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Violent Crime

NEWS
October 30, 1994 | By David Zucchino, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The land is full of bloody crime and the city is full of violence. - Ezekiel 7:23 Across the land, waves of violence seem to crest and break, terrorizing Americans in cities and suburbs, in prairie towns and mountain hollows. The President warns the nation: "Crime is increasing. Confidence in rigid and speedy justice is decreasing. " Among urban children aged 10 to 14, homicides are up 150 percent, robberies are up 192 percent, assaults up 290 percent. A national commission on violence describes a nation's fears: "To millions of Americans few things are more pervasive, more frightening, more real today than violent crime.
NEWS
October 28, 2002 | By Clea Benson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Though the Street administration has made dramatic claims about the effectiveness of extra police details at hundreds of drug corners, police statistics show only a slight decrease in violent crime since the initiative began, an Inquirer analysis shows. But residents are less likely to find their cars stolen or to report break-ins at their homes since Operation Safe Streets began in May. Property crime fell by 16 percent citywide from May through August. Murders, rapes, robberies and aggravated assaults dropped 2 percent citywide during the first four months of Operation Safe Streets, from May to August, compared with the same months last year.
NEWS
December 29, 1997 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Lead paint - already blamed for damaging kids' IQ's, making them hyperactive and leaving them with brain or kidney damage - is now under investigation as a possible agent of crime. Based partly on studies in Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, some researchers say young children exposed to high lead levels may be more prone to juvenile delinquency or adult violence. The question is especially important in a city like Philadelphia, recently described by the Environmental Protection Agency as a major "hot spot" for lead.
NEWS
August 1, 2000 | By Barbara Laker, Daily News Staff Writer
Nothing forces families to abandon cities faster than violent crime. In a thriving and lively city, safety and security lure them back. In the last few years, police departments have fought to make streets safer. In many cases, they've succeeded. Across the country, violent crimes reported to police dropped for an eighth consecutive year in 1999, making it the longest-running crime decline on record. For the first time in more than a decade, for instance, Philadelphia's murder toll stood less than 300 last year.
NEWS
January 2, 2013 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Mayor Nutter took office in 2008, he set some audacious goals for ending Philadelphia's long run as one of the nation's most violent big cities. Within two years, homicides had dropped by nearly a quarter and shootings by more than 15 percent. But the flush of early success has since been tempered by the city's toughest streets, where violent crime has proven once again to be deeply rooted. Progress in recent years has been more incremental. And with homicides - the most closely watched barometer of crime - ground has been lost.
NEWS
December 31, 2008 | By Barbara Boyer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With homicides down 15 percent and violent crime off 3 percent from last year, Mayor Nutter and Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey yesterday declared their anticrime initiatives a success despite falling short of lofty goals set in January. The mayor and commissioner had hoped to reduce killings by 25 percent and violent crime by 20 percent. "This is the sharpest decline in homicides in a decade here in the city of Philadelphia," Nutter said at a news conference held in the 18th District in Southwest Philadelphia, a district that saw a 72 percent drop in killings.
NEWS
October 24, 1997 | By Clea Benson and Craig R. McCoy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Drug dealers waving handguns sometimes chase each other down Loraya Butler's block in North Philadelphia. A few months ago, their shots whistled past her toddler grandchildren as they played outside. The gunfire often greets Butler at 11 p.m. when she gets off the bus coming home from work. It jolts her awake at 1 or 2 a.m. It's not hard for Butler, 43, to identify her neighborhood's biggest crime problem: "The killings, the senseless killings, and the drugs. " Glenn Devitt also worries about crime, but a different kind.
NEWS
December 22, 1993 | By TRUDY RUBIN
Spending two weeks in Russia after an absence of nearly two years makes one painfully aware that democracy is becoming synonymous here with disorder. Market reforms are increasingly identified with crime, corruption and a dramatic gap between the newly rich and everyone else. That, I believe, is the major reason that the communists and ultra- nationalists did well in the recent Russian elections. Democracy and capitalism are getting a bad name here. Since those elections, I have heard many liberals question whether democratic elections are premature.
NEWS
January 2, 2007
IN PHILADELPHIA'S fight to reduce violence and murder, 2006 was a year of frustration and failure. The sobering year-end homicide figures - 404 as of Friday - show a spike in deaths that has defied explanation, as well as new police strategies, endless marches and rallies, and pleas from community activists and politicians. But as this editorial page year-in-homicides reveals, there was plenty of inaction, too, both at the local and state level. January: We called on Mayor Street to strike a higher crime-fighting profile.
NEWS
November 6, 1994 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A gangster in Kitakyushu killed himself after a shootout with police. A lovers' quarrel in a Tokyo suburb ended with more shots at police and another suicide. Armed bandits took millions of yen from banks in Mito and Fukuoka. And, in a case that mesmerized Japan in much the way the O.J. Simpson saga has fascinated the United States, a Tokyo doctor was shot to death by a dissatisfied former patient as he passed through a crowded railway station. For the first time in memory, ordinary Japanese citizens, not just members of the Mafialike Yakuza, are being killed with handguns.
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