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NEWS
February 22, 2004 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
If an entree named airline chicken doesn't sound appealing, you're not alone. Nearly every self-appointed humorist who scans the diverse menu at Johnathan's Grill is apt to ask: "Where's the tray?" owner Johnathan Ioannidis said. He renovated a circa-1833 grain mill, installing booths and an open pizza kitchen, and opened his restaurant in August. The decor - all blond wood and warm, cream walls - gives the 98-seat restaurant a trendy, upscale look. At the same time, it's a place where patrons are encouraged to dine in a neighborly fashion, sharing appetizers or eating pizza.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
There is a timelessness to the Warsaw Cafe. On a hot, summer day, its cold borscht refreshes. Then, when winter wraps us in its shivering shroud, the borscht, steaming hot, is comforting. It's been 20 years since the small, cozy, European cafe opened on 16th Street just south of Spruce, and to have stopped by there in the early years is to drop in now. There is seating for about 40. Framed posters, from an announcement for a Hungarian flower show to a Russian travel ad, are accents for the crimson-colored tables and chairs that fill the narrow dining room.
FOOD
August 18, 1996 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
There were portobello mushrooms in the soup (with tarragon cream) on the California Cafe's lunch menu not long ago. On the same menu, grilled portobellos (with mozzarella, roma tomatoes, balsamic glaze and basil oil) costarred in a salad. The mammoth mushrooms topped a pizza (along with roasted garlic, garlic cream, three cheeses and herbs). A beefy, barbecued portobello (with smoked gouda and spicy onion rings) stuffed a sandwich stylishly. Why, they even put a pinch of portobello in the otherwise plain-Jane turkey meatloaf.
NEWS
February 20, 1998 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Guess what Silver did on Valentine's Day. She ordered Chinese food and worked on her upcoming debut album until 5 a.m., then went to bed - alone. Hard to believe, but that's the life of one of Philly's best-known party girls. Sexy, bubbly and drop-dead gorgeous, you'd think she'd have tons of men. And as the promoter of the popular Asian dance parties at the Warehouse nightclub on Delaware Avenue, the former Miss Chinatown socializes weekly with hundreds of single men. "Everybody thinks I have one . . . because I'm always out and I know a lot of people," said Silver, 30, whose real name is Un Kyong Cho. But "I'm single and I need a boyfriend," she said during dinner recently at one of her favorite restaurants, the Continental Restaurant & Martini Bar in Old City.
FOOD
July 15, 1990 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
At a time when other local eateries are sweating out another long, slow summer, the business at the London Restaurant and Bar seems to be looking up. The restaurant in the Art Museum neighborhood just added a 32-seat space adjacent to the main dining room, raising the capacity of the 11-year-old establishment to 140. If you're wondering why, consider the findings of two recent review meals. This is a place that works hard to please. It's a pretty and neat collection of dining rooms and a bar, with a greenhouse addition for those of us who like to keep in touch with the weather.
NEWS
December 7, 1986 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
The relatively new Greenwood Grille in the refurbished Jenkintown train station has all the infectious exuberance and irreverent energy of youth. With a California-chic menu, style and decor, this delightful place offers one of our most pleasant suburban dining experiences. The grille opened in May with an impressive cuisine that combines the experimental inclinations of California chefs with high Philadelphia standards of accomplishment. Chef Bill King offers mouthwatering dishes - grilled trout stuffed with walnuts and mushrooms, roast duck with black-bean barbecue sauce, or broiled salmon with raspberry vinegar cream sauce - that cry for attention.
FOOD
June 26, 1988 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Dorothy Parker, where are you when I need you? The telling of a recent lunch experience at a New Hope restaurant cries out for the acerbic wit of a writer who once described an actress' dramatic range as "running the gamut from A to B. " Lacking that, we'll just have to do with a simple recounting of a midday meal at the newly refurbished Logan Inn, a historic hostelry that at an earlier time was patronized by the late writer and her Algonquin...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
It's been said you can't go home again, but Nathan Dolente thought he'd give it a try. Of course things wouldn't be exactly the same, but somehow, he believed, it could still be home. So about a year ago, a restaurant appropriately called L2 opened at 22d and South, where, way back in 1983, Dolente and a partner created and operated Linoleum, a hip, '50-ish restaurant. In its day, Linoleum was a huge favorite and had a great run before closing in 1989. In 1996 Stephen Starr, of Old City's Continental, leased the building from Dolente and turned the place into a caviar-vodka bar with borscht and blinis called Cafe Republic.
FOOD
November 1, 1995 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
Had my first taste of wild boar the other night. It tasted like . . . no, not chicken, but something in between a veal chop and a pork chop. The civilized setting was Pattaya Grill, a new Thai-French restaurant on Chestnut Street near 40th, occupying the spot where Sweet Basil used to be. Pattaya is named for a beach resort in Thailand and has a sister restaurant directly across the street: Owner Manoch Pornmukda also operates the Thai Singha House...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2007
WHEN MEMBERS of the Chain Gang drove through New England a few weeks ago, it seemed like we passed 99 Restaurants about 99 times. Finding out the chain had migrated down to Philadelphia, we decided we had to check it out. Not being familiar with 99, the Gang found it to be similar to Applebees - big drinks, big All-American menu, big desserts, not too big a bill. At the location on Roosevelt Boulevard, we also found the service to be exceedingly friendly even when it was slow or forgetful.
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