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NEWS
June 26, 2012 | Sandy Bauers
When Molly Rouse-Terlevich, a Bryn Mawr mother of two, goes to clean the kitchen counter, she reaches for a spray bottle.   In it is a solution of half water, half white vinegar. When she cleans the floor, same stuff. The bathroom, same stuff. She runs vinegar through the dishwasher to reduce the buildup from hard water, and adds it to especially dirty loads of laundry. And she's been at it for several years. "We use it for virtually everything except the cleaning that would require slightly more grit," she said.
FOOD
December 5, 1990 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Is it safe to use vinegar to clean stains off a fiberglass shower stall? - O.C.T. Dear O.C.T.: Vinegar can be useful for removing rust stains, soap scum and mineral deposits from fiberglass, acrylic and porcelain bath fixtures. However, it's best to rinse immediately with clear water afterward; don't leave the vinegar on for longer than 10 minutes. Some older porcelain fixtures may not be acid resistant. Avoid using vinegar or any other acid on them. Dear Polly: The tip I would like to share is what to do with the little cards that come with flower arrangements.
FOOD
October 18, 1989 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: The chrome faucets on my bathroom sink are getting a crusty white lime buildup, especially around the faucet handles and in hard-to-reach places. Is there an easy way to clean these areas? - P.L.E. Dear P.L.E.: Help is at hand in the humble but hard-working form of an ordinary toothbrush and an inexpensive bottle of white vinegar. If wiping with a vinegar-soaked sponge doesn't do the job (and those tiny places certainly are hard to reach!), saturate a cloth or paper towel with vinegar and lay it over the crusty places for a few minutes.
FOOD
December 18, 2015
Makes 13/4 quarts 2 quarts apple cores and peels 2 quarts water 1/3 cup sugar 1. Put the apple cores and peels in a large glass or ceramic bowl. Dissolve the sugar in the water and pour over the cores and peels. Cover with a plate and weight down with something heavy to keep the solids submerged. Cover the entire bowl with cheesecloth or a kitchen towel and leave on the counter out of direct sunlight for 7 days. 2. Strain the cores and peels from the liquid and discard the solids.
FOOD
June 19, 1991 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Can you tell me how to remove a shiny spot from each of the knees of my good wool pants? They're not stains, just shiny spots on each knee. - E.P. Dear E.P.: Try this: Sponge the spots with warm white vinegar, then cover with a damp cloth and press with a warm iron. Allow the fabric to dry completely, then brush gently with a soft brush. This should raise the nap of the fabric so the shine disappears. This is just one of the handy household uses of vinegar. Did you know that you can practically clean your whole house with just two kitchen staples - baking soda and vinegar?
FOOD
March 18, 2010 | By Carole Kotkin, McClatchy Newspapers
Little-known in this country until about 15 years ago, balsamic vinegar has been warmly embraced by American cooks. We drizzle it on salads and steamed vegetables, sprinkle it on sautes, and use it to marinate strawberries. You can find an array of balsamic vinegars in most supermarkets, right next to the cider and wine vinegars. Prices in specialty stores can top $100 for a small bottle, so it helps to understand the origin and subtleties of balsamic vinegar. Unlike most vinegars, which start with fruit juice or wine, balsamic starts with unfermented trebbiano grape must (crushed grapes)
FOOD
May 7, 1995 | By Jim Burns, FOR THE INQUIRER
These days, who doesn't like hot? While salsa takes the lion's share of sales, I have a fondness in my heart for the unsung heroes of singe - hot sauces. These have sprung up as a cottage industry around the country, burning tongues and lips from Alamagordo to Albany. But few, very few indeed, are without the tart smack of vinegar within their formulas. Why should the exclusion of vinegar mean anything to the fire-eating public? Well, for most people it won't make a bit of difference, but for those with a yeast allergy, vinegar may just be the condiment they had to give up. Vinegar is full of yeast.
FOOD
April 20, 1994 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Your great-grandmother probably soaked her yellowed table linens in sour milk to whiten them. Perhaps the child in you recalls seeing stale bread wiped over the wallpaper at Grandma's house to absorb oily dirt. Certainly we're all familiar with club soda as the first and safest choice for surreptitious stain removal at parties and in restaurants. And everyone must know someone with a box of baking soda in the refrigerator. These are just a few of numerous cleanup tricks that rely on food products.
LIVING
May 19, 2006 | By Therese Ciesinski FOR THE INQUIRER
Gardeners throughout the region are taking up arms in the annual war on weeds. And the stakes are high. Weeds take up valuable real estate, hogging sunlight and sucking water away from the plants you want to grow. That can reduce the desirable plants' yield of flowers or fruit. In addition, certain weeds attract insect pests and diseases. Weeds survive by being incredibly adaptive, much more so than garden plants. They produce more seed, which germinates more quickly and under harsher conditions than do those of garden plants.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1992 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Judy Street's business is what they had in mind when the term cottage industry was coined. Working from her 19th-century house on a pretty 17-acre farm in Chester County, Street began her little venture in 1975, maybe 1974 - she's not certain. Today, she divides her time among gardens, kitchen and a large chicken coop turned herb house, brewing and sampling her herb-flavored gourmet vinegars and vinaigrettes, marketed under the label of her home and place of business, Apple Pie Farm, in Malvern.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
June 16, 2016
Makes 8 servings 2 pounds colorful heirloom tomatoes, room temperature 1/2 pound pitted whole sour cherries Cracked pepper Very thinly sliced tender scallion, rinsed in ice-cold water 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon fruity extra-virgin olive oil 3 tablespoons sherry vinegar 4 slices well-toasted miche, ciabatta, or peasant bread 1 large garlic clove, halved Handful fresh basil, torn 1. Cut tomatoes into pretty,...
FOOD
June 3, 2016
Makes 8 servings 5½ pounds beef cheeks 3 12-ounce bottles Flemish red ale 1 bouquet garni (sprigs of herbs such as thyme, bay leaf, basil, and rosemary tied together in a bundle) 1 pound onions, peeled and chopped Oil or butter for sauteing 1 quart veal stock ½ cup vinegar 8 tablespoons mustard 31/2 ounce slice gingerbread 1. The day before serving, cut the beef cheeks into pieces about 1½ inch square and place in a bowl along with three-quarters of the beer and the bouquet garni.
FOOD
March 17, 2016
Makes 6 servings 2 medium cucumbers, peeled and sliced thin 1/3 cup sugar 1/3 cup white vinegar 3 tablespoons water 1/2 teaspoon salt 1. Wash and peel cucumbers. 2. Slice into 1/8 to 1/4 -inch rounds - as uniform as possible. 3. Combine sugar, vinegar, water, and salt in a small bowl. Stir to dissolve the salt and sugar. 4. Add the cucumbers and let stand at least 15 minutes at room temperature. 5. Serve on Sloppy Joes (see accompanying recipe)
FOOD
December 18, 2015
Makes 13/4 quarts 2 quarts apple cores and peels 2 quarts water 1/3 cup sugar 1. Put the apple cores and peels in a large glass or ceramic bowl. Dissolve the sugar in the water and pour over the cores and peels. Cover with a plate and weight down with something heavy to keep the solids submerged. Cover the entire bowl with cheesecloth or a kitchen towel and leave on the counter out of direct sunlight for 7 days. 2. Strain the cores and peels from the liquid and discard the solids.
NEWS
July 6, 2015 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
I'm trying to understand when suntan lotion got weird. I remember the days when baby oil and vinegar counted as suntan lotion. Yes, you read that correctly. The Flying Scottolines used to go to the Jersey Shore for two weeks every summer, and Mother Mary would mix baby oil and red wine vinegar in a bottle before we left for a day at the beach. I have no idea where she got the recipe. Maybe the Mayo Clinic. Or the Mayonnaise Clinic. Anyway, we would slather on baby oil and vinegar, dressing ourselves like a salad.
NEWS
March 13, 2015
HOMEMADE FIRE CIDER RECIPE 1/2 cup peeled, shredded/diced ginger root 1/2 cup peeled, shredded/diced horseradish root 1/2 cup peeled, diced turmeric OR 1/4 cup additional ginger and 1/4 cup additional horseradish 1/2 cup white onion, chopped 1/4 cup minced or crushed garlic 2 jalapeno peppers, chopped Zest and juice from 2 lemons Raw apple cider vinegar Raw, organic honey to taste Put ginger, horseradish, turmeric,...
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
TAKE A SWIG. Go ahead. All at once, a flood of hot, spicy, sweet flavors converge in your mouth to create a warm, hell, yeah! sensation all the way down to your belly. You've just experienced Fire Cider, an apple-cider-vinegar-based health tonic produced in the Berkshires by Shire City Herbals. Fire Cider is selling like gangbusters coast to coast - and locally at places like Weavers Way in Chestnut Hill, Essene Market and Art in the Age downtown and MOM's Organic Market, in Bryn Mawr.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2014
BLEND HAMBURGER WITH ONION COMPOTE & HONEY VINAIGRETTE SAUCE 18 ounces hamburger (fat content about 20 percent) 2 tablespoons cumin 4 yellow onions 1 tablespoon butter 1 tablespoon sugar 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar Water Salt to taste Honey Vinaigrette Sauce (see below) 4 ounces Ossau-Iraty or other hard goat cheese, sliced thin 4 hamburger buns, split For burger: Mix cumin into hamburger meat and let stand at least 90 minutes, or overnight if possible, in the refrigerator.
NEWS
July 3, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HERBERT Ginensky had this thing about vinegar. The health-giving and curative powers of this simple ingredient, known to every cook, were taken to extremes by this man who often let his imagination run away with him. He insisted you could take vinegar internally and externally. Try bathing your feet in it. And, oh yes, dark chocolate was in the same salubrious category. And Herbert was not shy about promoting both. He passed out photocopied brochures extolling their benefits.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
THE ADAGE says "the way to a man's heart is through his stomach. " As newlyweds Eric and Autumn Levine discovered, that wisdom also applies to women. "When we first began dating, he made me these delicious scallops," said Autumn Levine. "I knew then he was a keeper, because I don't cook. " An attorney by day, Eric Levine enjoys cooking on nights and weekends. He has fond childhood memories of his mother's honey-mustard chicken and his father's grilling, but he didn't become interested in cooking until he hit college.
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