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NEWS
November 11, 2007 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
In their final months at the William Penn Inn, where they worked to save for their big debut, it must have been a challenge for Joe and Amy McAtee to imagine the flight of modern fancy that would become Honey. The William Penn, in Gwynedd, is as classic as it gets - an enormous 1714 inn where the service is stodgy black-tie and the culinary high points (veal Oscar and snapper soup) are fossils from the Prime Rib-a-zoic era. The McAtees are grateful to the William Penn for the work, and respectful of its tradition.
FOOD
August 23, 2007
Gourmet redux We were sad to see Andros Gourmet Foods decamp from the Reading Terminal Market. But its replacement, Everyday Gourmet, is more than filling its shoes, offering prepared foods that have the robust flavor that Whole Foods often fails to deliver. Chicken salad with pistachios and citrus vinaigrette, and a colorful sweet potato salad with cilantro and maple vinaigrette are two winners. And the root-beer-glazed pork chop survives rewarming. But a vegetarian special, shown here, has the panache - a stack of hearty, herb-roasted squash, eggplant and pepper over asiago polenta, a rosemary sprig stuck in its cap.
NEWS
July 1, 2007
If you live in South Jersey, there's a good chance that you've traveled at least once on Route 70 through Cherry Hill. Years ago, it was known as the strip. Today, it's known for its traffic. There are wonderful places along Route 70 and a new gem is Joe Palombo's Mirabella Cafe in the Barclay Farms Shopping Center. The Discreet Diner visited recently for lunch and was pleasantly surprised. The room has the feel of a European bistro. Wood tables are set with white cloth napkins and the floor is Mexican tile.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2007
WHEN MEMBERS of the Chain Gang drove through New England a few weeks ago, it seemed like we passed 99 Restaurants about 99 times. Finding out the chain had migrated down to Philadelphia, we decided we had to check it out. Not being familiar with 99, the Gang found it to be similar to Applebees - big drinks, big All-American menu, big desserts, not too big a bill. At the location on Roosevelt Boulevard, we also found the service to be exceedingly friendly even when it was slow or forgetful.
NEWS
January 30, 2005 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As its name implies, Catherine's is a friendly, neighborhood kind of place. Catherine's, a dinner-only BYO in Unionville run by a young married couple, is more refined and sophisticated than gregarious and down-home, however, partly because of its feng shui d?cor and mainly because of its eclectic cuisine. The nine-entr?e menu includes all the favorites that define 21st-century dining - sea scallops, rack of lamb and tuna steak, among them. They are prepared with a great deal of originality and simplicity in mind.
NEWS
August 29, 2004 | By Joyce Gemperlein FOR THE INQUIRER
It is too late to save the Caesar salad, but with your help we may be able to rescue the Cobb. A hallmark of this country is that we take things - food is included here - and run with them. We abandon rules, and these innovations often are improvements. Too often, though, we dumb down what is a decent concept. Reality television and Caesar salad have this in common. What has happened to both can make a liberal feel like a conservative. I knew Caesar salad was on the road to becoming stupid when, in 1986, I was traveling across the country and stopped at a restaurant somewhere in the Midwest.
FOOD
March 11, 2004 | By Annette Gooch FOR THE INQUIRER
Quiche: First it was classic, then some thought it was kitsch. Now it's making a comeback. Truth is, quiche has been around a long, long time, and it's not going away. This open-faced, savory pie originated in France's easternmost provinces, Lorraine and Alsace, along the German border. While quiche is French, the name is derived from kuchen, German for cake. The best-known quiche is an authentic quiche Lorraine - rich with cream and eggs and heavy with bacon, but with no cheese.
NEWS
February 22, 2004 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
If an entree named airline chicken doesn't sound appealing, you're not alone. Nearly every self-appointed humorist who scans the diverse menu at Johnathan's Grill is apt to ask: "Where's the tray?" owner Johnathan Ioannidis said. He renovated a circa-1833 grain mill, installing booths and an open pizza kitchen, and opened his restaurant in August. The decor - all blond wood and warm, cream walls - gives the 98-seat restaurant a trendy, upscale look. At the same time, it's a place where patrons are encouraged to dine in a neighborly fashion, sharing appetizers or eating pizza.
NEWS
June 29, 2003 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Without so much as a blip of cosmic change, Philadelphia has moved a little closer to the suburbs. At least, that is the carefully crafted impression that the owners of Roux 3 - a stylish new bistro that has evolved since it opened here nine months ago - have created. Billed as a "Center City caliber restaurant," Roux 3 seems to exemplify the best of urbane fine dining. That might include an executive chef skilled in French cooking techniques and an in-house pastry chef who creates elaborate geometric constructions worthy of an architectural award.
FOOD
October 9, 2002 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You may wake up some morning, maneuver into the kitchen, survey the inside of the fridge, and exclaim, "Oh, no! Not toast and eggs again!" But take heart. Every country has its standard up-and-at-'em fare. And somewhere in Stockholm this morning, someone probably wandered into the kitchen and, through the haze of the day's stirring consciousness, mumbled in perfect Swedish: "Oh, no! Not herring again!" And longed, maybe, for a good bowl of boxed cereal. This grass-is-greener mentality isn't altogether reasonable.
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