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NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
George D. Murphy, 85, a retired English professor at Villanova University, died Monday, Dec. 22, of pulmonary complications at Roxborough Memorial Hospital. Known for his wit and stylish dress, Mr. Murphy began teaching at the Catholic university on the Main Line in 1954 and retired 46 years later, in 2000. But he kept his hand in teaching, offering literature classes to fellow retirees at Cathedral Village in Philadelphia, the retirement community where he lived. "He was very engaging," said daughter Karen Murphy Cain.
NEWS
October 10, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. John J. Farrell, 79, president of Biscayne College in Miami from 1975 to 1980 and a development office executive at Villanova University from 1980 to 1993, died Friday, Oct. 5, of heart failure at AristaCare at Meadow Springs in Plymouth Meeting. Born on Staten Island, N.Y., Father Farrell studied at the Augustinian Academy there from 1946 to 1950, then entered the Augustinian religious order and was ordained a priest in 1959. Father Farrell earned a bachelor's degree in philosophy at Villanova in 1955 and completed his theological studies in 1959 at Augustinian College in Washington.
NEWS
February 21, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Villanova University has abruptly canceled a weeklong workshop by a gay performance artist whose stage shows are often laced with nudity and simulated sex but who has taught and lectured at numerous colleges, including the nation's largest Catholic university, DePaul, in Chicago. Tim Miller, whom the Los Angeles Times once called the "patron saint of the gay performance world" and who was one of four envelope-pushing artists whose funding the National Endowment for the Arts revoked in 1990, said he was told Sunday night by the professor who booked the workshop that Villanova's president, the Rev. Peter M. Donohue, had canceled the event without giving a reason.
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE REV. EDMUND Dobbin always said his first love was teaching. So it had to have been something of a relief when Dobbin left the presidency of Villanova University at the end of the 2005-06 academic year after 18 years. Sure, he said, he loved it, but being an administrator is a far cry from the hands-on experience of the classroom, the shaping of young minds, the interaction with students hanging on your every word - at least in theory. "Teaching was always my first love," he said on leaving the presidency and stepping into a classroom at the Main Line university he served for so long.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Villanova University will rename its School of Law for a 1973 alumnus who went on to a career in investment management, marking the first time that one of the university's schools will carry the name of a donor. Charles "Chuck" Widger, founder and executive chairman of Brinker Capital, a Berwyn investment management firm, gave the school $25 million, the second-largest donation in Villanova's history, the university announced Wednesday. The money is largely to be used for scholarships for students who show leadership skills and an interest in both business and law - worlds that Widger has bridged.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Villanova investment manager Barry R. Bekkedam pleaded not guilty Tuesday to charges that he helped orchestrate fraudulent loans from Nova Bank in a bid to secure government bailout money for the now-defunct Berwyn institution. Bekkedam, who moved from the Main Line to Hobe Sound, Fla., in 2010, declined to comment after a 15-minute hearing in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. The investment manager, who specialized in deals for wealthy clients who needed lots of income to support high-end lifestyles, was released on his own recognizance after signing a $250,000 bond.
NEWS
September 9, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. William Atkinson would probably laugh at the idea that he could become a saint of the Roman Catholic Church. The Upper Darby-born priest, who died in 2006 when he was 60, didn't think his life was anything extraordinary. But the team of caregivers who washed, dressed, and fed Atkinson after he became a quadriplegic while in seminary think differently. For them, the man who loved a roast beef sandwich and a beer conducted ministry while displaying a kind of inspiring - and otherworldly - acceptance of his situation that friends and family say they couldn't have mustered.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edmond Dougherty had high-flying hopes for the aerial-camera system he helped develop to capture action at school sports events. But those ambitions have landed with a thud. Chalk it up as another recession casualty. Wavecam, brought to life at a workshop in Villanova, took flight in 2008, just as the economy was free-falling and budgets constricted. "When people were canceling Christmas parties because it wouldn't look right, we were going around saying, 'Hey! Want to buy a flying camera?
NEWS
October 26, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald H. Fey, 82, a Korean War veteran, former Philadelphia firefighter, and retired fund-raising writer, died Sunday, Oct. 18, of heart failure at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mr. Fey, of Drexel Hill, whose daughter is award-winning writer and actress Tina Fey, was a professional writer for more than 30 years, primarily in fund-raising and development. He helped raise more than $500 million for schools, hospitals, and public-service agencies. In 1992, he retired from Thomas Jefferson University, where he was director of development communications.
NEWS
January 11, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Brian McDonnell lies in his small, dark room under the crucifix on his wall, praying Hail Marys on his blue plastic rosary beads. Symbols of a church that had forsaken him, but one that he has never abandoned. He worries that he is dying. It is all he thinks about. "I don't know how long I'm going to last," he said the other afternoon. "I just feel like I'm fading quick. I just fall asleep saying Hail Marys. " Brian suffers from schizophrenia, dementia, and depression. The manifestations of his mental illness are inextricably intertwined with the sexual abuse he suffered at the hands of a priest as an altar boy at now-closed St. Gregory's in West Philadelphia.
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NEWS
February 4, 2016 | By Patricia Madej, Staff Writer
Joseph A. Coffey Jr., 73, who balanced life as a lawyer, family man, and avid traveler, died of cancer Friday, Jan. 22, at his home in Tequesta, Fla., where he had lived since 2000. Mr. Coffey grew up in Southwest Philadelphia. He attended Most Blessed Sacrament School in Kingsessing and West Philadelphia Catholic High School for Boys as well as La Salle University, where he studied marketing, graduating in 1964. After graduating, he served in Army for a year before eventually enrolling in Temple University's law school, from which he graduated in 1969.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
John Y. Gotanda, dean of the Villanova Law School, will leave that job in June to take over as president of Hawaii Pacific University in Honolulu. Gotanda, who taught for more than a decade at the law school and held various administrative posts before being named dean in 2011, took over during a time of upheaval and trauma. No sooner had he been named dean than the law school disclosed that admissions data for incoming students had been falsified for an undetermined number of years, an apparent attempt to raise the school's position in the U.S. News & World Report rankings.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Anne Welsh McNulty, a New York investment manager and native of Springfield, Delaware County, made gifts of $10 million to the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School and $5 million to Villanova University, the two schools said Wednesday. The gift to Wharton will be used to expand the school's leadership program, which will be name the Anne and John McNulty Leadership Program at the Wharton School. John McNulty, Anne's late husband, died in 2005. The second gift will be used to establish the Anne Welsh McNulty Institute for Women's Leadership a Villanova, where McNulty received her bachelor's degree in 1975.
NEWS
January 23, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Walter Fontanella, 83, and the love of his life, Tomasina Fontanella, 85, died 10 days apart after a happy 58-year marriage. The couple lived in Havertown for many years. Mr. Fontanella had long been ill with cancer when he died Saturday, Jan. 16, at Vitas Hospice at Jefferson Methodist Hospital. Mrs. Fontanella's death in her sleep at home on Wednesday, Jan. 6, was unexpected, the family said. It was perhaps fitting that they should exit almost together, since they were inseparable in life; they indulged in opera, art, and travel, and in their latter years took classes together at Villanova University.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Villanova University will rename its School of Law for a 1973 alumnus who went on to a career in investment management, marking the first time that one of the university's schools will carry the name of a donor. Charles "Chuck" Widger, founder and executive chairman of Brinker Capital, a Berwyn investment management firm, gave the school $25 million, the second-largest donation in Villanova's history, the university announced Wednesday. The money is largely to be used for scholarships for students who show leadership skills and an interest in both business and law - worlds that Widger has bridged.
NEWS
January 20, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITERS
A decade ago, Bruce L. Castor Jr. vowed that his announcement that he would not charge Bill Cosby in connection with an alleged sexual attack on a Temple University employee would be his final word on the topic. As Cosby now awaits trial on the same accusation, the case could hinge on what the former Montgomery County district attorney says next. Castor stands by his claim that he granted Cosby an oral "non-prosecution agreement" in 2005 - and is likely to say as much if he testifies at a pivotal hearing in two weeks.
NEWS
January 12, 2016 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Staff Writer
WHO WAS that guy? Someone from Villanova had just gone out for a pass in a game with Kentucky, caught the ball and scored a touchdown. The radio announcer broadcasting the game had no idea who it was. But 10 minutes later, after conducting a quick investigation, the announcer revealed that the mystery player was John J. Giordano, who, being a freshman, wasn't listed on the team roster. Back in Philly, John's family, listening to the game at the iconic family store in the Ninth Street Market, erupted in cheers.
NEWS
January 11, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Brian McDonnell lies in his small, dark room under the crucifix on his wall, praying Hail Marys on his blue plastic rosary beads. Symbols of a church that had forsaken him, but one that he has never abandoned. He worries that he is dying. It is all he thinks about. "I don't know how long I'm going to last," he said the other afternoon. "I just feel like I'm fading quick. I just fall asleep saying Hail Marys. " Brian suffers from schizophrenia, dementia, and depression. The manifestations of his mental illness are inextricably intertwined with the sexual abuse he suffered at the hands of a priest as an altar boy at now-closed St. Gregory's in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 2, 2016 | By Jessica Parks, Staff Writer
Lucien Roland Roy, 91, a mathematics professor at Villanova University for 40 years, died Monday, Dec. 28, of natural causes at a nursing home in Needham, Mass. Mr. Roy was known for his enthusiasm and high standards in the classroom, although colleagues said he was not to every student's taste. "He had a French Canadian accent, and he'd get quite wrapped up in a given theorem or something. Students would be standing there, and he's ranting and raving about how important this thing is," said David Strows, director of graduate programs.
NEWS
December 25, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sister Emellia Prokopik, 95, a former principal at St. Basil Academy and academic dean at Manor College, died of heart problems Thursday, Dec. 17, at her order's monastery in Abington. Sister Emellia's impact on the Sisters of the Order of St. Basil the Great and their monastery was vast. She wrote the province's history, held high-ranking posts in Rome from 1971 to 1989 and as superior general, and visited Basilian sisters throughout the world, including Ukraine, Hungary, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, Germany, Italy, Argentina, Brazil, Canada, and Australia.
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