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NEWS
June 15, 2016
By Sally Friedman On Sunday, in my usual morning stupor, I shuffled into the kitchen, turned on the coffee, flipped on the TV, and heard something ominous about a mass shooting. My instant thought was that our 19-year-old grandson was in Israel, thousands of miles from his Merion home, and that this might have something to do with him. Israel is a country where too much unrest explodes too frequently. "Dear God, let him be fine!" I begged, my heart beating wildly. And then I began hearing the details.
NEWS
June 14, 2016
I WOKE UP, like everyone else, to tragedy Sunday morning. We use that word reflexively when something involving guns and innocent people and specific "phobias" are involved. There's no other word, although the media might call it "breaking news" and "ratings bonanza. " Five minutes into my bleary-eyed view of the CNN reports, I already saw how this would go. First, there would be a wringing of hands about guns. Then, or perhaps even simultaneously, there would be attempts to identify a motive.
NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
I'M TRYING hard not to be cynical about National Gun Violence Awareness Day, June 2. To mark the occasion, people are encouraged to #WearOrange. It actually has an inspiring backstory, according to the press surrounding the campaign. In 2013, some friends of Hadiya Pendleton, a South Side Chicago student who was murdered, asked classmates to honor her by wearing orange. The students inspired the Wear Orange campaign (wearorange.org), working to reduce gun violence in the U.S. Obviously a work in progress.
NEWS
May 29, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, STAFF WRITER
NEWARK, Del. - It wasn't real blood that spattered on the shoes of a girl in the front row, but some of the kids shrieked a little anyway. Shrieked, and giggled a bit, too. But not for long. "Get that tube in!" a doctor shouted. "He's losing a lot of blood!" Leaning forward in their seats, students from George Read Middle School in New Castle, Del., craned their necks for a better look. This was a simulated emergency performed by staff at Christiana Hospital, but the youngsters knew it was based on the story of a real gunshot victim.
NEWS
May 27, 2016
OUR NEIGHBORHOODS, our front porches, are staring down the barrel of a gun. Memorial Day weekend approaches, and so does the warm weather that usually brings increased gun violence. By Thursday afternoon, Philadelphia had clocked 445 shootings, 24 percent higher than the 358 recorded this time last year. How do you prepare when escape is not an option? How do you carry on when you can see the chaos coming straight at you and your loved ones? "Let's take a walk," Denise Carey says when I stop by the West Mill Creek Recreation Center in West Philly.
NEWS
May 8, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
Authorities are searching for the gunman who killed a Camden man Thursday in front of his family outside a funeral home as his grandmother's memorial service was taking place. Witnesses told police that a man walked up to Jonathan Vazquez, 22, about 6:30 p.m. and fired at him multiple times, setting off chaos in front of the May Funeral Home on South Fourth Street in the city's Bergen Square section. Police found people screaming and crying, and Vazquez bleeding on the ground. He was pronounced dead at Cooper University Hospital minutes later.
NEWS
April 27, 2016
By Adam Bates It's important to understand the problem and its history. Between 10,000 and 12,000 people are killed in gun crimes each year in the United States. That figure is at once unacceptably high and historically low. The U.S. murder rate remains too high, but the public seems largely unaware that the murder rate has been falling steadily for decades. The murder rate in 2014 was half what it was in 1994. So we're doing something right, and there is little evidence that stricter gun laws are responsible.
NEWS
April 27, 2016
By Chelsea Parsons I propose to start this conversation with a few key facts: 33,000 people are killed with guns in the United States every year. An additional 84,000 suffer nonfatal gunshot injuries. Compared with their respective peers in other high-income countries, women in America are 11 times more likely to be murdered with a gun, and children in the United States are 16 times more likely to be killed in an unintentional shooting. Communities of color are hit particularly hard by gun violence: African American men make up more than half of all gun murder victims in this country.
NEWS
April 22, 2016
By Jonathan Blanks Police play a unique role in the community. They possess the awesome power to use violence against an individual to maintain public peace and safety. How police use that power - and how some officers sometimes abuse it - is in the public interest to know. But the Pennsylvania legislature might make it harder to track incidents of potential abuse by officers and, in doing so, may undermine the public's trust in the police who serve it. In November, the Pennsylvania House of Representatives overwhelmingly approved House Bill 1538, which would prevent government officials from releasing the names of officers under investigation for on-duty shootings or uses of force that do not result in criminal charges against the officers.
NEWS
April 19, 2016
Anti-gun-violence group backs Sestak The three Democratic candidates for U.S. Senate from Pennsylvania - Katie McGinty, John Fetterman, and Joe Sestak - have similar positions on gun safety and violence prevention, but the Chester County Coalition to Prevent Gun Violence feels that Sestak has the edge in experience and ability to win the general election. As a former Navy admiral, Sestak understands firearms and their dangers. In his two terms in the U.S. House of Representatives, he supported four gun bills, including the assault weapons ban. And he was instrumental in closing a pawn shop in the Seventh Congressional District that did not follow safe practices in reselling used guns.
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