300 words to Community Voices/Vietnam, The Inquirer, Box 41705, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101. Send faxes to 215-854-4483 and e-mail to inquirer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1991 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic The Hollywood Reporter contributed to this column
In the years since the end of the Vietnam War, movies on the conflict have divided neatly between the peacetime experiences of returning veterans and more traditional depictions of soldiers in combat. Cinematically, the difference between Vietnam and our previous wars was that the order was reversed. Because of the lingering, bitter controversy over Vietnam, the films about veterans preceded the movies dealing with the war itself. A new film to be added to the growing and generally distinguished ranks of Vietnam movies will fuse these elements in a fresh way. In movies such as The Deer Hunter, we have seen combinations of war and peace, but Missing in America takes a new tack.
NEWS
April 24, 1991 | BY PHAM THANH
We have been told repeatedly in recent weeks that the ghosts of Vietnam have been laid to rest in the Persian Gulf. But I still hear them in the night, and I bet I'm not alone. In 1968, when I was 12 years old, I was injured and then saved by American soldiers during a battle in my village south of Da Nang. My father was beaten to death by South Vietnamese soldiers as he demonstrated outside an American base against the bombing and shelling of our village. A few months later my mother and grandmother were killed when a GI threw a grenade into our bomb shelter; the grenade severed my esophagus.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1989 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
After many years of pointed neglect, the Vietnam War has become a fit subject for the entertainment merchants. Although most movies and TV shows have maintained a high-minded gloss, one wonders how long it will be until that period is so distant, or cliched, that it can admit its own Hogan's Heroes or McHale's Navy. If that day ever comes, every viewer in the country should first be given a chance to see an unassuming but powerful little video called Kindred Men of a Dark War (28 minutes, $24.95)
NEWS
April 1, 1988 | By TOM SHALES, Special to the Daily News
Some people may feel they don't want to see even one more film about the Vietnam War. They should make an exception for "Dear America: Letters Home from Vietnam," an exceptional Home Box Office film that premieres on HBO at 9 p.m. Sunday. The movie consists of real letters that were written to loved ones and friends by men and women stationed in Vietnam during America's long, ruinous war. Actors and actresses - including Robert De Niro, Robin Williams, Elizabeth McGovern and Sean Penn - read the letters on the soundtrack over footage of life in the field, some of it taken by the GIs themselves.
NEWS
August 22, 1988 | BY MIKE ROYKO
If it's not too late, the Republicans ought to add another plank to their party platform. It should read something like this: "We believe in a strong military and are dedicated to stopping the spread of communism. We believe that if the circumstances become sufficiently grave, we should commit troops to this purpose, as we did in Grenada. "However, there should be certain exceptions. "We do not believe the son of a rich and prominent Republican should be required to take part in such dangerous military activities if he doesn't want to. " That would be appropriate, based on what I'm hearing Republicans saying about J. Danforth Quayle.
NEWS
October 19, 1986 | By Bobbie Dubroff, Special to The Inquirer
Although American involvement in Vietnam ended in March 1973, a symposium Tuesday night at Delaware County Community College demonstrated that the issues of the war still burn strong for many veterans. About 80 people, many of whom served in Vietnam, attended the session, called "Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Vietnam But Were Afraid To Ask. " It was sponsored by Delaware County's Chapter 67 of the Vietnam Veterans of America. In an intense four-hour session, a six-member panel gave personal recollections of the Southeast Asian conflict and then fielded questions on such topics as veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress syndrome and Agent Orange.
NEWS
June 26, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"Full Metal Jacket," a drama starring Matthew Modine, Vincent D'Onofrio, Lee Ermey and Arliss Howard. Directed by Stanley Kubrick. Screenplay by Stanley Kubrick, Michael Herr and Gustav Hasford. Running time: 115 minutes. A Warner Brothers release. At area theaters. 'Full Metal Jacket," Stanley Kubrick's new Vietnam picture, steps into the box with two strikes against it precisely because it is Stanley Kubrick's new Vietnam picture. Through no fault of his own, Kubrick was beat to the Vietnam punch by "Platoon.
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Louise Esola
One crisp fall morning in 1987, at the dedication of the Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Thomas Corcoran was nearly as heartbroken as he was in June 1969, when two uniformed men knocked on his door in Torresdale. They told him that his son Patrick M. Corcoran, 19, had been killed, and lost at sea. The harsh finality of it all, as 646 Philadelphia families know well, never went away for this grieving father. Crowding the sidewalks near Penn's Landing in 1987, many of those families stood at the newly dedicated memorial to see the names of their boys, their brothers, their fathers etched in stone.
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NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Zoë Miller, Staff Writer
The stolen memorial flag of Seaman Patrick Corcoran, a 19-year-old from Philadelphia who died aboard the USS Frank E. Evans during the Vietnam War, was returned Monday to the scene of the July Fourth crime - the front porch of a North Wildwood home. On Monday, an unidentified young woman returned the flag, which was taken from a flagpole of a home owned by Tom and Lorraine Schaffer on East 11th Avenue. The woman then got back inside a car that was waiting outside the Schaffers' home and left.
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Zoë Miller, Staff Writer
The American flag presented to the family of Seaman Patrick M. Corcoran at his funeral nearly 50 years ago is still missing. And the family wants it back, no questions asked. The priceless object was stolen on July 4th from a flagpole outside a home next door to the Corcoran family's Shore house in North Wildwood. Patrick Corcoran, a Torresdale native who served in the Vietnam War, died at sea at age 19 with 73 other sailors when the Navy destroyer USS Frank E. Evans collided in 1969 with Australia's HMAS Melbourne, an aircraft carrier.
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
For nearly a decade, the family of Seaman Patrick M. Corcoran has flown an American flag outside its Jersey Shore home on special occasions to honor the Philadelphia native lost at sea during the Vietnam War. It was the flag presented to the family nearly 50 years ago at his funeral. But early on the morning of July 4, someone snatched the huge flag from a flagpole on East 11th Avenue in North Wildwood only hours after it had been hoisted for the holiday. Now there is outrage among not only the Corcoran family and Shore officials but also in the emotions shared in a social-media campaign started by neighbors and the town to immediately return the cherished heirloom - one of the family's only physical connections to Corcoran, who died aboard the USS Frank E. Evans in 1969.
NEWS
June 7, 2016 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
'DO I CONTRADICT myself? "Very well then I contradict myself; "(I am large, I contain multitudes.)" Muhammad Ali did not write or say those words. But he might as well have. Amid the endless flow of obituaries, testimonials and personal accounts that have followed news of his death Friday, this indisputable truth emerged. He was large. He contained multitudes. He was, in so many ways, the personification of Walt Whitman's "Song of Myself. " He was a saint. He was a sinner.
SPORTS
June 6, 2016 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
What separated Muhammad Ali from other champions in the brutal profession that eventually claimed his life was more than the style by which his greatness was defined. He wasn't a plodding thug like Sonny Liston, whose title he lifted; or a plow horse like Joe Frazier, always moving forward one deliberate step at a time; or really like any of the other men he met in his 61 professional fights during a 21-year span. Ali danced, sure, and his grace and charisma have been documented for decades, but it was something else, his utter differentness , that set him apart as the country was struggling with its own alterations.
NEWS
May 29, 2016
Hystopia By David Means Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 352 pp. $26. Reviewed by Rayyan Al-Shawaf Hystopia , the much-anticipated debut novel by David Means (author of such esteemed short story collections as Assorted Fire Events and The Secret Goldfish ), brings the Vietnam War home - literally. And its provocative premise - that overcoming war-induced psychological trauma may prove impossible - has all the more resonance now, with the impact of the Iraq War. Unfortunately, however, the story itself veers between probing such trauma and satirizing it, all the while depicting ferocious violence perpetrated by a crazed veteran-turned-serial-killer.
NEWS
March 8, 2016 | By William Goodfellow
The populist presidential campaigns of Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump have been fueled by the deep disillusionment millions of Americans feel about what they believe is a rigged political and economic system. A stark rift has opened between those two candidates and the establishment wings of the two parties. A similar rift has opened over foreign policy, and the issue separating the populists from the establishment candidates is the Iraq war. In October 2002, Sen. Hillary Clinton voted for the resolution to authorize the use of force against Iraq.
NEWS
January 5, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Dennis Murphy spotted the young woman, standing on the first floor of Rosemont College's main building and looking around in awe. He thought he'd say hello. It was Phuong Nguyen's first day on campus. She told Murphy, the Catholic college's admissions officer, that she'd just arrived from Vietnam to pursue her master's. He'd been to Vietnam once, he told her. To fight. "My dad fought in the Vietnam War, too," she said. For the North. "It was a bit of a shock," recalled Murphy, who was shot five times and nearly died in that country.
NEWS
September 1, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
FRANK LEVISTER had a passion for helping people, especially those in dire straits. He worked with the homeless in Philadelphia, and his job with the state Department of Welfare was to make sure that nursing homes were doing their job helping others in need. James Franklin Levister Sr., a 21-year employee of the Pennsylvania Department of Welfare who later worked for two of the nursing homes he monitored, died Aug. 23 of multiple health complications at the age of 68. Frank was a Marine veteran of the Vietnam War. Although his family didn't know what happened to him there, it was obvious that he saw combat because among his decorations was the Purple Heart for wounds.
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