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Violin Concerto

NEWS
January 12, 2001 | by Tom DiNardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA, Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos conducting; Roberto Diaz, viola soloist. 8 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Tuesday at Academy of Music, Broad and Locust streets. Tickets: $18-$60. Info: 215-893-1999. The burnished, dark-wood timbre of the viola hasn't inspired the huge catalog of solo works lavished on the violin and cello. Yet, for the Philadelphia Orchestra's first-chair violist Roberto Diaz, its sound is "melted chocolate, dark, smooth and rich. . .and slightly addictive.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2000 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Contemporary music champions can seem like the perpetual whiners of the classical music set: Every failure is followed by thickets of "if onlys" that exonerate the music of any misdeeds. But on evidence of Richard Danielpour's Violin Concerto heard in its local premiere by the Philadelphia Orchestra on Thursday, they're right. Though not Danielpour's most consistent work, the concerto shows how a sympathetic convergence of composer, performers and circumstances can make new music readily programmable with Mozart's Don Giovanni overture and Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique.
NEWS
July 17, 2000 | by Tom DiNardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts, 52nd and Parkside Avenues. Tickets: $22-$57, $8 for lawn tickets. Info: 215-893-1999. Arias from the opera and Broadway, followed by evenings of Beethoven and Russian gems, make up the Mann schedule in this next-to-last week of Orchestra programs. Miguel Harth-Bedoya makes his Mann debut tonight, and David Robertson returns to take over Wednesday and Thursday. Monday Conductor Miguel Harth-Bedoya: This busy Peruvian-born Curtis graduate will soon add the music directorship of Fort Worth Symphony to that of the Eugene (Ore.
NEWS
June 26, 2000 | by Tom DiNardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA, Mann Center for the Performing Arts, 52nd and Parkside Avenues. Tickets: $22-$57, $8 for lawn tickets (advance lawn tickets $2). Info: 215-893-1999. It wouldn't seem like summer without familiar classics by the Philadelphia Orchestra inside the Mann shell, or on a blanket with a bottle of wine under the stars. This season's schedule offers five instead of six weeks of programs, with concerts held last week at three local community venues. This whole first week belongs to revered violinist Itzhak Perl-man, longtime friend of the Mann, who will play tonight and Thursday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2000 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
With the works of Dmitri Shostakovich making serious inroads into the standard repertoire of late, Wolfgang Sawallisch posed an inevitable question: Can Philadelphia Orchestra audiences take two of the brooding Russian master's weightiest works on one program? Besides the temperamental and formal similarities of the Symphony No. 5 and Violin Concerto No. 1 (depressive slow movements and manic dance movements), there's the considerable matter of whether listeners can stand the intensity of such musical bitterness.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2000 | By Charles Huckabee, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Guitarist and composer Allen Krantz will bring a gift when he performs with clarinetist Donald Montanaro and harpist Margarita Csonka Montanaro in the Philadelphia Chamber Ensemble's concerts this weekend. Krantz wrote his Winter Music, for clarinet, harp and guitar, for the ensemble and with the Montanaros in mind. "There's nothing I know for that combination," Krantz said this week. "I have played on the series a few times," he said, "and wanted to do something. . . . And they agreed.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1996 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It takes a brave man to make a quiet end. People like things to end with a bang, but Krzysztof Penderecki brings his new Second Violin Concerto to a halt with the violinist sustaining a long sigh, as if shushing the orchestra and audience. Chantal Juillet played the concerto beautifully with the Philadelphia Orchestra last night, leaving attentive expressions on the faces of many in the sparsely filled Academy of Music. The conductor composed the work between 1992 and 1995. Simple patterns form the melodies in a work whose dominant quality is intense searching.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1996 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For as long as she can remember, Diane Monroe has had one foot in the world of classical music and the other in jazz. "I grew up listening to Bach and Beethoven," says the violinist, "but also Charlie Parker and Max Roach and Aretha Franklin, and I felt lucky about that. As a young pianist I learned the boogie-woogie first, and then I started classical lessons. " But in pieces such as Anthony Davis' MAPS: Violin Concerto, which she will play this weekend with Orchestra 2001, Monroe fuses both sides of her musical personality.
NEWS
November 23, 1995 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The baroque ensemble Philomel opens its 20th anniversary season with a program highlighted by concertos for four violins from a Vivaldi collection titled L'Estro Armonico. Joining the ensemble for these rarely performed works will be guest violinists Elizabeth Blumenstock and Lisa Weiss from San Francisco's Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra. Philomel violinists Nancy Wilson and David Myford will join Blumenstock and Weiss for the concertos. Also on the program will be Franz Benda's The Flute Concerto in E minor with Philomel's co-artistic director Elissa Berardi as soloist.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1994 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The long arm of Beethoven stretched across the Mann Music Center on Monday night, thanks to the long bow arm of soloist Joshua Bell, who played the Violin Concerto in D Major. Standing in his shirt-sleeves, limber as a willow, the young man gave a likewise limber performance with the Philadelphia Orchestra. The violinist also informed his interpretation with a thoughtfulness and searching quality that proved an alternative to noisier, more extroverted versions. Astutely shading and coloring his ideas, Bell moved through the concerto's turning points, treating the mighty cadenzas with more delicacy than is often heard.
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