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FOOD
August 30, 1995 | By Andrew Schloss, FOR THE INQUIRER
For too long, salad dressing has been typecast, playing sidekick to raw vegetables so efficiently that most of us never think of it in another role. It's time to correct such shortsightedness, for salad dressings are some of the easiest ways to bring a spark of exotic flavor to a meal, without additional time, expense or labor. And speaking of labor, Labor Day is a perfect time to take advantage of their potential. Salad dressings can be the piquant glaze on a roasting chicken, or the marinade for a breast of lamb.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Over the course of Clark Gilbert's meandering career, one that in the last 15 years has seen him cook at no fewer than nine different restaurants (plus three stints at Taquet), the erudite chef has also tried his hand at food writing. One essay I particularly relished was his screed a few years ago against the BYOB scene, which he found generally overrated considering the underwhelming experiences often presented: "If you can't produce superior food in a 40-seat restaurant that's only open five days a week," he said, "then you suck.
NEWS
May 18, 2008 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Erin O'Shea could have been the "Taboon Mistress," queen of the flatbread hearth that is the centerpiece at Zahav, the splashy new Old City Israeli from Michael Solomonov and Steven Cook. "But I wanted Marigold," O'Shea said. "I didn't want to leave. " She had been working behind the line for two years at Marigold Kitchen, and toiling for nearly a decade in all for the chance to show the world her grits. A longtime Southerner, she had found her drive for cooking in Texas and Virginia before coming North.
NEWS
November 28, 1997 | By Morris Thompson
I love food, so I always used to enjoy this time of year. I love even the inner organs of beasts and fowl, to paraphrase James Joyce. But this season is less fun than it used to be since I learned that the Grinch isn't a creature of Dr. Seuss. It's middle age. I have to allow as how the hazards of aging are not wholly new to me. I've hit a variety of milestones already. Like looking better in clothes than out of them. Like needing my sleep. Like the dread "B" word ceasing to be "bisexual" and becoming "bifocal.
NEWS
February 22, 2004 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
If an entree named airline chicken doesn't sound appealing, you're not alone. Nearly every self-appointed humorist who scans the diverse menu at Johnathan's Grill is apt to ask: "Where's the tray?" owner Johnathan Ioannidis said. He renovated a circa-1833 grain mill, installing booths and an open pizza kitchen, and opened his restaurant in August. The decor - all blond wood and warm, cream walls - gives the 98-seat restaurant a trendy, upscale look. At the same time, it's a place where patrons are encouraged to dine in a neighborly fashion, sharing appetizers or eating pizza.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
There is a timelessness to the Warsaw Cafe. On a hot, summer day, its cold borscht refreshes. Then, when winter wraps us in its shivering shroud, the borscht, steaming hot, is comforting. It's been 20 years since the small, cozy, European cafe opened on 16th Street just south of Spruce, and to have stopped by there in the early years is to drop in now. There is seating for about 40. Framed posters, from an announcement for a Hungarian flower show to a Russian travel ad, are accents for the crimson-colored tables and chairs that fill the narrow dining room.
FOOD
August 18, 1996 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
There were portobello mushrooms in the soup (with tarragon cream) on the California Cafe's lunch menu not long ago. On the same menu, grilled portobellos (with mozzarella, roma tomatoes, balsamic glaze and basil oil) costarred in a salad. The mammoth mushrooms topped a pizza (along with roasted garlic, garlic cream, three cheeses and herbs). A beefy, barbecued portobello (with smoked gouda and spicy onion rings) stuffed a sandwich stylishly. Why, they even put a pinch of portobello in the otherwise plain-Jane turkey meatloaf.
NEWS
February 20, 1998 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Guess what Silver did on Valentine's Day. She ordered Chinese food and worked on her upcoming debut album until 5 a.m., then went to bed - alone. Hard to believe, but that's the life of one of Philly's best-known party girls. Sexy, bubbly and drop-dead gorgeous, you'd think she'd have tons of men. And as the promoter of the popular Asian dance parties at the Warehouse nightclub on Delaware Avenue, the former Miss Chinatown socializes weekly with hundreds of single men. "Everybody thinks I have one . . . because I'm always out and I know a lot of people," said Silver, 30, whose real name is Un Kyong Cho. But "I'm single and I need a boyfriend," she said during dinner recently at one of her favorite restaurants, the Continental Restaurant & Martini Bar in Old City.
FOOD
July 15, 1990 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
At a time when other local eateries are sweating out another long, slow summer, the business at the London Restaurant and Bar seems to be looking up. The restaurant in the Art Museum neighborhood just added a 32-seat space adjacent to the main dining room, raising the capacity of the 11-year-old establishment to 140. If you're wondering why, consider the findings of two recent review meals. This is a place that works hard to please. It's a pretty and neat collection of dining rooms and a bar, with a greenhouse addition for those of us who like to keep in touch with the weather.
NEWS
December 7, 1986 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
The relatively new Greenwood Grille in the refurbished Jenkintown train station has all the infectious exuberance and irreverent energy of youth. With a California-chic menu, style and decor, this delightful place offers one of our most pleasant suburban dining experiences. The grille opened in May with an impressive cuisine that combines the experimental inclinations of California chefs with high Philadelphia standards of accomplishment. Chef Bill King offers mouthwatering dishes - grilled trout stuffed with walnuts and mushrooms, roast duck with black-bean barbecue sauce, or broiled salmon with raspberry vinegar cream sauce - that cry for attention.
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