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Violin Concerto

ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2001 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Hilary Hahn made her reputation doing what other violinists do, but with the Olympian purity that comes with unsullied youth. Over the last 18 months, however, something else has emerged, and it appeared in consolidated form Thursday when she played Stravinsky's Violin Concerto with the Philadelphia Orchestra: Hahn is also a revisionist. The concerto hasn't been taken seriously over the years, having been written in 1931, 18 years after The Rite of Spring and in a period when Stravinsky's music became more civilized, classical and stylish, and less substantial.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2001 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Seemingly on cue with the end of a century that made ugly the preferred mode in music, a prince of pretty has emerged: His name is Lowell Liebermann. The New York composer has had a tough time stating his case with his many critics, as if the concepts of pleasant and substantive were mutually exclusive. Often they are, and sometimes they are in Liebermann's music. His Flute Concerto, for instance, is so clotted with sweets that it makes the Prokofievian model upon which it is based seem acrid.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2001 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
In the midst of preparation for its forthcoming Asian tour, the Philadelphia Orchestra paused to do something completely unrelated: conclude its Philadelphia season with nontour repertoire that revealed a new, unexpected Wolfgang Sawallisch specialty. Having ridden Gustav Mahler's coattails to fashionability in recent years, Edward Elgar (1857-1934) is now known for much more than his Enigma Variations, though his Violin Concerto, arguably the longest in the repertoire, made only its fourth appearance with the Philadelphia Orchestra Thursday at the Academy of Music.
NEWS
January 12, 2001 | by Tom DiNardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA, Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos conducting; Roberto Diaz, viola soloist. 8 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Tuesday at Academy of Music, Broad and Locust streets. Tickets: $18-$60. Info: 215-893-1999. The burnished, dark-wood timbre of the viola hasn't inspired the huge catalog of solo works lavished on the violin and cello. Yet, for the Philadelphia Orchestra's first-chair violist Roberto Diaz, its sound is "melted chocolate, dark, smooth and rich. . .and slightly addictive.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2000 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Contemporary music champions can seem like the perpetual whiners of the classical music set: Every failure is followed by thickets of "if onlys" that exonerate the music of any misdeeds. But on evidence of Richard Danielpour's Violin Concerto heard in its local premiere by the Philadelphia Orchestra on Thursday, they're right. Though not Danielpour's most consistent work, the concerto shows how a sympathetic convergence of composer, performers and circumstances can make new music readily programmable with Mozart's Don Giovanni overture and Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique.
NEWS
July 17, 2000 | by Tom DiNardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts, 52nd and Parkside Avenues. Tickets: $22-$57, $8 for lawn tickets. Info: 215-893-1999. Arias from the opera and Broadway, followed by evenings of Beethoven and Russian gems, make up the Mann schedule in this next-to-last week of Orchestra programs. Miguel Harth-Bedoya makes his Mann debut tonight, and David Robertson returns to take over Wednesday and Thursday. Monday Conductor Miguel Harth-Bedoya: This busy Peruvian-born Curtis graduate will soon add the music directorship of Fort Worth Symphony to that of the Eugene (Ore.
NEWS
June 26, 2000 | by Tom DiNardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA, Mann Center for the Performing Arts, 52nd and Parkside Avenues. Tickets: $22-$57, $8 for lawn tickets (advance lawn tickets $2). Info: 215-893-1999. It wouldn't seem like summer without familiar classics by the Philadelphia Orchestra inside the Mann shell, or on a blanket with a bottle of wine under the stars. This season's schedule offers five instead of six weeks of programs, with concerts held last week at three local community venues. This whole first week belongs to revered violinist Itzhak Perl-man, longtime friend of the Mann, who will play tonight and Thursday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2000 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
With the works of Dmitri Shostakovich making serious inroads into the standard repertoire of late, Wolfgang Sawallisch posed an inevitable question: Can Philadelphia Orchestra audiences take two of the brooding Russian master's weightiest works on one program? Besides the temperamental and formal similarities of the Symphony No. 5 and Violin Concerto No. 1 (depressive slow movements and manic dance movements), there's the considerable matter of whether listeners can stand the intensity of such musical bitterness.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2000 | By Charles Huckabee, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Guitarist and composer Allen Krantz will bring a gift when he performs with clarinetist Donald Montanaro and harpist Margarita Csonka Montanaro in the Philadelphia Chamber Ensemble's concerts this weekend. Krantz wrote his Winter Music, for clarinet, harp and guitar, for the ensemble and with the Montanaros in mind. "There's nothing I know for that combination," Krantz said this week. "I have played on the series a few times," he said, "and wanted to do something. . . . And they agreed.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1996 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It takes a brave man to make a quiet end. People like things to end with a bang, but Krzysztof Penderecki brings his new Second Violin Concerto to a halt with the violinist sustaining a long sigh, as if shushing the orchestra and audience. Chantal Juillet played the concerto beautifully with the Philadelphia Orchestra last night, leaving attentive expressions on the faces of many in the sparsely filled Academy of Music. The conductor composed the work between 1992 and 1995. Simple patterns form the melodies in a work whose dominant quality is intense searching.
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