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NEWS
April 25, 2008
IF PEOPLE put as much effort into stopping violence on the streets of Philadelphia as they do into things like arguing over politics and minding celebrity lifestyles, the city would be on its way to peaceful living. As a public high-school student, every day I wonder if I'll make it safely through the day. Jennifer Smith, Philadelphia
NEWS
September 7, 2006
Even as two faces now gaze out from a wall of Benjamin Franklin High School, last-minute work needs to be done for the All Join Hands: Visions of Peace project. On Saturday, you have one last chance to join this antiviolence project. About a year has passed since residents from throughout the region began work on the mural. It is rising on the long wall of the school, located at Broad and Spring Garden Streets. The mural's mission: to remind its viewers of the high cost of violence and the high hopes for a safer future.
NEWS
December 22, 1990
It should come as no surprise, but a study of young children has confirmed that physical abuse at home is more strongly linked to later aggressive behavior than such factors as poverty, divorce or marital violence. In other words, as often as not, violent people learned to be that way because as kids, they were the victims of violence. Sparing the rod needn't spoil the child if effective alternative discipline is applied, and it could help a kid develop into an adult who doesn't misbehave.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1995 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Intensity is the order of the day. The top three new movies on video this week offer both intense drama and intense comedy. NATURAL BORN KILLERS 1/2 (1994) (Warner) 119 minutes. Woody Harrelson, Juliette Lewis, Robert Downey Jr., Tommy Lee Jones. Love it or hate it, you have to see director Oliver Stone's sort-of satire about violence and the media and how they have blood-soaked our culture. This trippy tale of gun- crazy lovers on the lam is like channel-surfing through hell - and every station has a laugh track.
NEWS
October 17, 1994 | ANDREA MIHALIK / DAILY NEWS
Children carry lighted candles during a procession yesterday at St. Carthage Roman Catholic Church, 63rd Street and Cedar Avenue, to honor 54 children killed by violence last year. The observance marks the beginning of the third annual Children's Sabbath, a month-long interfaith observance across the nation, aimed at raising awareness of the extent of violence in children's lives.
NEWS
July 31, 1987 | Los Angeles Daily News
The trouble on California roadways escalated yesterday with two law officers becoming targets of random violence, which included a new round of shootings, rock-throwing and at least two reports of motorists pointing guns at cars. The latest round of violence came despite stepped-up patrols of freeways by officers from all 48 municipal police departments within Los Angeles County.
NEWS
December 7, 1994 | BY SYLVESTER F. HENRY JR
We all are saddened when we hear of a child murdered or victimized by violence. We are even more saddened when the perpetrators are also children. We ask ourselves, why are the children of today so violent? People blame the inner city, or poverty, or a single-parent household, or lack of a male role model or the easy access to guns. But that doesn't explain why violence affects suburban communities where both parents are present and the poverty does not exist. The primary factor is the attitude of adults toward violence.
NEWS
July 23, 1986
There's something wrong with people who consider pornography, even as mild as Playboy, to be more conducive to violence than movies on television today. Even children can watch acts of violence any time of day. I doubt that reasonably sane adults well past their formative years will be brainwashed into committing sex crimes after prolonged exposure to sexually explicit material. After all, members of the Meese commission viewed a lot of pornography before releasing their report.
NEWS
January 8, 1993 | SUSAN WINTERS/ DAILY NEWS
Simon Gratz High student Brian Samuels listens to Temple basketball coach John Chaney at a school assembly yesterday. Chaney and other local figures, such as former Eagle Mike Quick, school board president Rotan Lee, Cheyney basketball coach Keith Johnson and Wilmington, Del., Councilman Ted Blunt, came as part of Project PAVE, a program founded by community sports figure Sonny Hill and Schools Superintendent Dr. Constance Clayton to address growing...
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NEWS
February 21, 2015 | Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter said Thursday that his successor must understand the importance of preventing youth violence if Philadelphia is to thrive. "You know what year it is," he told a room crowded with educators, politicians, and youth outreach groups on Temple University's campus. "I will go. But the work, the effort, and the impact, must continue. Whoever comes next must understand how critically important, how critically vital, how impactful this work is. " The city has made some important progress, he noted: homicides are down, employment is up, and development is booming.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | BY BOB STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer stewarr@phillynews.com 215-854-4890
YOUTH VIOLENCE is a disease and it spreads like a virus, Mayor Nutter told about 75 people at a Temple University conference yesterday. Attendees included activists, educators and members of the mayor's Youth Violence Prevention Collaborative. "Violence is a public-health crisis," Nutter said. "It is a disease. We know how to treat disease. " Nutter cited a $1.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Justice to the city and Temple to set up Ceasefire Philly, an offshoot of a Chicago-based group that uses methods and strategies similar to disease control to stop violence in communities.
NEWS
January 27, 2015
ON JAN. 16, as I was riding down Market Street, I witnessed a boy lying in the street with a bike close to his body. I thought he was maybe riding the bike and had just been hit by a car. I was just speculating about what happened because I didn't see a car anywhere in sight. SEPTA and Philadelphia police were just then arriving at the scene. He appeared to not be breathing. I could see them performing CPR on him. The incident started to draw a crowd, and I said a prayer and continued on my journey.
NEWS
January 20, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writerzalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
EVERY TIME she closes her eyes, Jamellia O'Neal sees the face of her 14-year-old nephew, Nafis O'Neal - his wide, handsome smile that could light up a room, caught somewhere between boyhood and manhood. And because of a spat among high schoolers and a 16-year-old boy who couldn't let it go without resorting to violence, that's the way Jamellia O'Neal and the rest of Nafis' family will remember the West Philadelphia High School freshman. Nafis, a standout football and basketball player who loved to ride his bike and spend time with his little brother, was murdered after school Friday when a schoolmate allegedly plunged a knife through his young heart during an argument at 46th and Market streets, police say. Monday night, O'Neal joined about 200 people on the sidewalk where Nafis took his last breaths to say prayers, light candles and release blue and white balloons in memory of the teen, who O'Neal said strove to emulate his father, an Ironworker, and was the middle child of five siblings in a tight-knit family.
NEWS
January 19, 2015
T. MILTON STREET SR.'S fighting spirit has not died, and neither has his desire to be mayor. The former state senator, 75, says he's poised to announce another run at the city's top job. Street garnered 36,000 votes in the 2011 Democratic primary. That's a not-too-shabby tally for a guy who served time in federal prison in 2008 for three misdemeanor counts of tax evasion. Street, the brother of former Mayor John Street, says he'll once again run on a platform to fight violence and empower the city's poor and downtrodden - those disregarded as "throw-aways.
NEWS
December 31, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
"YOU COULD get hurt being out here, because there are a lot of weirdos out there. " Robert Palen allegedly gave that warning to a woman he approached on a late-summer night in 2010. Not long after Palen offered that advice, the woman later told police, he allegedly raped her on a park bench in a secluded area. Judging by his criminal record, Palen knows a lot about hurting women. Palen, 38, was hauled back to Philly on Dec. 26 after rotting in a Wisconsin prison for more than a year, police sources told the Daily News last night.
NEWS
December 17, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
WHATEVER REASON we eventually settle on for the latest deadly shooting spree, this time in Montgomery County yesterday - mental illness, easy access to guns, a world gone mad - we know one thing for sure: A gun shattered families, a community and our sense of safety. A gun. Again. Just hours after the second anniversary of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings in Newtown, Conn., that left 26 people dead, including 20 children, and in the midst of a siege in Sydney, Australia, that eventually ended with three dead, including the assailant, another shooting spree unfolded closer to home.
NEWS
November 27, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The predicted violent reaction to a grand jury's decision not to charge a Missouri police officer in the Aug. 9 fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager must be seen in its broader context. While many of the rioters Monday in Ferguson, Mo., used the grand jury decision as an excuse to loot and burn, others wrongly chose violence to vent their frustration not only with the exoneration of Officer Darren Wilson, but with a justice system they believe treats African Americans unfairly.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | By Helen Ubiñas, Daily News Columnist
I UNDERSTAND, and support, the thousands of people across the nation who are showing their solidarity with Ferguson after a grand jury decided not to indict the police officer who killed Michael Brown. What I don't understand is why we don't show the same kind of sorrow and support to people in Philadelphia whose lives are also being torn apart by violence. Why we don't take to the streets for children being terrorized and traumatized by a daily dose of fear and chaos right in our own back yards.
NEWS
November 20, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
You'll know Philadelphia CeaseFire's newest tool to combat gun violence when you see it. A converted 33-foot 1995 Winnebago branded with the words "Stop. Shooting. People. " doesn't exactly blend in. And that's the point. "This tool gives us a constant opportunity to show residents and those just driving by that we're really out here, on the streets, working toward a reduction in youth violence," said program director Marla Davis Bellamy. Bellamy spoke Tuesday outside Temple University's Student Faculty Center at 3300 N. Broad St., moments after the ribbon was cut on the mobile office by State Sen. Shirley Kitchen and Philadelphia City Council President Darrell L. Clarke.
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