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SPORTS
July 17, 2013
LOUIS NAMM of Thorofare, N.J., is the Phillies' winner of Major League Baseball and People magazine's "Tribute for Heroes" campaign that honors veterans and military service members. Namm, along with representatives of the other 29 teams in baseball, will be recognized at the 2013 All-Star Game at Citi Field in New York tonight in a pregame ceremony. Namm was a sergeant in the Vietnam War when he stepped on a land mine and lost both legs. He sacrificed his body so that his men's lives would be spared, earning two Purple Hearts.
NEWS
June 28, 2013
Curtis Tarr, 88, the former head of the Selective Service System who oversaw the lottery for the draft during the Vietnam War, died of pneumonia Friday at his home in Walnut Creek, Calif., his daughter, Pam Tarr, said Wednesday. President Richard Nixon appointed Mr. Tarr as director of the Selective Service System in 1970. The nation had held its first lottery drawing for the draft in December 1969, and Mr. Tarr was responsible for implementing the changes, said Dick Flahavan, spokesman for the Selective Service.
NEWS
June 8, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
For some visitors, the black wall of names slanting across a Mount Laurel field Thursday was too painful to approach. Still others stepped so close to the traveling Vietnam Veterans Memorial model that it seemed they would enter into it if they could, touching one or two among its 58,000 names of the Vietnam War's combat dead and gazing for many moments. "Even though it's so long ago, I still remember the two soldiers coming to say he's dead," said Jean M. Murray of Mount Laurel.
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
A replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, an acclaimed work of architecture and a solemn reminder of the human toll of the Vietnam War, will make its way Tuesday to Mount Laurel, where it will remain through the weekend. Nearly 250 feet long and bearing the names of the more than 58,000 servicemen and women who died in the war, the "Wall That Heals" is due to cross the Delaware Memorial Bridge about 8 a.m., travel north on I-295, and arrive with a motorcycle escort in Moorestown two hours later.
NEWS
June 4, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
James Patrick Kelly was killed in war nearly 50 years ago. But on Sunday, Kelly, an Army second lieutenant from Hatboro, finally got recognition that will last for years to come. In a ceremony at the Wings of Freedom Aviation Museum in Horsham, a mile-long stretch of County Line Road in the township was officially dedicated as the James P. Kelly Memorial Highway. Scores of family and friends gathered at the ceremony to remember Kelly, killed Sept. 27, 1965, at age 23 in South Vietnam.
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By Charles Krauthammer
"This war, like all wars, must end. That's what history advises ... " - Barack Obama, May 23 Nice thought. But much as President Obama would like to close his eyes, click his heels three times, and declare the war on terror over, war is a two-way street. That's what history advises: Two sides to fight it, two to end it. By surrender (World War II), by armistice (Korea and Vietnam), or when the enemy simply disappears from the field (the Cold War). Obama says enough is enough.
NEWS
May 28, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kristofor Stonesifer had the sad distinction of becoming the first soldier Bucks County lost in the war on terrorism. Stonesifer, a 28-year-old Army Ranger who grew up near Doylestown, died just 38 days after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, when the Black Hawk helicopter he was in crashed near Kandahar, Afghanistan. When Stonesifer's parents got the news, the first to reach out to them were local Vietnam veterans, said his mother, Ruth Stonesifer. "It showed us that we have to get out and be part of the community and do as much as we can to help other veterans," she said last week.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Gillian Flaccus, Associated Press
YORBA LINDA, Calif. - U.S. Navy Lt. Cmdr. Doug Burns was on a night reconnaissance mission searching for enemy trucks when he was shot down by antiaircraft fire and taken prisoner during the Vietnam War. Burns broke three vertebrae when he ejected into a rice paddy and spent the first weeks of his captivity strapped to a concrete pallet and then months at a time in solitary confinement. His wife and three children didn't know for years whether he was alive or dead - and when he arrived home 61/2 years later, Burns learned his wife had left him for another man. "It was hard to take, but that's what it was," said Burns, who is now 78 and remarried.
NEWS
May 24, 2013
THERE ARE MANY kinds of desperation, as many as the stars above and the souls beneath them. The death of a child, the disintegration of a marriage, homes lost to floodwaters and whirlwinds, all of these things can drive you to - and beyond - the point of suicide. And yet, there are sources of strength as varied as the sorrow. For one man, that source was found in unwritten words, tapped out on prison walls and shared with his captured brothers in Vietnam. Major Gen. John Borling, a 6 1/2-year "guest" at the infamous Hanoi Hilton is, like Joyce Kilmer and Wilfred Own, a soldier-poet.
NEWS
May 14, 2013
By Brian Wright O'Connor Nearly 50 years after leaving the University of Pennsylvania for Vietnam, Lt. Col. Mortimer Lenane O'Connor will receive a posthumous Ph.D. today in a ceremony honoring academic achievement and sacrifice on the field of battle. My father, who set aside his dissertation to lead soldiers in war, will be included in the Class of 1968, the year he would most likely have completed his doctorate had fate not intervened. Born in 1930, my dad grew up in the company of soldier-storytellers on Army garrisons from Manila to the Old West, and watched his own father and three uncles set off for war in Europe.
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