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Violent Crime

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NEWS
January 30, 2009 | By Maya Rao INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While wearing a locator bracelet as a condition of his parole, Burlington City resident Ronald "Bang Boy" Kinston allegedly ran a gun- and heroin-distribution ring as a leader of the Bounty Hunter Bloods gang. He was arrested in August when authorities discovered in a car four semiautomatic handguns that were being delivered to him from North Carolina. Law-enforcement officials say they then seized more than 300 "decks" of heroin, distribution paraphernalia, cash, and hollow-point ammunition from Kinston's house.
NEWS
February 2, 2009 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Violent crime went down 3 percent overall in Philadelphia last year, but results varied significantly among the 23 police districts. The Ninth District, including the western part of Center City and Fairmount, reported the greatest reduction: 27 percent. The 16th District, in West Philadelphia, and the Fifth District, in Manayunk and Roxborough, reported decreases of 15 percent or more. The Third District, in South Philadelphia and southeastern Center City, and the Seventh District, in the Northeast, reported the largest increases in violent crime: 12 percent.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Michael Hinkelman and Daily News Staff Writer
THE ANNUAL COST of violent crime in Philadelphia averages more than $472 per person, or a total of $736 million in 2010 alone. That's just one eye-popping conclusion of a new study examining costs associated with violent crime. The yearlong study by the Center for American Progress that was released Tuesday analyzed the direct and intangible costs associated with murders, robberies, assaults and rapes in eight U.S. cities, including Philadelphia. Direct costs are those borne by residents and city governments for increased spending on policing, prosecuting and incarcerating violent offenders; and by the victims of violent crime in medical expenses and lost income; as well as foregone tax revenue to cities.
NEWS
December 29, 2010 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The dealer and his lookout were peddling crack on a Camden side street. It was midnight in Whitman Park, a desperate neighborhood in a desperate city. An undercover officer made a buy. Camden Police Lt. Greg Carlin's radio crackled: "Move in, move in. " When the unmarked cars raced up, the dealer, a big guy in black, froze in the headlights. His lookout took off. Carlin hit the gas down a one-way. Other officers ran after the lookout, darting across an intersection. Carlin and another officer bore down on the fleeing suspect, tackling him before he made it into a patchwork of yards.
NEWS
September 2, 1987 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. George Charles Hoeh was a dynamic and well-loved Episcopal priest, a self-made millionaire and a thoroughly exuberant member of the human race. Even the detective investigating his murder remarked, "I haven't talked to anybody who didn't like him. " In his priestly life, Father Hoeh walked among the flock of his small, secure neighborhood parish in Brooklyn and served as confessor, comforter and social conscience. But he walked more dangerous paths in private life - on those frequent occasions when he abandoned Brooklyn for the relaxation of his commodious retreat in the affluent Sweetwater section of Mullica Township, N.J. It was there, on a Friday in June last year, that Father Hoeh, 58, carelessly invited home a stranger, a young man who called himself Paul and said he was from Minnesota.
NEWS
January 6, 2010 | By DAVID GAMBACORTA, gambacd@phillynews.com 215-854-5994
There was a time - say, three years ago - when Philadelphia was "Killadelphia," and many people seemed to think the city was about as safe a place to walk around as a lion's den at feeding time. While acknowledging that the city is still far from a utopia, Mayor Nutter, Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey and other officials joined yesterday to laud a 10 percent across-the-board drop in violent crime in 2009. Oversized color charts, situated inside North Philadelphia's 22nd District's roll-call room, bore the fruits of a year of progress: Homicides fell 8.4 percent, from 333 in 2008 to 305 last year; aggravated assaults fell 10.2 percent from 9,350 to 8,398; rapes dropped 13.2 percent, from 1,105 to 957, and robberies were down 6.5 percent, 9,343 to 8,738.
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | By Sergio R. Bustos, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sun was going down two evenings ago as Art Benica described to a gathering how a young woman was slain last year while working as a night clerk at a motel in Virginia Beach, Va. He told how the woman had screamed, begging two robbers not to hurt her. He told how the two thugs took $230 from the cash register and then discussed who would kill her. The woman killed by a shot to the back of the head was Benica's sister-in- law, Julia Benica....
NEWS
January 7, 2015 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writer rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
PHILADELPHIA ended the year with 248 murders, just one higher than in 2013, when the city saw a historic low of 247, according to crime statistics touted yesterday by Mayor Nutter. Nutter noted that the 2014 murder total represented a nearly 37 percent drop from 2007, the year before he took office, when 391 were slain. The mayor credited the decrease in murders - and a decline in shootings and violent crime overall - to the leadership of Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey, the diligence of his officers and a collaboration between police and community activists to fight crime.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | By Dwight Ott, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Previte gets angry when she thinks about it. "I watched this little 14-year-old charged with murder bobbing for apples with the other juveniles," said Previte, superintendent of the Camden County Youth Center in Blackwood. "He slurped up the activities like a 9-year-old, as though he had never done anything like this before. "I watched him bob nine times to compete with the other kids, and I watched him compete so hard at musical chairs. I said to myself, 'Who did this to this child?
NEWS
May 11, 2007
Several of you have ambitious, long-term plans to address the root causes of violent crime, which citizens cite as the top issue of this campaign. But tell us what you'd do in your first year as mayor to make sure there is less violent crime in Philadelphia in 2008 than in 2007. Bob Brady Cutting crime in Philadelphia will be my top priority as mayor. During my first term, I will put 1,000 additional police, parole and parent truancy officers on the streets. I will work with the Philadelphia police, who have endorsed me, to put more officers in the neighborhoods and reengage neighborhood policing.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 20, 2016
Exactly one year ago, I was assaulted in my neighborhood. It's not the sort of anniversary you want to celebrate, but one you can't help but remember. During the attack, I believed the stranger could kill me. Thankfully, I escaped only badly beaten and robbed. My assailant was never caught. In the months following, I dealt with some of the typical post-traumatic psychological issues. But my most lingering fear wasn't that I would be attacked again. I was afraid of becoming a different person.
NEWS
May 8, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
Authorities are searching for the gunman who killed a Camden man Thursday in front of his family outside a funeral home as his grandmother's memorial service was taking place. Witnesses told police that a man walked up to Jonathan Vazquez, 22, about 6:30 p.m. and fired at him multiple times, setting off chaos in front of the May Funeral Home on South Fourth Street in the city's Bergen Square section. Police found people screaming and crying, and Vazquez bleeding on the ground. He was pronounced dead at Cooper University Hospital minutes later.
NEWS
May 1, 2016 | By Allison Steele, STAFF WRITER
Community leaders in Camden are holding a rally for peace Saturday morning at 11 a.m. in response to a recent surge in violent crime. The rally starts at the Camden County police building, at 800 Federal Street, and the group will walk to City Hall. Several people are expected to speak about their personal experiences with violence, including Camden's Taisha Mercado, whose 13-year-old son Nathaniel Plummer was shot and killed in January. A 17-year-old girl has been charged in his murder.
NEWS
February 19, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
During the spring mayoral campaign, Jim Kenney seemed anything but equivocal about stop-and-frisk searches. "If [I'm] mayor, stop and frisk will end in Philadelphia, no question," Kenney said last April. This week, after the release of a transition report that recommended reforming the use of stop and frisk, his administration gave a more nuanced explanation. Kenney said pedestrian stops must continue but less aggressively than under the Nutter administration and with more attention to legal constraints.
NEWS
January 13, 2016 | By David Gambacorta, Staff Writer
Well, so much for fishing trips and relaxing at the beach. Wilmington Mayor Dennis Williams announced Monday that former Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey has been hired as a public safety consultant. Williams' spokeswoman, Alexandra Coppadge, said Ramsey's contract will last for seven months, and pay him up to $16,000 a month. Ramsey will meet regularly with Wilmington Police Chief Bobby Cummings, and work "hands on with the police department on a weekly basis," Coppadge said.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey couldn't stand the thought of burying another one of his own. It was March, and he had long been thinking of retirement, ever since Mayor Nutter had won reelection. Even then, he had been "95 percent sure. " His career was at an apex - there had been presidential appointments, and prominent positions on national policing boards, and an unprecedented drop in homicides in a city once dubbed "Killadelphia. " And now he was eulogizing Sgt. Robert Wilson III, gunned down in a robbery gone wrong, the eighth officer he had laid to rest.
NEWS
August 8, 2015 | By Mark Fazlollah and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
Arrests by Philadelphia police dropped by 16 percent during the first half of 2015, the biggest plunge in six years, records show. And during the same period, all crime - including violent felonies, misdemeanors, and property offenses - increased by 5 percent, according to the latest data posted on the Police Department's website. Through June, police recorded 5,661 fewer arrests than they did in the first half of last year. Police made 34,786 arrests during the first six months of 2014; this year, 29,125.
NEWS
August 5, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
YOU COULD BE forgiven for thinking Philadelphia's biggest problems have been limited recently to pope fences, a dismembered traveling robot and Chip Kelly's roster moves. Violent-crime numbers - a quality-of-life measurement temporarily forgotten in the basement of the city's consciousness - have been climbing. As of Sunday night, 152 murders had been recorded - a 5 percent increase from the same point last year, when the tally stood at 141, according to police statistics. The number of Philadelphians who have been shot has risen 9 percent, hovering at 627 victims as of last Monday, compared to 572 at the same time last year.
NEWS
July 21, 2015 | Chris Brennan, Inquirer Columnist
Melissa Murray Bailey, the Republican nominee for mayor of Philadelphia, was running a low-key campaign in a sleepy race. That all changed two weeks ago when Bailey began staking out positions on issues, including some with a national profile. Drawing national attention could help Bailey's campaign, which as of last month had raised less than $10,000, in the race against Democratic nominee Jim Kenney, who had more than 12 times that much campaign cash in the bank as of June 8. Bailey, in one of her campaign's first official statements, said she would not continue Philadelphia's status as a so-called Sanctuary City if she won. "Providing a safe harbor in Philadelphia for illegal immigrants who commit violent crimes is the wrong choice," Bailey said.
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