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Violet

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1999 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
It doesn't take long for Violet, the Jeanine Tesori-Brian Crawley musical at the Arden Theatre Company, to worm its way into your affections. It takes about five minutes, in fact, or until the moment the young woman of the title surveys her fellow passengers on a bus from North Carolina to Tulsa and begins selecting features for the new face she hopes to acquire: Lips? Thin. Cheeks? Flat. I sure don't want mine like that. Nose? Bent. Ears? Runts. Got four eyes and he can't see once.
NEWS
April 10, 1990 | By ALICE CRANE KOVLER
For a brief span they will be among us, popping up on curbsides, beneath hedgerows, beside telephone poles, around vacant lots - dainty five-petaled blue faces hovering above a green island of heart-shaped leaves: the common blue violet of spring. According to the ancients, violets are ruled by Venus. A quaint idea, it took root in my imagination when I first heard it. Perhaps this wayside weed was a messenger of sorts, if only we could commune with it. Of course, you have to slow down to commune with a violet.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | BY MICHAEL RUSSELL, Daily News Staff Writer russelm@phillynews.com
"MAN, I would kill for that dress. " And thus "Violet & Daisy" was born. Violet and Daisy (Alexis Bledel, Saoirse Ronan) are two teenage girls who are a part of an assassin organization headed by a man who sleeps on a park bench. The girls begrudgingly accept a mission to assassinate a man during their vacation so they can afford the newest dress from their favorite designer. But what should be a simple mission gets infinitely harder when the girls end up befriending their target, a sweet man who, it turns out, wants to die. The girls spend the rest of the movie mostly in the target's apartment as they try to work up the nerve to kill their new buddy.
NEWS
December 7, 1995 | For The Inquirer / JILL ANNA GREENBERG
Maybe it was the surroundings. At Feeney's Nursery & Garden Center in Feasterville, Steven Lewis, 3, made like a shrinking violet when he met Santa. Despite the bearded one's jolly reputation, Steven decided he was better off behind his mother, Beth Lewis of Feasterville.
NEWS
October 4, 1996 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
While TV lesbians wrestle with the issue of coming out of the closet, the female lead in the movie "Bound" does not equivocate. Beaten, bound, gagged and literally locked in a closet, Corky (Gina Gershon) - a declared lesbian with tattoos and a pickup truck and everything - cuts her bonds and bursts out with a triumphant karate kick. It's a wildly campy moment, typical of the movie's smarty-pants approach to the gritty crime drama it aims to tell, making "Bound" the latest independent caper film to pay homage to the Coen brothers and Quentin Tarantino.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1997 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Mo Ogrodnik's Ripe plays around with some pretty risky stuff: the sexual awakening of teenage girls. But, in fact, this first-time writer-director isn't playing around at all. Her edgy exploration of what it means to be, and become, a woman is serious, provocative and anything but exploitative. Ogrodnik captures the whole complicated mess of it - the conflicting feelings of exhilaration and trepidation, of mystery and confusion, allure and revulsion, the sense of discovery - with dark wit and trenchant observation.
NEWS
May 24, 1995 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
A Memorial Mass will be celebrated today for Baroness Violet 'M Biliani van Zuylen, van Nyevelt Flounders, who fought the Nazis with the Belgian Resistance movement, a woman with a world view whose life began in colonial- era Africa near the shores of the Congo River. Flounders, who would have been 72 in June, died Monday. She was a Drexel Hill resident for the past 45 years. "My mother was born a baroness, a family title acquired through her father, Baron Albert William van Zuylen, van Nyevelt," said a daughter, Euphemia "Mia" Flounders-Brower.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2011 | By Samantha Critchell, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Prabal Gurung had to live up to the hype. Before Saturday's runway show at New York Fashion Week, the last time style insiders had heard from him he won the Council of Fashion Designers of America award for emerging talent. Consider him emerging no more. His new spring collection, presented at the modern IAC building on Manhattan's West Side, put him in the big leagues. "Loved, loved, loved it," said Adam Glassman, creative director of O, The Oprah Magazine. "Super fresh and chic.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"AUGUST: OSAGE County" is in its own way a feel-good movie, in that it's bound to make you feel good about your own family, especially post-holiday. Did you get through the season without knocking your mother to the floor and informing her that you are now in charge? Well, then you have a healthier relationship than Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts in "AOC," a sort of MMA (mixed-martial acting) cage match between the two Oscar-winning Hollywood titans. Some of this takes the form of an actual brawl, but it also expresses itself as an extreme awards-season performance pitch (Roberts and Streep will compete for a Golden Globe on Sunday evening)
NEWS
June 26, 2000 | By Karen Heller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There is nothin' like a dame. Not one like Dame Elizabeth Taylor. She out-queens the queen, and has the rocks to go knuckle-to-knuckle. She does as she pleases. She arrives when she wants - in the case of last night's gala in her honor, a good four hours after mere mortals. The violet-eyed thespian, as famous for the drama of her off-screen life as her cinematic roles, was honored last night with the third Marian Anderson Award for her role in raising $120 million for AIDS research.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 17, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Violet W. Addison, 106, of Philadelphia, a music teacher, a musician, and the former accompanist to the All City Boys Choir, died Tuesday, May 6, at Stapeley in Germantown. Mrs. Addison lived independently for many years in an apartment building on Ford Road, but moved to Stapeley in the mid-2000s when she needed assistance. She lived a full life centered on her church, various choirs, and her teaching career. "Life is God's greatest gift to you," she liked to say. "What you do with your life is your gift to God. " Known to friends as "Vi," Mrs. Addison taught music and remedial reading at Philadelphia's Martha Washington School for many years.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"AUGUST: OSAGE County" is in its own way a feel-good movie, in that it's bound to make you feel good about your own family, especially post-holiday. Did you get through the season without knocking your mother to the floor and informing her that you are now in charge? Well, then you have a healthier relationship than Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts in "AOC," a sort of MMA (mixed-martial acting) cage match between the two Oscar-winning Hollywood titans. Some of this takes the form of an actual brawl, but it also expresses itself as an extreme awards-season performance pitch (Roberts and Streep will compete for a Golden Globe on Sunday evening)
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | BY MICHAEL RUSSELL, Daily News Staff Writer russelm@phillynews.com
"MAN, I would kill for that dress. " And thus "Violet & Daisy" was born. Violet and Daisy (Alexis Bledel, Saoirse Ronan) are two teenage girls who are a part of an assassin organization headed by a man who sleeps on a park bench. The girls begrudgingly accept a mission to assassinate a man during their vacation so they can afford the newest dress from their favorite designer. But what should be a simple mission gets infinitely harder when the girls end up befriending their target, a sweet man who, it turns out, wants to die. The girls spend the rest of the movie mostly in the target's apartment as they try to work up the nerve to kill their new buddy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2011
  THE GIZMO: UltraViolet shines a new light on the movie/TV viewing experience. OLD SCHOOL/NEW WAYS: Like to buy, rather than rent movies and TV shows so you can enjoy them more than once, watch on different devices and share your library? Buying hard-disc goods - DVDs and high-def Blu-rays - is one obvious way to go. But you need a dedicated player to view 'em on, storage space and a way to carry 'em around. Oh, so 2005. How about downloading movies and shows on a multipurpose device you've already got up and running in your living room or pocket?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2011 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
'This country, this experiment, America, this hubris: What a lament, if no one saw it go. Here today, gone tomorrow. " Those lines, offhandedly delivered in the middle of the second act of this immense play, are the pivotal point of Tracy Letts' Pulitzer Prize-winning August: Osage County . Maybe all ambitious family dramas (dysfunctional goes without saying, from the Oresteia to Lear ) use the drama of family as a way of talking about the drama of nation ("something is rotten in the state of Denmark")
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2011 | By Samantha Critchell, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Prabal Gurung had to live up to the hype. Before Saturday's runway show at New York Fashion Week, the last time style insiders had heard from him he won the Council of Fashion Designers of America award for emerging talent. Consider him emerging no more. His new spring collection, presented at the modern IAC building on Manhattan's West Side, put him in the big leagues. "Loved, loved, loved it," said Adam Glassman, creative director of O, The Oprah Magazine. "Super fresh and chic.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2011 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
Context counts in the two-part Violet Oakley exhibition at Chestnut Hill's Woodmere Museum - a virtually forgotten series of her murals, and a group show of female artists active in Paris while Oakley was an art student there. Oakley's William Penn series at the State Capitol Building are her most celebrated murals. But the monumental murals from 1910-11 in Woodmere's permanent collection may come as a surprise to many. Oakley, then 36, created The Building of the House of Wisdom for the entrance hall of a townhouse architect Frank Miles Day was completing at 17th and Locust Streets for Charlton Yarnall of the Ellis Yarnall & Son importing firm.
NEWS
April 18, 2011
Violet Cowden, 94, a former president of the WASP veterans organization whose experiences and indomitable spirit inspired later generations of female pilots, died April 10 of congestive heart failure at Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian in Newport Beach, Calif., said her daughter Kim Ruiz. Her passion for flying was born when she was a young girl envying the hawks soaring above her family's South Dakota farm in the 1920s. She learned to fly out of an airfield in Spearfish, S.D., while she was a young first-grade teacher in the early 1940s.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With her all-encompassing earth-mother voice and her easy poise, Estelle Parsons - opening here Tuesday in a week's run of the Tony-winning August: Osage County - fully inhabits the American stage's newest indelible role: the pill-ravaged, tongue-lashing, acid-fueled, man-shrinking Violet. And did we mention foot-stomping? Much has been made of Parsons' emphatic ups and downs on the imposing staircase Violet treads - a total of 352 steps per performance. For Parsons, 82 and a lifelong exerciser, it's all in a day's work, or a double day's work when there's a matinee and an evening performance, bringing the total to 704. Violet is the fictional matriarch of the highly challenged (and strikingly funny)
NEWS
February 16, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Violet Branch Johnson, 94, a retired public relations executive, died Jan. 20 of complications from a stroke at Stapeley, a retirement residence in Germantown. Mrs. Johnson grew up in South Philadelphia and graduated from West Philadelphia High School. She earned an associate degree from Temple University. At 13, she joined the Girls' Friendly Society, a social and service organization affiliated with the Episcopal Church. She remained involved with the organization for the next 50 years, singing in its choir and later organizing concerts and mentoring younger members.
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