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NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By Chris Brummitt, Associated Press
HANOI, Vietnam - Vietnam and the United States are close to an agreement allowing Americans to adopt Vietnamese children again, five years after a ban was imposed amid allegations of baby-selling and babies offered without parents' consent, a visiting U.S. senator said. Vietnam was a popular destination for prospective adoptive parents before Washington imposed the ban in 2008 following a U.S. investigation. Senators and adoption lobby groups have been urging Vietnam to pass stronger laws and better monitor the process so that adoptions can resume.
NEWS
February 6, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph Crescenz called it "humbling. " Pennsylvania's two U.S. senators, Pat Toomey and Bob Casey, introduced a bill Monday to have the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center renamed after Michael J. Crescenz, the city's only Medal of Honor recipient from the Vietnam War. Joseph Crescenz was 12 when his brother Michael, 19, was killed while single-handedly taking out enemy machine-gun bunkers on Nov. 20, 1968, in South Vietnam. U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah (D., Pa.) also introduced a bill Monday to change the facility's name to the Cpl. Michael J. Crescenz Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center.
NEWS
February 3, 2013
Pham Duy, 91, Vietnam's most prolific songwriter, who captured the strength of his people through years of turbulence, and composed dozens of tunes after settling in California, died Jan. 27, from heart ailments after two operations, in Ho Chi Minh City, said his daughter Thai Hanh. Known as the "musician of 1,000 songs," Mr. Pham was revered by generations of Vietnamese, who memorized his melodies and taught them to their children and grandchildren. He led a musical dynasty that included his wife, diva Thai Hang, and eight children, who performed around the world as part of the band the Dreamers.
NEWS
January 3, 2013 | Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - The Taliban on Wednesday likened the planned withdrawal of U.S. forces from Afghanistan to America's pullout from Vietnam, calling it a "declare victory and run" strategy. A statement from the extremist group said the ongoing transfer of security operations from U.S. troops to Afghan forces was merely a retreat similar to the American withdrawal from South Vietnam before the communist victory there in 1975. American-led NATO troops are scheduled to pull out of Afghanistan by the end of 2014, although the United States will leave a residual force behind and other NATO countries have pledged continuing support for the Kabul government.
NEWS
November 13, 2012 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
From the road, the dark chevron that snakes along the grounds of the Coatesville VA Hospital looks like a fence for a Little League diamond. Come closer, on a cold, blustery day, and you'll see men and women approach it slowly, silently - a sign announces: Quiet Zone. A bearded, ponytailed man walks up to the wall and searches its 250-foot length for a name etched into the powder-coated aluminum. He finds what he's looking for, touching the words, tracing their length, and then pulls back to take in their collective weight, 58,282 names in all. George and Deborah Cross drove out from Downingtown on Thursday morning.
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Louise Esola
One crisp fall morning in 1987, at the dedication of the Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Thomas Corcoran was nearly as heartbroken as he was in June 1969, when two uniformed men knocked on his door in Torresdale. They told him that his son Patrick M. Corcoran, 19, had been killed, and lost at sea. The harsh finality of it all, as 646 Philadelphia families know well, never went away for this grieving father. Crowding the sidewalks near Penn's Landing in 1987, many of those families stood at the newly dedicated memorial to see the names of their boys, their brothers, their fathers etched in stone.
SPORTS
November 8, 2012 | By Rusty Miller, Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio - As Jim Foster grows older, his thoughts often flood back to those he has known who have passed on. Maybe that's expected for a 64-year-old who spent three years in the Army, including 18 months in Vietnam, before a lifetime as a teacher and coach. "As you age, you start to think a little bit more relative to guys who you went to school with and served with that died in the service," he said softly. That his Ohio State team opens its season Friday on an aircraft carrier, surrounded by servicemen and women, enhances his memories.
NEWS
October 24, 2012 | BY ANDREW EISER, Daily News Staff Writer
THE 646 service members started their lives, careers and families in the "city of neighborhoods," but they were never able to return from the Vietnam War. Twelve years after the war ended in 1975, a group of 10 Vietnam veterans, known as the "Last Patrol," trekked from Washington, D.C., to the city, carrying the names of all the 646 Philadelphians who lost their lives in Vietnam. The Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial will celebrate the trek's 25th anniversary this weekend.
NEWS
October 23, 2012
Salute to Vietnam veterans Last year my wife bought me a baseball cap that reads "Vietnam Veteran," and I began to wear it, at first with apprehension. Two weeks ago, we were at a craft fair in Morgantown, and I was wearing my Vietnam Veteran cap. Three small children came up to me and asked to shake my hand, and they thanked me for my service in Vietnam. Two were girls, who kissed me and said thank you, and the boy shook my hand and also said thank you. I looked up and saw their mother standing there.
NEWS
October 21, 2012 | By Kevin Ferris, Inquirer Columnist
Let me introduce you to a few people, courtesy of the Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial and the Daily News. Rowland J. Adamoli, of Germantown, played football and soccer. He was an apprentice bricklayer who loved country music. He joined the Marines in 1961, and earned his high school diploma while serving. As things were heating up in Vietnam, he extended his enlistment so he'd be eligible for a tour there. "He was kind of a daring boy," his sister would say later. Cpl. Adamoli, an amphibious tractor crew chief, was killed on Aug. 18, 1965, one of the first Marines from Philadelphia to die in Vietnam.
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