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Violent Crime

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NEWS
January 30, 2009 | By Maya Rao INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While wearing a locator bracelet as a condition of his parole, Burlington City resident Ronald "Bang Boy" Kinston allegedly ran a gun- and heroin-distribution ring as a leader of the Bounty Hunter Bloods gang. He was arrested in August when authorities discovered in a car four semiautomatic handguns that were being delivered to him from North Carolina. Law-enforcement officials say they then seized more than 300 "decks" of heroin, distribution paraphernalia, cash, and hollow-point ammunition from Kinston's house.
NEWS
February 2, 2009 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Violent crime went down 3 percent overall in Philadelphia last year, but results varied significantly among the 23 police districts. The Ninth District, including the western part of Center City and Fairmount, reported the greatest reduction: 27 percent. The 16th District, in West Philadelphia, and the Fifth District, in Manayunk and Roxborough, reported decreases of 15 percent or more. The Third District, in South Philadelphia and southeastern Center City, and the Seventh District, in the Northeast, reported the largest increases in violent crime: 12 percent.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Michael Hinkelman and Daily News Staff Writer
THE ANNUAL COST of violent crime in Philadelphia averages more than $472 per person, or a total of $736 million in 2010 alone. That's just one eye-popping conclusion of a new study examining costs associated with violent crime. The yearlong study by the Center for American Progress that was released Tuesday analyzed the direct and intangible costs associated with murders, robberies, assaults and rapes in eight U.S. cities, including Philadelphia. Direct costs are those borne by residents and city governments for increased spending on policing, prosecuting and incarcerating violent offenders; and by the victims of violent crime in medical expenses and lost income; as well as foregone tax revenue to cities.
NEWS
December 29, 2010 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The dealer and his lookout were peddling crack on a Camden side street. It was midnight in Whitman Park, a desperate neighborhood in a desperate city. An undercover officer made a buy. Camden Police Lt. Greg Carlin's radio crackled: "Move in, move in. " When the unmarked cars raced up, the dealer, a big guy in black, froze in the headlights. His lookout took off. Carlin hit the gas down a one-way. Other officers ran after the lookout, darting across an intersection. Carlin and another officer bore down on the fleeing suspect, tackling him before he made it into a patchwork of yards.
NEWS
September 2, 1987 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. George Charles Hoeh was a dynamic and well-loved Episcopal priest, a self-made millionaire and a thoroughly exuberant member of the human race. Even the detective investigating his murder remarked, "I haven't talked to anybody who didn't like him. " In his priestly life, Father Hoeh walked among the flock of his small, secure neighborhood parish in Brooklyn and served as confessor, comforter and social conscience. But he walked more dangerous paths in private life - on those frequent occasions when he abandoned Brooklyn for the relaxation of his commodious retreat in the affluent Sweetwater section of Mullica Township, N.J. It was there, on a Friday in June last year, that Father Hoeh, 58, carelessly invited home a stranger, a young man who called himself Paul and said he was from Minnesota.
NEWS
January 6, 2010 | By DAVID GAMBACORTA, gambacd@phillynews.com 215-854-5994
There was a time - say, three years ago - when Philadelphia was "Killadelphia," and many people seemed to think the city was about as safe a place to walk around as a lion's den at feeding time. While acknowledging that the city is still far from a utopia, Mayor Nutter, Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey and other officials joined yesterday to laud a 10 percent across-the-board drop in violent crime in 2009. Oversized color charts, situated inside North Philadelphia's 22nd District's roll-call room, bore the fruits of a year of progress: Homicides fell 8.4 percent, from 333 in 2008 to 305 last year; aggravated assaults fell 10.2 percent from 9,350 to 8,398; rapes dropped 13.2 percent, from 1,105 to 957, and robberies were down 6.5 percent, 9,343 to 8,738.
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | By Sergio R. Bustos, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sun was going down two evenings ago as Art Benica described to a gathering how a young woman was slain last year while working as a night clerk at a motel in Virginia Beach, Va. He told how the woman had screamed, begging two robbers not to hurt her. He told how the two thugs took $230 from the cash register and then discussed who would kill her. The woman killed by a shot to the back of the head was Benica's sister-in- law, Julia Benica....
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | By Dwight Ott, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Previte gets angry when she thinks about it. "I watched this little 14-year-old charged with murder bobbing for apples with the other juveniles," said Previte, superintendent of the Camden County Youth Center in Blackwood. "He slurped up the activities like a 9-year-old, as though he had never done anything like this before. "I watched him bob nine times to compete with the other kids, and I watched him compete so hard at musical chairs. I said to myself, 'Who did this to this child?
NEWS
May 11, 2007
Several of you have ambitious, long-term plans to address the root causes of violent crime, which citizens cite as the top issue of this campaign. But tell us what you'd do in your first year as mayor to make sure there is less violent crime in Philadelphia in 2008 than in 2007. Bob Brady Cutting crime in Philadelphia will be my top priority as mayor. During my first term, I will put 1,000 additional police, parole and parent truancy officers on the streets. I will work with the Philadelphia police, who have endorsed me, to put more officers in the neighborhoods and reengage neighborhood policing.
NEWS
October 20, 1988 | By Kitty Dumas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some Oxford Circle residents were told this week that help exists if one of their worst fears is realized - if they become victims of violent crime. Officer Kevin Corr, victims assistance officer for the Second District of the Philadelphia Police Department, Harbison Avenue and Levick Streets, spoke to residents at the Oxford Circle Civic Association Tuesday night about help available to victims. Corr told those at the sparsely attended meeting that if they were injured or suffered other losses as a result of violent crime, they could be compensated.
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NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY JERRY LARGE
  JUST IN TIME for Halloween, a new poll asks what Americans fear most. It isn't zombies or ghosts. These lists of fears and concerns are more than entertainment. They are a window into how we view the dangers in our lives. Researchers at Chapman University, in Southern California, conducted a lengthy survey of adults from across the country, then organized the responses into four areas of fear or concern, personal fears, crime, natural disasters and what they call "fear factors" in which researchers tried to figure out who has what fears and why. In general, Americans think crime rates are climbing, when in fact they've been declining for about 20 years.
NEWS
September 10, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
When NFL running back Ray Rice applied to a pre-trial intervention program on May 1 - which, if completed, would help dismiss the charges against him - he had to clear more hurdles than many other applicants. Those accepted into the program have typically committed minor crimes, such as theft or drug possession. Rice, accused of punching his then-fiancée in an elevator at Atlantic City's Revel Casino Hotel earlier this year, was charged with aggravated assault - a violent crime.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
WHEN KENNETH Todd was released from prison last month on a 2010 armed-robbery charge, he was supposed to report to his parole officer. He never showed up, and no one ever heard from him. Until two weeks ago, that is. Todd, 47, is accused of committing a violent home invasion on July 25, according to the U.S. Marshals Service, which, with police, is scouring the city for him. "Todd has spent most of his adult life as a violent criminal, and...
NEWS
June 10, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DR. PAUL J. FINK admitted to feeling a bit uneasy. There he was with 100 community leaders at an anti-crime summit in Graterford prison, sitting across from 100 inmates who were unlikely ever again to see the light of freedom. To get to the chapel, where the meeting was held, Fink and his group had to follow guards through the many clanging gates and locks that served as a stark reminder of what it must be like to be shut away for life. But to Dr. Fink's relief and satisfaction, the inmates were just as eager as the community leaders to find answers to what was happening to young people outside in the violent streets.
NEWS
May 7, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
After rising for a decade, violent and property crimes dropped on SEPTA subway and elevated lines last year, as fare-evasion arrests skyrocketed. SEPTA Police Chief Thomas J. Nestel III credited a change in police tactics: more officers in the subways, a crackdown on minor crimes, and a focus on fare jumpers. In 2013, there were 464 reported violent and property crimes on the Broad Street subway and the Market-Frankford elevated/subway line, down 14 percent from 541 in 2012. Violent and property crimes include murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, theft, and arson.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | BY BARRY LATZER
  AS CONCERN about economic inequality rises to the top of the issue agenda, it is instructive to note that the upturn in poverty of recent years has not been accompanied by a rise in violent crime. To the contrary, since 2008, unemployment and homicides have been inversely related. Is this a puzzling anomaly? Most people assume that hard times cause crime spikes. They reason, plausibly enough, that financial pressures - as a consequence of, say, becoming unemployed - lead to stress, anger and violence.
NEWS
January 5, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
COATESVILLE Coatesville, long considered the hotbed of crime in Chester County, went without a homicide in 2013 after seeing six, including three in 10 days, the previous year. Law enforcement officials are attributing the drop to an intense targeting of high-risk criminals and to factors outside their control - such as the weather. "You don't know which one of those was the silver bullet that really caused this drop," Chester County District Attorney Thomas Hogan said Thursday.
NEWS
December 30, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN Wilson Rodriguez thought he had something worthwhile to say, but he wondered why a young audience would listen to a 21-year-old parolee convicted as a teenager in the bludgeoning death of a sleeping homeless man. He told more than a dozen youngsters in an event hosted by the Camden Board of Education he and his friends "did something horrible and someone ended up dying. " Two or three hands shot up, and questions followed: Why did you do it? How do you feel now? The children wanted to know more.
NEWS
December 22, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
NORRISTOWN A former leader of the Dauphin County witness protection program became the new head of the state's Victim Advocate Office Friday and said she hoped to give a stronger voice to Pennsylvania's crime victims. "I want every single citizen of the commonwealth to understand what their rights are as crime victims," said Jennifer Storm, 38, of Camp Hill. Storm was sworn in Friday morning at a ceremony at the Victim Services Center in Norristown, surrounded by local advocates and members of the law enforcement community.
NEWS
December 20, 2013
IT'S A GOOD NEWS story that can be told partly by the numbers. Crime is down again in Philadelphia this year, led by a steep drop in the number of homicides. If the trends hold, Philadelphia will end 2013 with a total of about 250 slayings, about 30 percent fewer than in 2012. This is a significant decline in just one year; it also will be the lowest number of homicides recorded since 1967, nearly 50 years ago. But, this is also a human story. It means that more people survived another year without ending up dead in the street or sitting in a cell awaiting trial for murder.
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