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FOOD
May 6, 1992 | by Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
WEIGHT WATCHERS ULTIMATE 200 FROZEN ENTREES OR SANDWICHES. 16 varieties. $1.99 to $2.59 per 4- to 9.12-ounce box. BONNIE: I'm concerned about Weight Watchers new Ultimate 200 products. Not because they contain additives such as monosodium glutamate, vegetable gums, emulsifiers, preservatives and artificial colors and flavorings (which people who buy frozen dinners have come to expect), but because consumers might believe that these are meant to serve as a meal. Even the folks at Weight Watchers agree that this just isn't so. Each of these entrees of 200 calories or less could be part of a meal, but none supplies even close to a third of the nutrients needed in a day. The London broil in mushroom sauce, for instance, has a mere 110 calories, which isn't enough to even sustain a toddler!
FOOD
March 13, 1991 | by Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
KRAFT LIGHT SINGLES. Yellow or white American flavor. $1.95 per 6-ounce and $2.89 to $3.25 per 12-ounce package of 16 slices. BONNIE: Kraft's new Light Singles are slices of pasteurized process cheese that have one-third less fat than regular Kraft slices. Like Kraft's regular and most other processed cheese products, the new Light Slices are high in sodium, especially compared to natural cheese. (One 3/4-ounce slice of the light contains 310 milligrams.) If you need to watch sodium while reducing the amount of fat in your cheese, try Borden's Lite-line Reduced Sodium Pasteurized Process Cheese Product.
NEWS
August 12, 2016
CLASSIC TOMATO PANZANELLA This classic recipe is the updated version with summer tomatoes and croutonlike bread cubes. Feel free to experiment: use different kinds of breads and vegetables, stir in cheeses like mozzarella, parmesan or feta or add other new ingredients like olives, capers, hard-boiled eggs, pine nuts or whatever else you like in a salad. Add tuna (a traditional Italian addition), anchovies (also traditional) or grilled leftover shrimp for your own version of loaves and fishes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Over the course of Clark Gilbert's meandering career, one that in the last 15 years has seen him cook at no fewer than nine different restaurants (plus three stints at Taquet), the erudite chef has also tried his hand at food writing. One essay I particularly relished was his screed a few years ago against the BYOB scene, which he found generally overrated considering the underwhelming experiences often presented: "If you can't produce superior food in a 40-seat restaurant that's only open five days a week," he said, "then you suck.
FOOD
June 26, 1988 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Food Writer
Jamey Sherman has this notion that the ideal restaurant entree would arrive with accompaniments carefully planned to complement the dish in flavor, color, texture and seasonality. But where another restaurateur might dismiss such an idea as impractical or unnecessary - after all, don't most diners accept the same catchall starch and vegetable with every dish? - Sherman already has begun testing the concept on his patrons at Jamey's, the Manayunk restaurant he owns with his younger sister, Tami Sherman.
FOOD
August 19, 2016
A salad that stands up to heat In these hot-as-Hades days of August, I often find it too hot to cook and sometimes even too hot to eat much. Thus, I am often in search of a lunchtime salad that is satisfying but not too heavy. I didn't expect to find one at Zama, the sushi palace off Rittenhouse Square. But the California salad, a take on the ubiquitous California roll, is exactly what called to me from the menu on a recent sweltering afternoon. And I was not disappointed. What arrived was a mound of fresh spring greens tossed with long slender threads of cucumber and carrot, chunks of avocado, and a nice ration of fresh snow crab.
NEWS
November 11, 2007 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
In their final months at the William Penn Inn, where they worked to save for their big debut, it must have been a challenge for Joe and Amy McAtee to imagine the flight of modern fancy that would become Honey. The William Penn, in Gwynedd, is as classic as it gets - an enormous 1714 inn where the service is stodgy black-tie and the culinary high points (veal Oscar and snapper soup) are fossils from the Prime Rib-a-zoic era. The McAtees are grateful to the William Penn for the work, and respectful of its tradition.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Before Hadar Nisimi opened Prego, in Old City, he had spent just about all of his restaurant career surrounded by Northern Italian cooking. As a college student from Israel he began working first as a busboy, then a waiter. Next it was, as they call it, the front of the house (hosting), and then it was the back (helping manage the kitchen). His most recent stint was at Il Cantuccio, in Northern Liberties. Prior to that, he was at La Locanda del Ghiottone, in Old City.Now Nisimi has taken over the short-lived Monterey Grille, which has a generously attractive outdoor seating, and has fashioned a menu around Northern Italian and Mediterranean cooking.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1994 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
What do you do when you've spent 10 years as executive chef at a number of restaurants with good name recognition and even opened a place for investors? Frank DeCotis decided it was time to open his own restaurant. He selected a spot, at 24th and Lombard Streets, that most recently had been a Persian restaurant named Omar Khayyam. He named his place Foggia Ristorante - Foggia is the town in Italy that his parents came from - and decided he'd give it an Italian bent with emphasis on health-conscious dining.
FOOD
June 13, 1993 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Aglio, the new Italian-style restaurant on Passyunk Avenue, is one of those rare breeds that seem to have it all: a creative menu, designer-worthy presentation, and first-rate food. The restaurant has been open about a month. Its name is Italian for garlic, a plant that chef and co-owner Frank Audino is quite fond of. He also wears his love affair with food on his sleeve, so it's not unusual to see Audino stop by a table to check on his customers. "What I do is I listen," he said.
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