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NEWS
October 26, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald H. Fey, 82, a Korean War veteran, former Philadelphia firefighter, and retired fund-raising writer, died Sunday, Oct. 18, of heart failure at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mr. Fey, of Drexel Hill, whose daughter is award-winning writer and actress Tina Fey, was a professional writer for more than 30 years, primarily in fund-raising and development. He helped raise more than $500 million for schools, hospitals, and public-service agencies. In 1992, he retired from Thomas Jefferson University, where he was director of development communications.
NEWS
October 10, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. John J. Farrell, 79, president of Biscayne College in Miami from 1975 to 1980 and a development office executive at Villanova University from 1980 to 1993, died Friday, Oct. 5, of heart failure at AristaCare at Meadow Springs in Plymouth Meeting. Born on Staten Island, N.Y., Father Farrell studied at the Augustinian Academy there from 1946 to 1950, then entered the Augustinian religious order and was ordained a priest in 1959. Father Farrell earned a bachelor's degree in philosophy at Villanova in 1955 and completed his theological studies in 1959 at Augustinian College in Washington.
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
George D. Murphy, 85, a retired English professor at Villanova University, died Monday, Dec. 22, of pulmonary complications at Roxborough Memorial Hospital. Known for his wit and stylish dress, Mr. Murphy began teaching at the Catholic university on the Main Line in 1954 and retired 46 years later, in 2000. But he kept his hand in teaching, offering literature classes to fellow retirees at Cathedral Village in Philadelphia, the retirement community where he lived. "He was very engaging," said daughter Karen Murphy Cain.
NEWS
February 21, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Villanova University has abruptly canceled a weeklong workshop by a gay performance artist whose stage shows are often laced with nudity and simulated sex but who has taught and lectured at numerous colleges, including the nation's largest Catholic university, DePaul, in Chicago. Tim Miller, whom the Los Angeles Times once called the "patron saint of the gay performance world" and who was one of four envelope-pushing artists whose funding the National Endowment for the Arts revoked in 1990, said he was told Sunday night by the professor who booked the workshop that Villanova's president, the Rev. Peter M. Donohue, had canceled the event without giving a reason.
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE REV. EDMUND Dobbin always said his first love was teaching. So it had to have been something of a relief when Dobbin left the presidency of Villanova University at the end of the 2005-06 academic year after 18 years. Sure, he said, he loved it, but being an administrator is a far cry from the hands-on experience of the classroom, the shaping of young minds, the interaction with students hanging on your every word - at least in theory. "Teaching was always my first love," he said on leaving the presidency and stepping into a classroom at the Main Line university he served for so long.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
The setting: the Weymouth building of Lancaster Court Apartments. The event: move-in day at St. Joseph's University. The mood: tired and sweaty from carrying so much stuff up so many steps as temperatures climbed, too, into the 90s. The exception to this overall miserable scene late last month: Isabela Garcia. A 19-year-old sophomore from Panama, Garcia was the picture of Zen, chilling in her air-conditioned room while two guys lugged in seven boxes, two duffel bags, and two large trash bags full of her belongings, as well as a plastic cabinet, a hamper, a comforter, and a mini-fridge.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Mark C. Alexander, named Friday as the new dean of Villanova University's Charles Widger School of Law, has had a long and varied career as a law school administrator and scholar, a litigator, and even a political adviser and candidate. He served at one time as senior adviser for President Obama's 2008 presidential election campaign, and once ran for office - unsuccessfully, in the Democratic primary for the New Jersey Senate in 2013. He has been widely published, and is known as an expert on the First Amendment.
NEWS
April 2, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe, Staff Writer
A longtime Villanova University professor has been charged with hundreds of counts of possessing child pornography, Radnor Township police said Thursday. Christopher Haas, 60, a tenured associate professor of history and classical studies, was arrested after university officials discovered he accessed pornographic images on a public university computer last month, officials said. The charges on 415 counts came four years after investigators from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Philadelphia office began an investigation into Haas during which authorities allege they found more than 400 pornographic images on the Villanova-issued laptop at his home in September 2012.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Villanova investment manager Barry R. Bekkedam pleaded not guilty Tuesday to charges that he helped orchestrate fraudulent loans from Nova Bank in a bid to secure government bailout money for the now-defunct Berwyn institution. Bekkedam, who moved from the Main Line to Hobe Sound, Fla., in 2010, declined to comment after a 15-minute hearing in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. The investment manager, who specialized in deals for wealthy clients who needed lots of income to support high-end lifestyles, was released on his own recognizance after signing a $250,000 bond.
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Joseph G. McCormick, 60, of Newtown Square, a managing director at the asset management firm PFM Group, and a former lobbyist for public and corporate entities, died Sunday, July 17, of complications from cancer at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. McCormick had been hospitalized for six days prior to his death, which "came as a shock to his many friends and associates," business partner John White said in an email. For the last 12 years, Mr. McCormick was an executive with the PFM Group, a national financial adviser and asset manager.
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NEWS
September 15, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Joan Mazzotti always has a story about a student who has faced tough circumstances but has persevered to get to and through college - with her organization's help. In Mazzotti's more than 16 years at the helm of Philadelphia Futures, the nonprofit organization has shepherded more than 500 students through cash-strapped public high schools in the city and on to college. Among them were two Haitian-born orphans whom she and her husband mentored. Now, Mazzotti herself is preparing to take a culminating step.
NEWS
September 14, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Pauline Poole Foster, 94, the retired director of counseling for the Lower Merion School District, died Aug. 28, of heart failure at Beaumont at Bryn Mawr, where she had lived for 17 years. Dr. Foster grew up in West Long Branch, Monmouth County, the youngest of eight children of Albert and Bessie Covert Brown Poole. She graduated from high school at age 15 and majored in mathematics at Monmouth College (now Monmouth University), also in West Long Branch. After graduating from college, Dr. Foster became a math teacher at Manasquan High School, where she was only two years older than her most senior students.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
The setting: the Weymouth building of Lancaster Court Apartments. The event: move-in day at St. Joseph's University. The mood: tired and sweaty from carrying so much stuff up so many steps as temperatures climbed, too, into the 90s. The exception to this overall miserable scene late last month: Isabela Garcia. A 19-year-old sophomore from Panama, Garcia was the picture of Zen, chilling in her air-conditioned room while two guys lugged in seven boxes, two duffel bags, and two large trash bags full of her belongings, as well as a plastic cabinet, a hamper, a comforter, and a mini-fridge.
NEWS
August 29, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
A pair of Villanova University astronomers had spent years studying the radiation emitted by red dwarfs - a type of star that includes the sun's nearest neighbor, Proxima Centauri. Then, two months ago, they were let in on a big secret. After studying a pattern of "wobbles" in the light from Proxima Centauri, an international team of scientists concluded the phenomenon was caused by a previously unknown planet. Could the Villanova scientists help determine if water might exist on its surface?
BUSINESS
August 23, 2016
Hirtle Callaghan, a Philadelphia provider of outsourced chief investment officers, has named Ranji Nagaswami CEO. From 2010 to 2012, Nagaswami served as chief investment adviser to the administration of Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg for New York City's $150 billion Employee Retirement Systems. Most recently, she had been operating partner and senior adviser at Corsair Capital. Jonathan J. Hirtle, who cofounded Hirtle Callaghan in 1988, will remain as the firm's executive chairman.
NEWS
August 20, 2016 | By Olivia Exstrum, Staff Writer
At 44, Matthew Slaughter has seen a lot, and not much of it in an academic setting. He grew up in North Philadelphia's Richard Allen Homes and became a father when he was 14. Arrested before his 20th birthday for a 1990 murder in North Philadelphia, he was sentenced in 1992 to life in prison. Similarly, Edward Ramirez, 39, who grew up in Logan and whose father is a retired Philadelphia police officer, was just 18 when he committed a 1995 murder in Frankford for which he is serving a life term.
NEWS
August 10, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Mary Seton Corboy, 58, of Philadelphia, an urban pioneer whose farm on a former factory site in Kensington brought fresh produce and other locally grown foods to the inner city, died Aug. 7 of complications from cancer at Jefferson University Hospital. Ms. Corboy was a chef with a master's degree in political science from Villanova University, and her love of cooking drove her early career as she worked in restaurants. All the while, though, she sought to build "something different that could marry her passion for good, healthy food and her love of physical labor," her friends said in a tribute.
NEWS
August 9, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Michael J. Ferguson, 64, of Ardmore, a broadcast producer, adjunct professor, and mentor to many, died Aug. 3, of stomach cancer at his family's home in Narberth. He was the second oldest of eight children born in Chicago to Thomas and Frances Ferguson. "Michael was the perfect big brother to everyone in our family," his brother Steve said. Mr. Ferguson graduated from St. Joseph's Preparatory School in 1969 and Villanova University in 1973, majoring in education and the classics.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2016 | By Alexandra Villarreal, Staff Writer
Tonight marks the opening ceremony of the 2016 Olympics, hosted by Rio de Janeiro. For those of us who didn't quite qualify to swim alongside Michael Phelps but still want to stay active, here are a few local ways to try out Olympic sports while tuning into the Games. B&A Archery, 7169 State Rd., Beginner's lessons: $35, 215-333-3520. "Archery is addictive," said Bill Arrow, owner of Tacony's B&A Archery. "When you shoot a bow, you want to do it more, you want to get better, and you want to do what other people can't.
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
THEODORE J. BERRY, 98, a Main Line physician, author, and educator, died Thursday, July 14, of pneumonia at his home in Naples, Fla. Dr. Berry lived in Villanova and then Bryn Mawr before moving to Naples in 1999. He was a prominent figure at Bryn Mawr Hospital for 45 years, practicing internal medicine and serving for a time as chief of staff. He retired in 1993 as director of medical education. Although Dr. Berry was hard-driving and productive, he also was very genial. Quietly and discreetly, he was physician and friend to the Main Line's elite families.
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