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NEWS
March 11, 1990 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine living in a place with the sparkle of the city and the calm of the country. A place where you could walk to work, school or shopping, stroll the streets at night, live next to people who were different from you. There would be houses and supermarkets, offices and stores, recreation centers and parks, apartments and a town square all in one community. In fact, it might look a lot like a Parisian boulevard, with buildings five and six stories high, shops and offices on the first level and apartments above, or a postmodern version of Chestnut Hill.
NEWS
June 12, 1989 | By Mark Jaffe, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Chinese countryside is a peaceful land of wheat fields, poplars, honeysuckle and the acrid aroma of night soil. Only a murmur of Beijing's strife and bloodshed has reached the red brick villages about 25 miles from the capital. But those scraps of news have been enough to plunge the peasants into quiet despair, said a young American who teaches English in the village of Cui. "It has been a very bad week. People have been somber, quiet and very withdrawn," said James Burton, 27, who was found pedaling along a country road, where the homes are clustered together in villages set several miles apart.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2011 | By David R. Stampone, For The Inquirer
Indigenous folklore traditions have had a rough enough time surviving in the modern world. A man-made disaster requiring the permanent resettlement of an entire region's population doesn't help. Following the calamitous Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident of April 26, 1986, 160 Ukrainian villages in the contaminated zone were effectively wiped out. There was fear that the area's already fading, thousand-year-old polyphonic singing styles and ancient folk songs, some believed to be pre-Christian in origin, had suffered a cultural death-blow.
NEWS
April 21, 2012 | By Mark Stevenson, Associated Press
XALITZINTLA, Mexico - A 17,886-foot volcano outside Mexico City exhaled dozens of towering plumes of ash and shot fragments of glowing rock down its slopes Friday morning, frightening the residents of surrounding villages with hours of low-pitched roaring not heard in a decade. A roiling white cloud of ash, gas, water vapor and superheated rock spewed from the cone of Popocatepetl high above the village of Xalitzintla, whose residents said they were awakened by a window-rattling series of eruptions.
NEWS
August 4, 1996 | By William Ecenbarger, FOR THE INQUIRER
I see the sign and can't resist: "Vasa (via Old Road). " I brake the rental car, reverse, and turn right. In fields on both sides of the road, men are harvesting ruby-red grapes and loading them onto donkeys, which carry them to trucks that will take them down to the coast, to the big wine cooperatives around the port of Limassol. The road is sticky with juice oozing from the trucks, and I pass another intriguing sign: "Caution: Road Slippery With Grape Juice. " I stop to talk to a harvester who is sitting by the side of the road in the shade of an almond tree.
TRAVEL
February 9, 2015 | By William Ecenbarger, For The Inquirer
ST. LEON SUR VEZERE, France - It is a scene that might have been painted by Claude Monet - a gently flowing river with overhanging trees peering down at their own reflections, picnickers sitting primly on blankets in the grass, and on the far bank a bright-red poppy field. This village of about 200 inhabitants in an area east of Bordeaux known as the Dordogne is a postcard lost in the mail for a century - honey-colored stone houses joined by cobblestoned alleys - all of it overseen by a church with a square bell tower that has been offering Masses since 1150.
NEWS
December 15, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
Authorities have discovered that 20 more villages tucked away in the mountains of Armenia were seriously damaged by last week's earthquake, and 150 looters have been arrested, Soviet media said today. Meanwhile, the top U.S. disaster relief official said today that some foreign rescue teams have given up hope of finding more survivors in the rubble left by the Armenian earthquake and are heading home. However, Soviet officials said the rescue effort would continue and denied reports that stricken cities would be bulldozed to prevent an epidemic.
NEWS
August 13, 2012 | By Ali Akbar Dareini, Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - Residents of the zone in northwestern Iran hit by powerful twin earthquakes described moments of terror and panic, with birds crowing loudly in warning seconds before the ground shook. As the death toll rose Sunday to more than 250 with entire villages leveled, rescuers called off searches for survivors and turned their attention to caring for the 16,000 people left homeless. At least 20 villages were destroyed in the quakes Saturday that were followed by 36 aftershocks, state television reported.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | BY LINDA WRIGHT MOORE
The little boy in the supermarket was 7 or 8. Neatly dressed in a down- filled jacket and matching cap, he was gently pushing an empty shopping cart behind the young woman, shuffling ahead. Could she have been his mother? She wore frayed bedroom slippers over soiled white socks. Her eyelids were swollen. Her hair was uncombed and filled with lint. Her body was barely visible under a coat two sizes too big. She was in a daze. She seemed almost unaware the child was with her, yet his connection to her was tangible - and heartrending.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Builder Brian DiSabatino , fourth-generation boss of Wilmington's EDiS Co. , says he expects to start work this year on the first of seven "mixed-use villages," replacing 2,000 acres of corn and soybean fields, at what he and his partners call the Town of Whitehall, 12 minutes south of I-95 in Delaware. There have been other big plans for this ground. It was shopped as a nuclear power plant site, and for an Intel computer-chip factory. But "New Urbanist" communities, with curbside stores, offices, and charter schools, are what the ground's owner, the $125 million-asset Welfare Foundation , decided will pay best, pending final approvals from the county council.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
May 22, 2016 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
It is difficult to visit the home of Margaret Meigs and Paul Laskow without recognizing their passion for the Schuylkill and sharing their concern for the river's future. The couple's 2,000-square-foot condominium in Queen Village seems to be dedicated to promoting the Schuylkill even though Philadelphia's western waterway is about two miles west of their new home. Their thoughts are never far from the river. Not only do the couple get up at 5 a.m. each day to row on the Schuylkill, but their aqua living-room rug was custom-designed to show the patterns of the river with its bends and borders housing the boathouses.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2016 | Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
That proverbial village - you know, the one everyone says is essential to raise a child - might be the other sling-wearing, Bugaboo-pushing mommies on your block. Or it might be the whole world. Two new books by Philly-connected authors - albeit in very different ways - upend the notion that parenting is meant to be a solo gig. The Mommy Group: Freaking Out, Finding Friends, and Surviving the Happiest Time of Our Lives by Elizabeth Isadora Gold follows a group of women in a flush section of Brooklyn who weather miscarriages, births, sleep training, and the sea change that motherhood brings to one's sense of self.
NEWS
January 19, 2016 | DEUTSCHE PRESSE-AGENTUR
CAIRO - Islamic State fighters have abducted at least 400 civilians in eastern Syria after an attack by the Islamic militants in which at least 135 people were killed, a monitoring group said Sunday. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said Islamic State moved the seized people from the village of al-Baghaliyeh after the attack Saturday. The militants captured the village, said the watchdog, which relies on a network of activists in Syria. "We fear that the 400 will be executed or enslaved by the organization on the pretext that they are loyal to the regime," said Rami Abdel-Rahman, head of the observatory.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2016 | Staff
David Bowie Blackstar (ISO / Columbia ***1/2) Three Januarys ago, David Bowie celebrated his 66th birthday by ending a 10-year recording hiatus and surprise-announcing The Next Day, an altogether impressive collection that sounded like a shockingly normal, classic David Bowie album. Blackstar is something different. Released last week on Bowie's 69th birthday, it reintroduces the strange, experimental anti-pop David Bowie. Its opening title cut is a mysterious three-part suite, a quietly clattering, mournful lament that might be sci-fi noir fantasia or could be "about ISIS," as saxophonist Donny McCaslin - whose downtown New York quintet backs Bowie, along with longtime producer Tony Visconti - has said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since he captured the public imagination in 1999 with his remarkable breakout hit The Sixth Sense , M. Night Shyamalan has directed 10 features (an 11th, Split , is due in 2017). And each one, including The Happening , Devil , Lady in the Water , and personal favorite The Village , has received wildly mixed reviews. Yet Shyamalan, 45, who was born in India, retains a core fanbase in the Philadelphia region where he lives and where he consistently shoots his pictures.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Presbyterian Senior Living said it will spend $6 million on capital projects over the next three years at Cathedral Village, a continuing-care retirement community in Philadelphia's Andorra neighhorhood. Another $4.5 million will be spent on an electric co-generation system. Cathedral Village became a subsidiary of Presbyterian Senior Living, of Dillsburg, Pa., in June. Both are tax-exempt organizations.
NEWS
August 8, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
The stretch of Lancaster Avenue between 34th and 39th Streets transformed Thursday night, as thousands of city residents came out to taste hard apple cider and corn on the cob at a semiannual block party that made the street bustle. A crowd of people made their way down the block, some dressed in business attire, sipping a beer at the end of the workday. Others grabbed a meal in T-shirts, their dogs and children in tow. The party was called Night Market, a project run by the nonprofit Food Trust and in its fifth season.
FOOD
August 7, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Beer geek and reformed lawyer Kristen Cevoli and business partner Jon Shinners unlocked the door on BeerLOVE , their bottle shop/tasting room at 714 S. Fourth St. in Queen Village. The storefront, across from Essene market and down the block from Famous 4th Street Deli, is stocked with about 500 beers, plus a sizable list of large-format beers. They also have eight taps dispensing many one-offs. Customers can sample flights, get a full pour, or fill a growler. Food is basically packaged bar snacks, including popcorn, plaintain chips, jerky, pickles, s'mores.
NEWS
June 16, 2015 | BY DAVID FAIR
THE NUMBER of emergencies impacting Philadelphia's children is getting to be more than a little scary. We are all aware of the urgency of the crisis facing the public schools. Then there are the crises in everything from youth violence to childhood obesity. And despite the obesity issue, we're near the top of the list when it comes to children living in deep poverty or suffering from extreme hunger. Our "village," which is comprised of all government agencies and organizations that provide services for the most vulnerable among us, must do a better job of raising its children.
NEWS
May 21, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reenactors with the Sixth Regiment U.S. Colored Troops will honor the dead Saturday with a gun salute at the Civil War cemetery in Timbuctoo, a historic village in Westampton that was a stop on the Underground Railroad. Among other activities planned at Timbuctoo that day are talks by descendants of former slaves and free African Americans who lived in the Burlington County village in the mid-nineteenth century, and speeches by an archaeologist and historian who have researched the site.
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