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Virtual Reality

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BUSINESS
September 17, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
Gray skies, the daily grind, family problems, international crises - the real world has always had its drawbacks. But an easy escape might soon be at hand. Put on a headset and a data-glove and you could jump into a completely different world - a "virtual reality" where the sun always shines and you can live out your fantasies. Known as VR, virtual reality has been on the drawing board for years. Now, thanks to increased computer power and a surge of interest, VR applications are finally making their debut.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1999 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A creepy-crawly excursion into the realms of virtual reality, David Cronenberg's Existenz is sort of The Matrix of the art house - sans the kinetic kung fu, dazzling digital effects, and 22d-century whizbangs. But there is still plenty of icky bug imagery to go around, along with computer cables that hook up to human bodies like umbilical cords. The metaphor of machines as an extension of man (and woman) isn't hard to miss. Set in a bleak, rural world of boxy churches, barns, mutant-trout farms, and hidden laboratories (it would be no surprise to see Dr. Frankenstein's cadaverous creation come lumbering down the road)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1996 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Set in a futuristic Tokyo with a burning chrome skyline, Ghost in the Shell is an eye-popping, mind-bending Japanimation adventure in cyberspace. The plot revolves around a female uber-cyborg, whose circuitry is augmented with voluptuous human flesh. Her mission is to locate a cyber-terrorist known as the Puppet Master, who, like her, eludes detection by the use of therm-optic camouflage. Our heroine refers to her cyber-spirit as her "ghost" and her human casing as her "shell," hence the film's title.
NEWS
October 13, 1995 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Strange Days" represents a new generation of Hollywood movies designed not to entertain but to pulverize. Like this summer's "Batman Returns" and last year's "Natural Born Killers," "Strange Days" combines thumping, synthesized music with a torrent of images, leaving viewers not with a message or a moral, but a migraine. To this list of sins, "Strange Days" adds another - the already hackneyed subject of virtual reality. It's used here as a mechanism to draw the viewer into simulated murder, rape and assault.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | By Sharon O'Neal, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sister Jean Anthony, a professor of music therapy at Immaculata College, believes the field's future is intimately connected not to musical instruments but to computers. Make that computer-generated musical instruments. Sister Jean Anthony and Rebecca T. Mercuri, director of the computer consulting firm Notable Software, have been working for the last year on ways to use cyberspace, the phenomenon of a simulated environment also known as virtual reality, with traditional music therapy techniques.
NEWS
August 18, 2002 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Army Col. Bill Mathers had heard the promises before: vendors swearing that their product was going to revolutionize the way the military operated. Mathers was deputy commander of the Fort Dix battle lab, where he was in charge of finding ways to train through simulation, producing well-prepared soldiers while keeping costs down. So when Peter Rogina marched into his office in 1996 and delivered the goods - a souped-up, dead-on, photo-realistic version of virtual reality and the best imaging he'd ever seen - Mathers was incredulous.
NEWS
June 4, 1991 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
A marriage of television and compact discs has produced a potent new offspring at this year's Summer Consumer Electronics Show. Resembling a plain- Jane CD player but hiding computer-strength smarts and a strong sense of adventure, this new breed of "multimedia" CD player (about $1,000) will run rich new hybrids of "electronic literature" that combine text, graphics, animated cartoons, partial screen video and digital stereo sound. Yes, it sings! It dances! It tells you stories and takes you places you've never been before!
NEWS
October 7, 1998 | by Erin Einhorn, Daily News Staff Writer
It'll be big (at least according to early plans). And it'll be bright. But will it be Disney? Just about everyone, it seems, has started calling the lot at the corner of 8th and Market streets "the Disney site," in hopes that the Mouse himself will grace Philadelphia with his one of his new, virtual reality, Mousified game arcades called DisneyQuest. And yesterday, the city zoning board gave the nod to a Blue Bell developer with plans for the former Gimbel's site that include: along with a 20-screen multiplex, a 30-story hotel, a parking garage, and a gaggle of street-level shops - a five-story "arcade" space that just happens to meet the rodent's very needs.
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
The usual onslaught of spiffy new audio and video products was severly tempered at the Summer Consumer Electronics Show. Many of the big guns of the electronics business - including Sony, Sharp, JVC, Toshiba, Pioneer and Hitachi - skipped the trade show for reasons of timing or cost-saving. As a result, there were only a handful of those "golly gee, never saw that before" gizmos: Most prominent in computer/game land were Sega's wrap-around VR (virtual reality) video glasses that pull you into a 360-degree color game environment (priced under $200)
REAL_ESTATE
December 5, 1999 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Chip Roach's first contact with the "virtual reality house tour" came more than two decades ago, when a salesman arrived at his office armed with an early version of the home video camera. "It was interesting," recalled Roach, cochairman of Prudential Fox & Roach. "The fellow had filmed the interiors and exteriors of almost 80 houses," Roach said. "But that was the problem. There were 80 houses to look at, and you had to fast-forward and rewind just to try to find the one that may have caught your eye. " Roach's comments, made as he returned from the mid-November annual convention of the National Association of Realtors in Orlando, Fla., were inspired by the four-day event's overwhelming emphasis on technology.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 5, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Columnist
  The creatures came to take souls. They were hovering very close, in a virtual reality demo - formally called "Into the Further 4D Virtual Reality Experience" - that opened for scary business over the weekend on Second Street near South. Piggybacking on the South Street Spring Festival, this traveling virtual fun house presentation was sponsored by a major movie studio (Focus Features) and provided a sophisticated/sneaky way to get you interested in its freaky June 5 release, Insidious Chapter 3 . The movie theme is pretty typical - teenage girl is threatened with ghostly creatures craving to feed on her pure, innocent essence.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
IF YOU'VE ever wondered what it might be like inside the mind of the X-Men's Professor X, make like Quicksilver to San Diego for this week's Comic-Con. Twentieth Century Fox has created an "X-Men"-themed interactive digital experience utilizing the Oculus Rift virtual-reality headset, which is not yet available to consumers, to simulate the fictional Cerebro technology used to track down mutants by the character portrayed by Patrick Stewart and James McAvoy in the "X-Men" films.
NEWS
March 4, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not Minority Report ; it's real life. Kind of. If all goes well, Rowan University students next year will be able to wave their hands to interact with an immersive, three-dimensional computer system with large screens wrapping about 270 degrees around them. The as-yet-unnamed system will be able to fit up to 25 people inside a 20-by-20-foot space, surrounded by screens in an immersive, 3D virtual-reality environment with which they can interact. "This is a tool for engineering design.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
What if you could explore and conduct research on the floor of the Grand Canyon, or examine archaeological sites underneath the Vatican, without ever leaving the Philadelphia region? By next fall, those kinds of experiences and many more will be available to students and the broader community inside a virtual-reality enclosure off the lobby of Villanova University's Falvey Library. The project is known as a CAVE, which stands for Cave Automated Virtual Environment. It's being developed under a $1.67 million grant from the National Science Foundation, awarded this year to a team led by computer scientist Frank Klassner.
NEWS
January 9, 2013
AS A long-standing member of Froggy Carr, I want to thank you for bringing our story to the people in Philadelphia. ("Frogs croak rare apology," Stu Bykofsky column, Jan. 7.) As you well know, we only have 100-plus members in the club. What we have done in the last 25 years is allowed others who have no other club affiliation to march with us to enjoy a day in the sun as a Philadelphia Mummer. Without this gesture from the Frogs there would be over 500 "stragglers" (a term of endearment for Mummers without a club affiliation)
NEWS
April 20, 2011 | By KAREN KAPLAN, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - Would you want your surgeon to party hearty the night before you went under his scalpel? Probably not. Yet there are no rules on the amount of alcohol a surgeon may (or may not) consume on the eve of a day in the operating room. This despite the fact that 42 percent of health-care workers acknowledged having a hangover at work, according to a 1993 study. And among doctors, surgeons are known to have a particular fondness for drinking, according to some other studies and the casual observations of many physicians.
NEWS
October 4, 2009 | By Cynthia Henry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Saturated mulch sank two inches when Rowan University graduate student George Lecakes stepped onto the playground at Von Nieda Park in Camden. The stench of sewage rose in the air. "It's one thing for a grassy area to be flooded, but this is a kids' playground," Lecakes, 26, of Haddonfield, said last week during his engineering team's weekly survey of the Cramer Hill neighborhood's failing storm-water system. The students poked clogged drains, photographed houses, and surveyed streets - gathering data to help the university's virtual-reality supercomputer seek remedies to the neighborhood's perpetual water problems.
NEWS
July 21, 2009 | By Matt Flegenheimer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They seem like a pretty motley crew, this Drexel University design team - Jared Weinstock in his flip-flops, quoting Zoolander and expounding on the virtues of the fourth dimension; Kyle McArdle, grass stains on his jeans, downing cheesesteaks at every group meeting; and Nick Deimler, taking potshots from the gang as his ring tone, "Land Down Under," fills the room. "It's my mom," he says sheepishly. But look and listen closer, and the accolades they are receiving start to make sense.
NEWS
June 2, 2009 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The small crew of Villanova students and professors entered the Sistine Chapel at 8 p.m. - after it was closed to the public and everyone but a few workers had left. And for the next three hours, they were allowed to film almost alone and uninterrupted the most well-known chapel in the Vatican, even moving inside the small area where ballots are counted in the election of a new pope - which is normally roped off to the public. "It was perfectly silent. It really was sort of outside of time," said Bryan Crable, chair of Villanova's Communication Department and one of the professors on the project.
NEWS
August 25, 2008 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Think back to when you slipped on the ice or in the shower: the ground rushing up, your feet shooting out, terror building even as your mind is working a mile a second to plot a soft landing. This is what Emily Keshner studies, in a lab designed to mimic all the above. Balance is something most people don't think about unless they're learning to snowboard or walking up the aisle when their plane hits turbulence. Or recovering from a stroke, as more people will be doing in an aging America.
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