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Vinyl

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NEWS
December 31, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
More this week on vinyl floors being discolored by rubber-backed rugs. I really didn't know how widespread the problem was when I first wrote about it because I don't have vinyl flooring, but it is indeed a problem. Lowe's employee Jerry McHale from West Lancaster said he had the same situation occur in his house, only the floor turned a deep purple, and it could not be cleaned. McHale and his wife had placed a rubber-backed floor mat inside the French door in their kitchen that led to the deck.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2011 | By Leanne Italie, Associated Press
NEW YORK - In most ways, Sarah McCarthy is your typical high schooler. She has a job and college plans, but also a peculiar passion: She's a vinyl fan. That's right. She likes analog. And none of that hipster new stuff or a USB-ready turntable from Urban Outfitters. To this 16-year-old senior from Centreville, Md., there's nothing like the raw crackle, the depth of sound, her delicate hand on diamond-tipped stylus to spin the dusty stash of records she found in her grandfather's basement.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By Brigette ReDavid, Special to The Inquirer
Two record shops in Ardmore are going against the tide that is sweeping more cassette tapes and compact discs into music collections. They refuse, in fact, to sing an epitaph to vinyl LPs. Mads Records, at 9 W. Lancaster Ave., and Plastic Fantastic Used Record Exchange, 26 W. Lancaster Ave., are among the few places where customers still can buy records, and the owners say the stores plan to stay that way. "I don't think as many people are...
FOOD
April 13, 1994 | by Anne B. Adams and Nancy Nash-Cummings, Special to the Daily News
Dear Anne and Nan: A problem of utter importance has entered my dull and meaningless life. An answer is needed immediately! I need to know how to remove pen marks from vinyl. - Phillip M. Kittanning, Pa. Dear Phillip: Actually, this is not an insignificant question but one we are frequently asked, though perhaps not with the same desperation. You have a number of choices, and perhaps one of them will work. If someone in your household uses hair spray, try that. Or rub ink marks with rubbing alcohol.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
The past has caught up with the future, or maybe it's the other way around, on the sweaty factory floor of Independent Record Pressing just off I-295 in Bordentown. Most of the workers there weren't born when what they're making today was big. General manager Sean Rutkowski, 46, was, though he came of age in the era of cassettes and CDs. But in a surprising return from near-death, vinyl records are back on the turntable, in demand by recording artists and music consumers alike after years of relegation to flea markets and used-record stores.
NEWS
February 12, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, MUSIC CRITIC
When we first meet Richie Finestra, the hero of Vinyl , the new HBO drama about the 1970s glory days of the music business premiering with a two-hour Martin Scorsese-directed pilot at 9 p.m. Sunday, the exec played by Bobby Cannavale is scoring an eight-ball of cocaine. It's 1973, and Finestra, the stressed-out head of American Century records, is in rundown Soho in Manhattan. Before breaking off his rearview mirror for a snorting surface, he has a brief conversation with his dealer.
FOOD
May 4, 1994 | by Anne B. Adams and Nancy Nash-Cummings, Special to the Daily News
Dear Anne and Nan: We have a shiny brown linoleum floor that is plagued with dull scuff marks. The scuff marks are not dirt, but are due to the removal of the shiny coating. Is there any way to correct these marks? - Holly Eaves, Pawcatuck, Conn. Dear Holly: It's hard to tell how serious your problem is from your description. If the linoleum or vinyl isn't seriously worn, dampen baking soda with water and rub the scuff marks in a circular motion until they are gone. Rinse, then wax. If your floor is newer and of the "no-wax" kind, apply an Armstrong product called "New Beginning," available wherever Armstrong flooring products are sold.
REAL_ESTATE
September 10, 1993 | By Al Carrell, FOR THE INQUIRER
Those vinyl tiles used for flooring are popular and can be a fairly easy way for a do-it-yourselfer to successfully install a new floor. After you've done the work on such a project, it's always disheartening to have things go wrong. Here are some ways to fight back. One common problem is that a lone tile will start to curl along an edge. If you don't fix it, somebody will trip on it. The first thing to do is apply a little heat to make the tile more pliable. Either use a heat gun or press the edge with an iron.
NEWS
December 11, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
They were still pressing 78 rpm records in the late 1940s when a Long Islander named Allen B. Jacobs took an office on Broadway, in what was then the heart of Manhattan's music business. Jacobs' new on-the-cheap label, Tikva Records, would eventually be pressing 12-inch LPs, just one change transforming the recording industry. But the changes that interested Jacobs were the ones he captured on vinyl, no matter what size. He started a record label - its name is Hebrew for "hope" and is also the name of Israel's national anthem, Hatikva, or "the hope" - that thrived on change and representing it, and then, when the change had become the status quo, died out. Now, the music Tikva sold has been rediscovered (rediscovered more than "found," as it was never really lost; Tikva records have sat all along in basements, attics, and bins at vinyl trading posts)
REAL_ESTATE
August 10, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Q uestion: My townhouse is built on a slab, and I have ceramic tile in the kitchen. A few of the tiles have chips where items were dropped. Is it possible to have the ceramic tile removed and replaced with vinyl? This is not a job I would do myself; I would hire a professional. Just looking for some ideas and what the pros and cons might be. Answer: I'm glad you will be hiring a professional, because I've seen so many botched jobs by amateurs. It can be done. I assume the tiles are in a mortar bed on the slab.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 27, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
The past has caught up with the future, or maybe it's the other way around, on the sweaty factory floor of Independent Record Pressing just off I-295 in Bordentown. Most of the workers there weren't born when what they're making today was big. General manager Sean Rutkowski, 46, was, though he came of age in the era of cassettes and CDs. But in a surprising return from near-death, vinyl records are back on the turntable, in demand by recording artists and music consumers alike after years of relegation to flea markets and used-record stores.
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
Rich Cohen, a veteran journalist and co-creator of HBO's Vinyl , achieves the unlikely feat of adding a worthy Rolling Stones book to an overcrowded shelf, full of personal recollections and astute observations. Spiegel & Grau, $30.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The drummer is so often behind the rest of the band, a position that reflects a general, and shameful, lack of credibility for the instrumentalist. "They get called the least musical aspect of any group," says Joe Ankenbrand, a veteran record seller and the onetime rhythm maker for legendary Philly electro-punks Bunnydrums and Jukebox Zeros. "Always in the back, eyes rolled into our skulls," agrees Eric Slick, a Philadelphia drummer/multi-instrumentalist for Dr. Dog and Lithuania.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
You might be tickled to learn that Philly-based Urban Outfitters will showcase a "Make Your Own Vinyl Record" station in its pop-up concept store Space24Twenty previewing next week at the South by Southwest music, film and interactive conference in Austin, Texas. But don't hold your breath waiting for this DIY music concept to go nationwide, warned Urban's marketing partners at the retro turntable company Crosley Radio. When the story of vinyl records' surprising resurgence is told, Urban Outfitters will loom large.
NEWS
February 14, 2016
The Walking Dead. AMC's zombie juggernaut returns just in time for Valentine's Day. Is there a better way to celebrate love than watching a zombie get disem- boweled? 9 p.m. Sunday on AMC. Vinyl. Martin Scorsese, Boardwalk Empire 's Terence Winter, and Mick Jagger team up for this look at the music industry in the 1970s as seen through Bobby Cannavale's exec. The two-hour premiere is at 9 p.m. Sunday on HBO. Last Week Tonight With John Oliver. Rarely has a show felt as essential as Oliver's.
NEWS
February 14, 2016
* THE WALKING DEAD. 9 p.m. Sunday, AMC. Season 6 resumes. Because nothing says Valentine's Day like the ever-present danger of a massacre by (or of) the staggering hordes of the undead. * LAST WEEK TONIGHT WITH JOHN OLIVER. 11 p.m. Sunday, HBO. The Peabody-winning series returns for a fourth season of finding the funny in stories too complicated (or ratings-unfriendly) for most TV news shows. Now that it's 2016, Oliver may be forced to acknowledge the U.S. presidential elections, but chances are he'll do it in ways we least expect.
NEWS
February 12, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, MUSIC CRITIC
When we first meet Richie Finestra, the hero of Vinyl , the new HBO drama about the 1970s glory days of the music business premiering with a two-hour Martin Scorsese-directed pilot at 9 p.m. Sunday, the exec played by Bobby Cannavale is scoring an eight-ball of cocaine. It's 1973, and Finestra, the stressed-out head of American Century records, is in rundown Soho in Manhattan. Before breaking off his rearview mirror for a snorting surface, he has a brief conversation with his dealer.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Jeff Davis took a gutsy step three years ago buying a rundown commercial property for $105,000 in East Germantown. The 41-year-old father of two did so based on one simple truth: You can't fashion a serving bowl from a digital track of the Beatles - or any other recording artists for that matter. But you can from vinyl. His company, Vinylux, uses predominantly 33s and 45s for its designs, although products involving 78s are coming. The outgrowth of a school project while Davis was pursuing a master's degree in industrial design at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD)
REAL_ESTATE
August 10, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Q uestion: My townhouse is built on a slab, and I have ceramic tile in the kitchen. A few of the tiles have chips where items were dropped. Is it possible to have the ceramic tile removed and replaced with vinyl? This is not a job I would do myself; I would hire a professional. Just looking for some ideas and what the pros and cons might be. Answer: I'm glad you will be hiring a professional, because I've seen so many botched jobs by amateurs. It can be done. I assume the tiles are in a mortar bed on the slab.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Back in 2008, Record Store Day was launched as a hopeful holiday aiming to buck up struggling independent music retailers desperate to lure customers. The situation was dire. The Tower Records chain had closed in 2006, and CD sales were shrinking. Vinyl was an outmoded format that barely amounted to a drop in a music industry bucket with a hole in it. "The general consensus," said the day's cofounder Carrie Colitton, "was that record stores were dead. " The seventh annual Record Store Day is set to take place Saturday.
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