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NEWS
November 21, 2008 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Practice, practice, practice. It took Lynn Kebetz more than 40 years to get to play her viola at a Manhattan concert. When she did, she was part of the backup group on the final stop of a 2004 East Coast tour by none less than Linda Ronstadt. The touring musicians "ended up playing [their] last concert at the Beacon Theatre" on upper Broadway, said Mrs. Kebetz's husband, Igor. "It was the pinnacle of her career," he added. On Sunday, Lynn White Kebetz, 56, of Levittown, an account supervisor at the Philadelphia Gas Works, died of gastric cancer at Temple University Hospital.
NEWS
December 26, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Karen Tuttle, 90, a viola virtuoso and teacher who was famous for her coordination technique, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Thursday, Dec. 16, at her home in Center City. After performing in Philadelphia in 1959, Ms. Tuttle was praised by an Inquirer music critic for "a mellifluous viola tone with technique, intonation, and clarity of phrasing. " That year, a Washington Post critic called her playing "eloquent" and added, "She has a solid, alluring tone and seeks music in which the viola can sing.
NEWS
February 6, 1988 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
It is often the principal players appearing as soloists who give Philadelphia Orchestra audiences a wider view of the music world. The touring virtuosos tend to play conservators to a small number of major works, while their counterparts within the orchestra play the radicals, promoting new works and valuable pieces that lack sponsors. Joseph de Pasquale played the pioneer last night. As soloist in Bohuslav Martinu's Rhapsody-Concerto for viola, he was playing the work's first performance here.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1995 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Terell Stafford was 12, he began taking viola lessons. Two or three months later, the teacher told his parents that he had absolutely no talent for music. The viola lessons ended. The youngster was not discouraged easily, though. Next he began playing around with the guitar, but that didn't pan out either. Then, at 13, having had it with stringed instruments, Stafford discovered the trumpet. He has been impressing people with his talent ever since. Stafford, a resident of Downingtown, has a brand-new CD out on the Candid label, Time to Let Go. It's the 28-year-old musician's first album as a leader.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1998 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
William Shakespeare subtitled his final comedy "What You Will," and with good reason. So many riches jostle for attention in Twelfth Night, so many disparate but complementary moods tumble one upon the next, that the play presents its interpreter with a staggering array of choices. Moonstruck romance, knockabout humor, shimmering poetry . . . how to balance them all in a coherent whole? Most directors opt to go heavy on the humor - the simplest choice, and a generally effective one if suitable players are at hand.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
WASHINGTON - Derogatory jokes about the viola are probably waiting to be made over the fact that Jennifer Higdon's concerto for that instrument sat for five years on a waiting list before arriving at its premiere Saturday at the Library of Congress. In truth, the Philadelphia composer was keen to give the ordinarily brooding instrument a levity other viola concertos lack, but first she had to finish her opera Cold Mountain . The concerto, written for violist and Curtis Institute president Roberto Diaz and the Curtis Chamber Orchestra, is ultimately concerned with getting down to essentials, yielding distinctive, under-the-surface strength.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Philadelphia Orchestra presents the interactive music program "Sound All Around," for ages 3 to 5, at the Academy of Music on Saturday and Monday. The interactive program introduces audience members to the viola. Assistant principal viola Kerri Ryan and master storyteller Charlotte Blake Alston will guide kids on a learning musical journey. Kids can hear stories along with music and sing while pretending to play the string instrument. They can get a close look at the viola, nurturing their fascination and curiosity.
NEWS
February 25, 2005 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Settlement Music School teacher was killed yesterday morning in a head-on collision on Route 42 in Camden County, police said. Anthony Simmons, 38, taught viola and violin at the South Philadelphia-based school and was violist for the Serafin String Quartet and the new-music ensemble Relache. Simmons, of Woodbury, was driving to a meeting for the Ocean City Pops, said Settlement's executive director, Robert Capanna. He was headed south through Gloucester Township about 7 a.m. when a northbound driver lost control of her Mitsubishi Eclipse, skidded across the grassy median, and plowed into Simmons' Honda Civic, police said.
NEWS
February 23, 1995 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Challenging tradition, violist Beth Dzwil of Ambler has begun to move her instrument out of the background and feature it in solo settings. For the last year, she has been working at Upper Dublin Lutheran Church with pianist David Spitko, and now says she is ready for her "coming out. " She and Spitko will be joined by soprano Jacqueline Smith during a concert at 7:30 p.m. Sunday at the Becoming Center in Ambler. The two major works on the program are the Concerto in B minor by Handel and the Arpeggione Sonata by Schubert.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1988 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Mozart had fallen in love with a vivacious singer but had to settle for marrying her sister. The composer played the viola in later life, and violists see in this man who married his first love's sister the image of their own artistic existence. Most violists were violinists early on. They shifted to the lower-voiced instrument because of a teacher's suggestion, a performance opportunity or, increasingly, a late-growing passion for an instrument just taking its place as a soloist's vehicle.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Viola Davis: Love WW! Suicide Squad star Viola Davis wants to remind you that girls also look up to comic book superheroes. "Wonder Woman was my hero, that was it for me," Davis tells People and Entertainment Weekly editorial director Jess Cagle . Davis says Wonder Woman projected power, authority, know-how. "I just thought to myself - because I was bullied growing up - I said, 'If I could be Wonder Woman I could take care of all the bullies, and I could be cute doing it,' and so that's it. " Will Davis see the movie version?
NEWS
April 19, 2016 | By Hugh Hunter, STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre is now running a sparkling, fast-paced revival of Twelfth Night . With stunning brilliance, Shakespeare turns the farce staple of mistaken identity into a huge metaphor for human frailty. Director Carmen Khan immediately grabs your attention. Her stage is like a ship deck with its burnished woods, rear railing, and changeable, luminous sky (thanks to set designer Bethanie Wampol). The sound of waves and swirling seagulls (thanks to composer and sound designer Fabian Obispo)
NEWS
August 20, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When David Socolofsky was a teenager, and his mother, Byrnina, was in her early 40s, they went to the First Presbyterian Church in Pitman for a special occasion. "It was a Christmas Eve concert," David Socolofsky said, "and we played 'Gesu Bambino' ," a 1917 Italian carol based on "O Come, All Ye Faithful. " She played the viola. He played the cello. "And when we walked out," he said, "it was snowing. " He would go on to be assistant principal cellist for the Oregon Symphony in Portland.
NEWS
June 24, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
He was born in South Philadelphia, married Franco-Russian royalty, and reigned for five decades as one of the great violists of the 20th century. Joseph de Pasquale, 95, died Monday, June 22. Mr. de Pasquale, of Merion, was principal violist of two of America's golden-age ensembles - the Boston Symphony Orchestra from 1947 to 1964, and then, sitting alongside three of his brothers, the Philadelphia Orchestra from 1964 until retirement in 1996. He is credited with raising the standard of viola playing so dramatically that it remade the instrument's image, said Curtis Institute of Music president Roberto Díaz, a one-time de Pasquale protégé.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
WASHINGTON - Derogatory jokes about the viola are probably waiting to be made over the fact that Jennifer Higdon's concerto for that instrument sat for five years on a waiting list before arriving at its premiere Saturday at the Library of Congress. In truth, the Philadelphia composer was keen to give the ordinarily brooding instrument a levity other viola concertos lack, but first she had to finish her opera Cold Mountain . The concerto, written for violist and Curtis Institute president Roberto Diaz and the Curtis Chamber Orchestra, is ultimately concerned with getting down to essentials, yielding distinctive, under-the-surface strength.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Steve Jobs said that the "i" in all the Apple products' names stood for "Internet, individual, instruct, inform, inspire. " And although the products are patented, the use of "i" is not, and Philly Shakes' solo show, iHamlet , an adaptation by Robin Malan, seems to mean the "i" literally as "I" since the show is made up of Hamlet's lines extracted from the play and strung together. Hamlet as narcissist. And a female narcissist to boot. The set is a chair and gigantic mirror into which Melissa Dunphy gazes.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Leonard Bogdanoff, 83, of Elkins Park, a violist with the Philadelphia Orchestra for a half-century, died Friday, March 15, at his home. Colleagues said Mr. Bogdanoff personified the best qualities of the orchestra's old guard. "When I think of Leonard, I think of the kindness in dealing with all of the other members of the viola section. He was just very fair," said Pamela Faye, a substitute violist with the orchestra and a frequent stand partner of Mr. Bogdanoff's. "You can have people who can make or break a section, and he was one of the ones who gave a positive influence, sound-wise, stylistically, all of it. That was really an inspiration to me. " Retired orchestra member Louis Lanza, who as a second violinist sat not far from Mr. Bogdanoff, called him "a very steady player, very accurate, and just a wonderful musician.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
GET EXCITED, "Scandal" fans. Shonda Rhimes , the creator of ABC's most tweet-worthy show, is bringing her next creation to Philadelphia. And to make matters even better, it's set to star Oscar-nominated goddess of the big screen Viola Davis . The two will work together on "How to Get Away with Murder," a pilot for ABC that will be filmed in Philadelphia. Davis will play a deeply mysterious law school professor who gets caught up in a murder that shakes her life - and the lives of her students - to the core.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Philadelphia Orchestra presents the interactive music program "Sound All Around," for ages 3 to 5, at the Academy of Music on Saturday and Monday. The interactive program introduces audience members to the viola. Assistant principal viola Kerri Ryan and master storyteller Charlotte Blake Alston will guide kids on a learning musical journey. Kids can hear stories along with music and sing while pretending to play the string instrument. They can get a close look at the viola, nurturing their fascination and curiosity.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Quick: What do you think when you see the title of Curio Theatre's world premiere Gender Comedy: A Less Stupid Twelfth Night Gay Fantasia ? Whatever you picture - drag, slapstick, high camp - you're right. But for Philly-bred first-time playwright and Curio company member Harry Slack, though this isn't exactly a bait-and-switch scheme, it's certainly akin to catch-and-release, complete with profound existential reckoning. (There's a mid-show "fish fight"; it's an apt analogy.) Shakespeare's cross-dressing comedy is having a reinvention moment right now, and not just because it's Christmastime.
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