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Virginia Woolf

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1991 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Theater Critic
Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf is nearly 30 years old, and though the play still gets its share of productions, it is showing its age in light of prevailing attitudes toward domestic turbulence and alcohol abuse. The first thing a theatergoer might ask as George and Martha savage each other and their two guests in a long, drunken evening of verbal and physical attacks is why these two didn't get divorced years ago. It is difficult to imagine a couple today, no matter how much they love or need each other (and George and Martha do love and need each other)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1991 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mention Virginia Woolf these days and far too many people think of the movie starring Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton. But Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? had nothing to do with the famous - some would say infamous - British author who alternately has been called one of the best writers of her time and one of the most overrated literary figures of the 20th century. Depressed by the threat of a Nazi invasion of Britain, and fearful that she might have yet another nervous breakdown, Woolf committed suicide 50 years ago today by stuffing her pockets with rocks and jumping into the River Ouse.
NEWS
May 28, 1992 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, the current production at Hedgerow Theater in Rose Valley, is a very dark comedy that delves into the marital woes of two 1950s academic couples. After a faculty party, protagonists George and Martha invite the younger Nick and Honey over for late-night drinks, but with the drinks come shocking fun and games. Martha suggests playing a sexual parlor game and the foursome drink Wild Turkey and Remy Martin endlessly. From there, the three-act play careers from humorous to surrealistic.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
'Truth and illusion. Who knows the difference, eh, toots?" That question is central to this juicy and monumental play, Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? And, it turns out, we're all of us "toots. " Theatre Exile's production, under Joe Canuso's smart direction, of this iconic American drama is both splendid and funny and wrenching, just as it should be. A highly skilled and subtle quartet of actors makes this happen. It's 2 a.m. A middle-age couple, George (the extraordinary Pearce Bunting)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1992 | By Penny Jeannechild, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Indigo Girl Emily Saliers has a new friend. Her name is Virginia Woolf. "I feel as though I have a living friendship with her," Saliers says of the British author who died in 1941. "Through her diaries, I've made a very immediate, personal connection. " Typically for both Saliers, 29, and Amy Ray, 28, the other half of the Indigo Girls, that connection turned to song. Virginia Woolf is one of 13 tracks on the Indigos' new album, Rites of Passage (Epic). Informed this time out by Irish pipes and Gypsy strings, the Girls' acoustic folk-rock tradition of angst-filled, personal and impassioned lyrics - supported by strong-voiced solos and clean harmonies - continues.
NEWS
March 23, 2005 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I reach back to high school, to 1965, and hear my senior English teacher, the vibrant Janet Crimens. She is giving me what every 17-year-old wants, in any form: the go-ahead. "You may do your paper on The Glass Menagerie if you want, that's fine with me," she's saying. "I'm not sure about the rest of Tennessee Williams, but The Glass Menagerie is fine. " Of course, this made me eager to read the rest of Williams, as I'm now certain she knew it would. Up until then, my experience in an audience had been at community plays and Broadway musicals.
NEWS
June 11, 2013
Best Play Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike , Christopher Durang   Best Revival of a Play Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Best Revival of a Musical Pippin Best Book of a Musical Matilda The Musical , Dennis Kelly Best Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics) Kinky Boots, music and lyrics: Cyndi Lauper Actor in a Leading Role/Play Tracy Letts, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
NEWS
May 22, 1994 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Can there be art outside the art structure? The answer used to be, probably not. Our society is so specialized, it has totally relied on the art structure to identify, communicate and preserve art. Isota Tucker Epes (Bryn Mawr College Class of '40), a Virginia Woolf scholar and former English teacher at Shipley School, now living in Virginia, ventured farther afield when she took up painting in retirement eight years ago. She approaches her painting series, "An Essay: Virginia Woolf," at Bryn Mawr College, with a highly sophisticated set of ideas and an almost primitive paint-handling, attempting to stretch definitions in a provocative way, and hoping to force us to reconsider our own relationships to objects, to meaning and to literature.
NEWS
April 30, 1990 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
This is the time of the year when subscription brochures are promising seasons of judiciously selected plays at cut rates for subscribers to our professional theaters. It is a good time to be reminded that the promises are not always kept. Case in point: the final show of the Philadelphia Drama Guild's season. The high quality of the production of A Walk in the Woods at the Annenberg Center may make devotees of the Drama Guild feel better about missing Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Staff Writer
PRINCETON - Is any play more perfectly titled than Edward Albee's A Delicate Balance? The Pulitzer Prize-winning 1966 play, now at the McCarter Theatre through Feb. 27, has well-coiffed suburbanites balancing their composure against chaotic forces within themselves and outside the door. Other balances are needed for a successful rendering of this play. As much as one wishes more of them were achieved in this Emily Mann-directed production, there's still plenty happening with such a rich script wrestled into life by high-caliber actors Kathleen Chalfant and John Glover.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
'Truth and illusion. Who knows the difference, eh, toots?" That question is central to this juicy and monumental play, Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? And, it turns out, we're all of us "toots. " Theatre Exile's production, under Joe Canuso's smart direction, of this iconic American drama is both splendid and funny and wrenching, just as it should be. A highly skilled and subtle quartet of actors makes this happen. It's 2 a.m. A middle-age couple, George (the extraordinary Pearce Bunting)
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
  P EARCE BUNTING , who played the bootlegger Bill McCoy in the hit HBO series "Boardwalk Empire," with Steve Buscemi , has returned to his hometown of Philadelphia to step into a new role. Edward Albee 's 1962 play "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" premieres Wednesday night at the Plays & Players Theatre (1714 Delancey Place), in Rittenhouse Square. Bunting portrays the passive-aggressive George, who gradually loses his patience with his taunting, drunk wife, Martha, after she brings home a younger, married couple who - over the course of several hours of drinking - become enmeshed in George and Martha's domestic disputes.
NEWS
June 11, 2013
Best Play Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike , Christopher Durang   Best Revival of a Play Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Best Revival of a Musical Pippin Best Book of a Musical Matilda The Musical , Dennis Kelly Best Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics) Kinky Boots, music and lyrics: Cyndi Lauper Actor in a Leading Role/Play Tracy Letts, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Staff Writer
PRINCETON - Is any play more perfectly titled than Edward Albee's A Delicate Balance? The Pulitzer Prize-winning 1966 play, now at the McCarter Theatre through Feb. 27, has well-coiffed suburbanites balancing their composure against chaotic forces within themselves and outside the door. Other balances are needed for a successful rendering of this play. As much as one wishes more of them were achieved in this Emily Mann-directed production, there's still plenty happening with such a rich script wrestled into life by high-caliber actors Kathleen Chalfant and John Glover.
NEWS
March 23, 2005 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I reach back to high school, to 1965, and hear my senior English teacher, the vibrant Janet Crimens. She is giving me what every 17-year-old wants, in any form: the go-ahead. "You may do your paper on The Glass Menagerie if you want, that's fine with me," she's saying. "I'm not sure about the rest of Tennessee Williams, but The Glass Menagerie is fine. " Of course, this made me eager to read the rest of Williams, as I'm now certain she knew it would. Up until then, my experience in an audience had been at community plays and Broadway musicals.
NEWS
March 7, 2004 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The challenge of embodying the ideas and thoughts of Virginia Woolf - one of the most influential, innovative authors of the 20th century - in a one-woman play intrigued Marcia Saunders. Using Woolf's essay A Room of One's Own, Saunders portrays the feminist author as she delivered a rousing speech in October 1928 to try to galvanize young female writers to reach their creative potential. A prominent member of the avant-garde literary gathering known as the Bloomsbury Group, the British-born Woolf changed the face of writing, said Saunders, who's spent many hours researching the life and works of the prolific Woolf, a leader of the modernist movement in literature before taking her own life in 1941.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2003 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
"Someone has to die," muses Virginia Woolf, hard at her manuscript in The Hours, "so the rest of us can value life more. " In the broody film based on Michael Cunningham's novel - a triptych in which three people contemplate suicide, two commit it, and one hangs in there - death crashes the party. And doesn't exactly bring life into higher relief. For a film about embracing the living instead of the dead, The Hours has precious little joie de vivre. Hard to believe that Stephen Daldry, who made Billy Elliot, directed this heavy-handed affair.
NEWS
September 12, 1998 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first fall sale at Freeman/Fine Arts of Philadelphia Inc. of books, autographs and ephemera is, as usual, a study in the lore of literature. The more than 900 lots that will be offered beginning at 10 a.m. Thursday provide items of local interest, a glimpse into authentication tactics, and a bellwether of what is commanding good prices. Of local interest, for instance, is an early farm-receipt book maintained by Jane and John Longstreth of Phoenixville. Kept from 1764 to 1811, it records such bits of Philadelphia history as the yellow-fever epidemic of the 1790s and the births of five children from whom the local Longstreths are descended.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1994 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The flamboyant, popular poet-novelist Vita Sackville-West was 30 years old when she met the awkward, critically admired but scarcely prosperous writer Virginia Woolf, 10 years her senior. They were an improbable pair, and they didn't entirely hit it off right away, but their meeting began a friendship and a sometime love affair that lasted two decades until Woolf's suicide in 1941. Excerpting from the women's letters to each other (and occasionally to outsiders), Eileen Atkins chronicles this mutually beneficial relationship in Vita and Virginia, which opened on Monday at the Union Square Theatre.
NEWS
May 22, 1994 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Can there be art outside the art structure? The answer used to be, probably not. Our society is so specialized, it has totally relied on the art structure to identify, communicate and preserve art. Isota Tucker Epes (Bryn Mawr College Class of '40), a Virginia Woolf scholar and former English teacher at Shipley School, now living in Virginia, ventured farther afield when she took up painting in retirement eight years ago. She approaches her painting series, "An Essay: Virginia Woolf," at Bryn Mawr College, with a highly sophisticated set of ideas and an almost primitive paint-handling, attempting to stretch definitions in a provocative way, and hoping to force us to reconsider our own relationships to objects, to meaning and to literature.
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