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Violence

NEWS
May 5, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Local government cannot by itself fix problems of violence and unemployment like those brought to light in last week's Baltimore protests, Mayor Nutter said Sunday. Government, philanthropies, and corporations must cooperate to provide education and create employment for struggling inner-city residents, particularly in communities of color, to improve conditions in America, he said. Nutter appeared on the CNN talk show State of the Union with William A. Bell, mayor of Birmingham, Ala.; and U.S. Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D., Md.)
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Aubrey Whelan, and Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Hundreds of demonstrators surged through Center City on Thursday evening to angrily denounce police violence, at one point surrounding a squad car, and later grappling in a tense push-and-shove that saw officers ready their batons. Despite the tumult, noise, and moments of high tension - including a rush to reach and take over the Vine Street Expressway - nothing was broken and no one was seriously hurt. Police said they made three or four arrests; two of those arrested were released several hours later, to the cheers of some in the crowd.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
SARAH-ASHLEY Andrews spread peace yesterday in the form of water bottles and Tastykake Krimpets. She, along with about a dozen volunteers, staged a "takeover" of the corner of 15th and Market streets, handing out the complimentary refreshments to passers-by as they ducked into the nearby SEPTA concourse. "We want to promote peace, to show these people positive role models," said Andrews, the founder of Dare 2 Hope, a grass-roots organization that promotes suicide prevention and awareness.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
* OUTLANDER. 9 p.m. Saturday, Starz. MORE THAN six months after Starz's "Outlander" left its time-traveling heroine the half-naked (and very much afraid) prisoner of a sadist, the series returns Saturday to find Claire (Caitriona Balfe) right where it left her. And some of you thought "Droughtlander" was long? "We shot that over two days. That was very intense," Balfe said, in an interview, of the scene with Tobias Menzies that bridges the two halves of the show's first season.
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
QUAHMIER WILSON blew out 10 candles on his birthday cake yesterday. He did so surrounded by family - both his blood relatives and dozens of the 6,300 men and women in the Philadelphia Police Department who have committed themselves to supporting him and his 1-year-old brother. "He was happy; he kept a straight face," Tremaine Ward, a cousin of Quahmier's father, Officer Robert Wilson III, said last night. "Everybody is trying to keep him distracted, to give him something to smile about," he added.
NEWS
March 6, 2015
IF HE was alive today, William Shakespeare could conceivably be an in-demand writer of action movies. After all, so many of his most-famous works include a heaping helping of violence, much of it in the form of sword fights. For instance, there's "Macbeth," which was scheduled to open last night at Old City's Arden Theatre Co. (it runs through April 19). "The Scottish Play," as generations of superstitious thespians have referred to it, is one of Shakespeare's monumental works - a timeless tale of maternal manipulation and back-stairs skullduggery.
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter said Thursday that his successor must understand the importance of preventing youth violence if Philadelphia is to thrive. "You know what year it is," he told a room crowded with educators, politicians, and youth outreach groups on Temple University's campus. "I will go. But the work, the effort, and the impact, must continue. Whoever comes next must understand how critically important, how critically vital, how impactful this work is. " The city has made some important progress, he noted: homicides are down, employment is up, and development is booming.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | BY BOB STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer stewarr@phillynews.com 215-854-4890
YOUTH VIOLENCE is a disease and it spreads like a virus, Mayor Nutter told about 75 people at a Temple University conference yesterday. Attendees included activists, educators and members of the mayor's Youth Violence Prevention Collaborative. "Violence is a public-health crisis," Nutter said. "It is a disease. We know how to treat disease. " Nutter cited a $1.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Justice to the city and Temple to set up Ceasefire Philly, an offshoot of a Chicago-based group that uses methods and strategies similar to disease control to stop violence in communities.
NEWS
January 27, 2015
ON JAN. 16, as I was riding down Market Street, I witnessed a boy lying in the street with a bike close to his body. I thought he was maybe riding the bike and had just been hit by a car. I was just speculating about what happened because I didn't see a car anywhere in sight. SEPTA and Philadelphia police were just then arriving at the scene. He appeared to not be breathing. I could see them performing CPR on him. The incident started to draw a crowd, and I said a prayer and continued on my journey.
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