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NEWS
April 25, 2008
IF PEOPLE put as much effort into stopping violence on the streets of Philadelphia as they do into things like arguing over politics and minding celebrity lifestyles, the city would be on its way to peaceful living. As a public high-school student, every day I wonder if I'll make it safely through the day. Jennifer Smith, Philadelphia
NEWS
September 7, 2006
Even as two faces now gaze out from a wall of Benjamin Franklin High School, last-minute work needs to be done for the All Join Hands: Visions of Peace project. On Saturday, you have one last chance to join this antiviolence project. About a year has passed since residents from throughout the region began work on the mural. It is rising on the long wall of the school, located at Broad and Spring Garden Streets. The mural's mission: to remind its viewers of the high cost of violence and the high hopes for a safer future.
NEWS
December 22, 1990
It should come as no surprise, but a study of young children has confirmed that physical abuse at home is more strongly linked to later aggressive behavior than such factors as poverty, divorce or marital violence. In other words, as often as not, violent people learned to be that way because as kids, they were the victims of violence. Sparing the rod needn't spoil the child if effective alternative discipline is applied, and it could help a kid develop into an adult who doesn't misbehave.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1995 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Intensity is the order of the day. The top three new movies on video this week offer both intense drama and intense comedy. NATURAL BORN KILLERS 1/2 (1994) (Warner) 119 minutes. Woody Harrelson, Juliette Lewis, Robert Downey Jr., Tommy Lee Jones. Love it or hate it, you have to see director Oliver Stone's sort-of satire about violence and the media and how they have blood-soaked our culture. This trippy tale of gun- crazy lovers on the lam is like channel-surfing through hell - and every station has a laugh track.
NEWS
October 17, 1994 | ANDREA MIHALIK / DAILY NEWS
Children carry lighted candles during a procession yesterday at St. Carthage Roman Catholic Church, 63rd Street and Cedar Avenue, to honor 54 children killed by violence last year. The observance marks the beginning of the third annual Children's Sabbath, a month-long interfaith observance across the nation, aimed at raising awareness of the extent of violence in children's lives.
NEWS
July 31, 1987 | Los Angeles Daily News
The trouble on California roadways escalated yesterday with two law officers becoming targets of random violence, which included a new round of shootings, rock-throwing and at least two reports of motorists pointing guns at cars. The latest round of violence came despite stepped-up patrols of freeways by officers from all 48 municipal police departments within Los Angeles County.
NEWS
December 7, 1994 | BY SYLVESTER F. HENRY JR
We all are saddened when we hear of a child murdered or victimized by violence. We are even more saddened when the perpetrators are also children. We ask ourselves, why are the children of today so violent? People blame the inner city, or poverty, or a single-parent household, or lack of a male role model or the easy access to guns. But that doesn't explain why violence affects suburban communities where both parents are present and the poverty does not exist. The primary factor is the attitude of adults toward violence.
NEWS
July 23, 1986
There's something wrong with people who consider pornography, even as mild as Playboy, to be more conducive to violence than movies on television today. Even children can watch acts of violence any time of day. I doubt that reasonably sane adults well past their formative years will be brainwashed into committing sex crimes after prolonged exposure to sexually explicit material. After all, members of the Meese commission viewed a lot of pornography before releasing their report.
NEWS
January 8, 1993 | SUSAN WINTERS/ DAILY NEWS
Simon Gratz High student Brian Samuels listens to Temple basketball coach John Chaney at a school assembly yesterday. Chaney and other local figures, such as former Eagle Mike Quick, school board president Rotan Lee, Cheyney basketball coach Keith Johnson and Wilmington, Del., Councilman Ted Blunt, came as part of Project PAVE, a program founded by community sports figure Sonny Hill and Schools Superintendent Dr. Constance Clayton to address growing...
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 26, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
Last fall, the youth development organization Hopeworks 'N Camden hosted its first-ever hack-athon, an event aimed at using technology to find solutions to the city's economic problems. The hack-athon, sponsored by companies that included Subaru of America and Starbucks, hosted 96 young men and women, plus 20 from Hopeworks, as well as 14 developers from various companies. The event has led to a growing relationship between Hopeworks, which provides young Camden residents with high-tech job training, and Subaru, which has since offered company tours and information technology workshops to aspiring Web developers, said Hopeworks executive director Dan Rhoton.
NEWS
January 17, 2016
By Paola Antonelli and Jamer Hunt, with Michelle Millar Fisher MoMA. 232 pp., $45 Reviewed by Carolina A. Miranda A common saying among designers is that "design won't save the world. " The objects in Design and Violence make the case that we may be designing our way to destruction. In December, when Syed Rizwan Farook and Tashfeen Malik killed 14 people at a holiday office party in San Bernardino, Calif., they were armed with a veritable arsenal: a Smith & Wesson M&P 15 assault rifle, a DPMS Panther Arms assault rifle, a Springfield Armory 9mm handgun, and a Llama 9mm handgun.
NEWS
January 15, 2016
The year is 2016. The scene: a street in West Philadelphia. A local physician is in his car, stopped at a traffic light, when a man with a gun rushes out and begins firing at the car. Miraculously, the doctor is not killed, but he does suffer serious bullet wounds to his left arm and leg. The assailant runs down the street, then tackled by an alert town watch member, who manages to subdue him and call the police. Later, at a news conference, police officials identify the physician at a staff member at a local nonprofit clinic that performs abortions.
NEWS
January 6, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Staff Writer
Pledging to address violence and improve low-achieving schools, State Rep. Thaddeus Kirkland was sworn in Monday as mayor of Chester, one of the region's poorest and most crime-ridden cities. For now, the Democrat said, he will wear two hats - serving as mayor and in the House. Kirkland has rescinded his resignation of his House seat, and said he would remain in the legislature until a budget is passed or until the end of February. He will draw only his state salary, he said. "I am deeply humbled," said the 23-year House veteran, who broke down after taking the oath.
NEWS
December 24, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, STAFF WRITER
Amid a slew of social media posts and rampant rumors about out-of-control fighting and violence in two schools, Coatesville Area School District officials say they are beefing up security, adding private guards, and planning a walk-through with local law enforcement to scope out any trouble spots. The tighter safety measures come as officials in the Chester County district continue to insist that fighting at the 9/10 Center - the school for high school freshmen and sophomores - is no worse than in previous years.
NEWS
December 23, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA & JASON NARK, Staff Writers
WILMINGTON - Everyone who shuffled in and out of Peoples Market at 7th and Washington streets carried a memory: cold, grim details about gunshots, fatherless children, memorials. They shouted them into the rain and cigarette smoke on the corner, a brief testament to this city's ongoing violence. Their common threads were the sons, cousins, friends and daughters they'd known and lost, all shot dead here, blocks away or just a few feet from where they stood, casualties of a small city struggling with a big problem in the first state to ratify the Constitution.
NEWS
December 9, 2015
IN HER RECENT column, Christine Flowers writes, "I reject the premise that language, even harsh language, can trigger havoc. Words don't kill. Sick, evil people do. " Therefore, she claims, the inflammatory language of the anti-abortion movement has nothing to do with the violent attacks against abortion providers. Ms. Flowers also indicates that she is an "unapologetic Christian. " She should remember, then, the flyers that were circulated in El Salvador in the '70s and '80s instructing soldiers to "Be a patriot!
NEWS
December 8, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Staff Writer
New research from Penn Medicine suggests that environmental predictors and behavioral choices - where you go and how you get there - can mitigate or increase the risks of exposure to violence by gunfire and other weapons. Penn researchers interviewed 10- to 24-year-old males, primarily African Americans - just after they were treated for gunshot wounds or other injuries from violence - at the emergency trauma centers of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 7, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
After finishing her shift Tuesday evening at Farm Fresh Produce in Drexel Hill, Joyce Crocker took the subway back to South Philadelphia, where she lives and where Mayor-elect Jim Kenney was holding a town-hall meeting. Crocker moved to South Philadelphia's Whitman neighborhood two years ago, and has already seen the effect that street violence and unresponsive city services can have on a residential block. She wanted to tell the mayor-to-be about the issues on the 2500 block of South Reese Street, where she lives, in the hope that something will be done when he gets into office.
NEWS
December 4, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia police have collected about 700 used cellphones to distribute to domestic violence victims as part of a yearly drive supporting women's shelters in the city. Now in its 12th year, the program encourages Philadelphians to donate their used cellphones at Fraternal Order of Police lodges and at all 21 police districts around the city. The phones are collected and sent to Verizon's Hopeline program, which refurbishes them and distributes them to anti-domestic violence agencies all over the country.
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