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Violin Concerto

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2001 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Seemingly on cue with the end of a century that made ugly the preferred mode in music, a prince of pretty has emerged: His name is Lowell Liebermann. The New York composer has had a tough time stating his case with his many critics, as if the concepts of pleasant and substantive were mutually exclusive. Often they are, and sometimes they are in Liebermann's music. His Flute Concerto, for instance, is so clotted with sweets that it makes the Prokofievian model upon which it is based seem acrid.
NEWS
January 12, 2001 | by Tom DiNardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA, Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos conducting; Roberto Diaz, viola soloist. 8 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Tuesday at Academy of Music, Broad and Locust streets. Tickets: $18-$60. Info: 215-893-1999. The burnished, dark-wood timbre of the viola hasn't inspired the huge catalog of solo works lavished on the violin and cello. Yet, for the Philadelphia Orchestra's first-chair violist Roberto Diaz, its sound is "melted chocolate, dark, smooth and rich. . .and slightly addictive.
NEWS
September 28, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Concertos can arise at such unlikely times and places, even the composer is left surprised. Slim, elegant Clarice Assad, for example, looks as if she just walked off a Lower East Side fashion shoot rather than emerging from the kind of sunless, airless composing studio where classical composers tend to live. In truth, the 28-year-old daughter of the beloved Brazilian guitarist Sergio Assad lives neither place. She sings and plays jazz with her trio in New York clubs, and never foresaw herself writing the Violin Concerto that violinist Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg plays tonight with the Philadelphia Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra has a rather plastic idea of the concert format these days. On Wednesday night, that meant a hybrid of the talk-and-play concerts it has done under various names over the last two decades, plus offering the LiveNote app that allows the audience to follow real-time program notes on mobile devices. The start time was earlier than usual (6:30 p.m.), and tickets a flat $45 for an intermission-less concert of about 75 minutes. It would be hard to say the format struck a chord with ticket buyers, given the audience in the low hundreds that turned out in Verizon Hall.
NEWS
April 13, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
During the head-spinning moments following the announcement of her Pulitzer Prize for music on Monday, Philadelphia composer Jennifer Higdon thought mostly about thanking people in her more distant past. "It's not so much about me, but my high school band director, Larry Hicks," said Higdon, 47, who grew up in Seymour, Tenn. "I should also call my flute teacher, Mrs. Bentley. " The Pulitzer for her Violin Concerto - which was premiered by the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra last year and is scheduled for a Philadelphia performance in February - came just 10 weeks after her Percussion Concerto won the Grammy Award for best classical contemporary composition.
NEWS
February 28, 2016
1 p.m. Sunday on WRTI-FM (90.1): An all-star performance. Award-winning guest maestro Fabio Luisi conducts the orchestra, with acclaimed guest violinist Christian Tetzlaff. Featured are two of Tchaikovsky's most important works, the Violin Concerto in D and the Symphony No. 6, the "Pathétique. "
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, Classical Music Critic
Is artistic freedom worth the price of artistic isolation? The answer for Philadelphia composer Michael Hersch looks better when considered over the long term. After early successes in the 1990s with expressionistic orchestral works performed under the likes of Mariss Jansons, Hersch has long gone against neo-tonal trends and in ways that have only intensified over the last five years. For some, he's one of the few out there able and compelled to speak in unvarnished truth.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013
For the first time in more than 13 years, WRTI-FM (90.1) will broadcast the Philadelphia Orchestra live in concert on Friday afternoon. Yannick Nézet-Séguin leads the Philadelphians in works by Schumann, Janacek, and Dvorak, and violinist Gil Shaham performs Brahms' Violin Concerto . The 2 p.m. concert in Verizon Hall is dedicated to Wolfgang Sawallisch, who died in February, and opens with the Adagio espressivo from the Symphony No. 2...
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
William de Pasquale, 78, whose regal visage held a magnetic, four-decade presence at the front of the Philadelphia Orchestra's first violin section and who was a member of a remarkable family of string players, died Sunday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital of complications relating to prostate cancer. Though Mr. de Pasquale slipped into various titles with the orchestra - associate concertmaster, acting concertmaster, second concertmaster, and co-concertmaster - the job for him always amounted to being Mr. Dependable.
NEWS
June 6, 1988 | By Andrew Stiller, Special to The Inquirer
The longer one deals with the Concerto Soloists Chamber Orchestra, the more absurd it seems that an ensemble devoted largely to the performance of 18th- century music should pay so little attention to 18th-century performance practice. The problem is most noticeable when the group strips down to its strings- only core, as it did for all but one piece on a program given at the Church of the Holy Trinity on Rittenhouse Square yesterday afternoon. A symphony possibly by Frederick the Great of Prussia; one of Antonio Vivaldi's dozen or so C-major violin concertos (identified only by an out-of-date catalogue number)
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NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, Classical Music Critic
Is artistic freedom worth the price of artistic isolation? The answer for Philadelphia composer Michael Hersch looks better when considered over the long term. After early successes in the 1990s with expressionistic orchestral works performed under the likes of Mariss Jansons, Hersch has long gone against neo-tonal trends and in ways that have only intensified over the last five years. For some, he's one of the few out there able and compelled to speak in unvarnished truth.
NEWS
February 28, 2016
1 p.m. Sunday on WRTI-FM (90.1): An all-star performance. Award-winning guest maestro Fabio Luisi conducts the orchestra, with acclaimed guest violinist Christian Tetzlaff. Featured are two of Tchaikovsky's most important works, the Violin Concerto in D and the Symphony No. 6, the "Pathétique. "
NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
At what point does music become more of a tourist experience than art? Philadelphia Orchestra conductor-in-residence Cristian Macelaru walked all over such not-so-fine lines on Thursday at the Kimmel Center in a winningly idiosyncratic program bookended by two travelogues in sound from his native Romania - with folk elements cleaned and polished to a high gloss. Such music - Ligeti's Romanian Concerto and Enescu's Romanian Rhapsody Op. 11 No. 1 - can be a point of pride or a source of embarrassment to those who know the less-mediated roots of it all. But Macelaru had a whale of a time, also using these crowd-pleasing pieces for a more serious examination of great composers on the cusp of greatness with Dvorák's Violin Concerto featuring Sarah Chang, and Beethoven's Symphony No. 1 . Nothing trivial about that.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra has a rather plastic idea of the concert format these days. On Wednesday night, that meant a hybrid of the talk-and-play concerts it has done under various names over the last two decades, plus offering the LiveNote app that allows the audience to follow real-time program notes on mobile devices. The start time was earlier than usual (6:30 p.m.), and tickets a flat $45 for an intermission-less concert of about 75 minutes. It would be hard to say the format struck a chord with ticket buyers, given the audience in the low hundreds that turned out in Verizon Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Symphony orchestras draw great cachet from their geographical homes: Any group with Vienna, Berlin, or Amsterdam in its name is going to command immediate attention from audiences, even if those cities' third-tier orchestras would be lucky to match Scranton's Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic. So can an orchestra from Turkey, Iceland, or Lapland hope to be noticed at the world's busiest orchestra festival, the summertime BBC Proms at London's Royal Albert Hall? Actually, it can. One of this year's Proms winners seems to be the Borusan Istanbul Philharmonic Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013
For the first time in more than 13 years, WRTI-FM (90.1) will broadcast the Philadelphia Orchestra live in concert on Friday afternoon. Yannick Nézet-Séguin leads the Philadelphians in works by Schumann, Janacek, and Dvorak, and violinist Gil Shaham performs Brahms' Violin Concerto . The 2 p.m. concert in Verizon Hall is dedicated to Wolfgang Sawallisch, who died in February, and opens with the Adagio espressivo from the Symphony No. 2...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The concerto tends to be a heroic medium, with an esteemed virtuoso pitted against an army of orchestral musicians, both vying for musical foreground. How unusual it was, then, to encounter two new ones - Jonathan Leshnoff's Cello Concerto on Monday with Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia, and Paul Moravec's Violin Concerto on Friday with Symphony in C - that act like conscientious objectors to that romantic-era tradition, and do so with great artistic resourcefulness. Noncompetitive concertos are nothing new, but can pose substantial continuity problems because they lack an obvious musical argument (the Korngold concertos, for example, get by on surface beauty)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Yannick Nézet-Séguin began Wednesday's Philadelphia Orchestra concert at a point where his predecessor Charles Dutoit would have ended: Ravel's La Valse . Was something Oedipal going on here? Whatever the case, the program evolved into a provocative package, allowing familiar music to be heard with refreshed ears. Ravel's 1920 piece is about the dissolution of the 19th century, embodied by a waltz that refuses to adapt no matter how much the harmonic floor crumbles beneath it. The piece eventually waltzes itself to death, going down with a final whack of militaristic percussion.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
William de Pasquale, 78, whose regal visage held a magnetic, four-decade presence at the front of the Philadelphia Orchestra's first violin section and who was a member of a remarkable family of string players, died Sunday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital of complications relating to prostate cancer. Though Mr. de Pasquale slipped into various titles with the orchestra - associate concertmaster, acting concertmaster, second concertmaster, and co-concertmaster - the job for him always amounted to being Mr. Dependable.
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