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Virtual World

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 21, 1999
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BUSINESS
April 13, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
Many shareholders never bother to attend an annual shareholders meeting, and usually they're not missing much. There are few fireworks. The little interaction that occurs between management and the audience is strictly managed, and often the meeting is over in a matter of minutes. This will be the second year in which companies can opt to hold a virtual annual shareholders meeting rather than the more familiar terrestrial one. But the live webcast version isn't exactly supplanting the traditional event held in hotel conference rooms everywhere.
NEWS
July 9, 2008 | By Carolyn Davis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ariella Furman took her first summer vacation as a college graduate to Walt Disney World, where reality hides behind princesses. When it was over, she returned to Ivyland, Bucks County, and her job making videos - or more accurately, machinimas - for the virtual world Second Life, where reality hides behind avatars. Furman, 21, is among a growing number of people who earn very real money in this real-time Web community. An increasing number of corporations, organizations, schools, even TV shows are hungry to have a presence on Second Life, to tap its participants for their products and programs.
NEWS
June 6, 2010
When the virtual world of the Web just isn't personal enough, get in touch with a real human for travel tips and trip advice on Localyte.com . - Jen Leo, Los Angeles Times
NEWS
June 9, 2013
D EAR ABBY: I host all of the holiday parties and dinner parties for my family. Whenever I have my parents over, my father insists on helping himself to the top layer of every casserole. He'll scrape all the cheese off the potatoes, the crunchy onion topping off the green bean casserole, etc., leaving just the bare vegetables for everyone else. I have asked Dad not to do it because it is inconsiderate of the other guests. I can see people are bothered by it, so now they make a beeline to the buffet so they can beat him to it. Dad got offended when I talked to him about it, but he continues to do it. Mom refuses to get involved, and I have said all I can say. What to do?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1996 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
They are in the great tradition of cosmically clueless comic relief - you know, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, Abbott and Costello, Bill and Ted. But in their feature debut, Beavis and Butt-head Do America, the nation's most revered and reviled commentators are . . . comatose. In this asphalt odyssey, they prove you can take the sofa spuds off the couch but you can't make them cross the road. When a pair of beer-bellied numbskulls steal their television set, Beavis (the pompadoured blond in the Metallica T-shirt)
NEWS
November 8, 2006 | Stephen Miller
Stephen Miller is the author of "Conversation: A History of a Declining Art" A few decades ago, most politicians knew they had to be civil to members of the opposing party in order to legislate, so it was important to forget about the mudslinging that inevitably occurs in an election campaign. Most knew that, as the English political philosopher Michael Oakeshott said, "political education means learning how to participate in a political conversation. " Nowadays, according to many observers, there is very little cross-party conversation going on in Congress.
NEWS
October 20, 2006 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
West Chester lawyer Marc Bragg was amassing a real estate empire, building casinos and a condo development, and buying and selling land as if he were Donald Trump. None of it was exactly real - until it became the subject of a lawsuit he filed this year in Chester County Court. Bragg assembled his properties on Second Life, an online world whose more than one million residents travel, shop, build and even create businesses that generate real U.S.-dollar revenue. Bragg's lawsuit over Second Life's confiscation of several thousand dollars' worth of his virtual property is just the latest evidence of the growing popularity and economic heft of online worlds.
NEWS
November 19, 2004 | By Mary Bissell
The long lines at the voting booths on Nov. 2 were dwarfed by the hoards of gamers who lined up a week later in cities around the country, anxiously awaiting an inaugural copy of the most hotly anticipated video game in American entertainment history. With more than $80 million in expected profits, this shoot-em-up sensation may not change the world, but it could help put the compassion back into conservatism by providing a much-needed financial boost for key domestic programs. From mentoring programs to faith-based initiatives, the Bush administration has introduced a series of well-intentioned social programs designed to keep kids safe from gun violence, abuse and neglect, drugs, and crime.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1998 | By Dennis McCauley, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's New Year's Day. In between the Mummer's Parade, the college bowl games, and the traditional dinner, you're wistfully clicking away on that new, big-ticket home computer that generated so much holiday excitement. While you puzzle over the twin mysteries of the Windows 95 desktop and your stratospheric credit card bill, you realize something's missing. Your warm and fuzzy dream of a shared family computing experience isn't quite working out the way you planned. Like many parents, you've found that you and your kids just don't enjoy the same kinds of software.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 9, 2013
D EAR ABBY: I host all of the holiday parties and dinner parties for my family. Whenever I have my parents over, my father insists on helping himself to the top layer of every casserole. He'll scrape all the cheese off the potatoes, the crunchy onion topping off the green bean casserole, etc., leaving just the bare vegetables for everyone else. I have asked Dad not to do it because it is inconsiderate of the other guests. I can see people are bothered by it, so now they make a beeline to the buffet so they can beat him to it. Dad got offended when I talked to him about it, but he continues to do it. Mom refuses to get involved, and I have said all I can say. What to do?
NEWS
January 19, 2012
After the Wikipedia-driven Internet blackout Wednesday, it's a safe bet that every high school student with an overdue homework assignment is well clued in to the debate over regulating online piracy. The 24-hour shutdown of the English-language version of the do-it-yourself encyclopedia was launched as a protest against pending federal legislation being pushed by Hollywood studios, music labels, cable firms, and traditional media companies. To say the protest went viral would be like characterizing the bubonic plague as a common cold.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
Many shareholders never bother to attend an annual shareholders meeting, and usually they're not missing much. There are few fireworks. The little interaction that occurs between management and the audience is strictly managed, and often the meeting is over in a matter of minutes. This will be the second year in which companies can opt to hold a virtual annual shareholders meeting rather than the more familiar terrestrial one. But the live webcast version isn't exactly supplanting the traditional event held in hotel conference rooms everywhere.
NEWS
June 6, 2010
When the virtual world of the Web just isn't personal enough, get in touch with a real human for travel tips and trip advice on Localyte.com . - Jen Leo, Los Angeles Times
NEWS
July 9, 2008 | By Carolyn Davis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ariella Furman took her first summer vacation as a college graduate to Walt Disney World, where reality hides behind princesses. When it was over, she returned to Ivyland, Bucks County, and her job making videos - or more accurately, machinimas - for the virtual world Second Life, where reality hides behind avatars. Furman, 21, is among a growing number of people who earn very real money in this real-time Web community. An increasing number of corporations, organizations, schools, even TV shows are hungry to have a presence on Second Life, to tap its participants for their products and programs.
NEWS
November 8, 2006 | Stephen Miller
Stephen Miller is the author of "Conversation: A History of a Declining Art" A few decades ago, most politicians knew they had to be civil to members of the opposing party in order to legislate, so it was important to forget about the mudslinging that inevitably occurs in an election campaign. Most knew that, as the English political philosopher Michael Oakeshott said, "political education means learning how to participate in a political conversation. " Nowadays, according to many observers, there is very little cross-party conversation going on in Congress.
NEWS
November 2, 2006 | By Adam Fifield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There are other worlds out there - violent, virtual domains where residents hurl lightning bolts at giant, dog-headed beasts and wield glittering swords during heroic quests that make the real world pale. Online interactive role-playing games such as EverQuest and World of Warcraft draw millions into their byzantine realms and complex social orders. Some become so enthralled that mental-health professionals are seeing patients who play as much as 70 hours a week, neglecting school, work, even marriage.
NEWS
October 20, 2006 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
West Chester lawyer Marc Bragg was amassing a real estate empire, building casinos and a condo development, and buying and selling land as if he were Donald Trump. None of it was exactly real - until it became the subject of a lawsuit he filed this year in Chester County Court. Bragg assembled his properties on Second Life, an online world whose more than one million residents travel, shop, build and even create businesses that generate real U.S.-dollar revenue. Bragg's lawsuit over Second Life's confiscation of several thousand dollars' worth of his virtual property is just the latest evidence of the growing popularity and economic heft of online worlds.
NEWS
November 19, 2004 | By Mary Bissell
The long lines at the voting booths on Nov. 2 were dwarfed by the hoards of gamers who lined up a week later in cities around the country, anxiously awaiting an inaugural copy of the most hotly anticipated video game in American entertainment history. With more than $80 million in expected profits, this shoot-em-up sensation may not change the world, but it could help put the compassion back into conservatism by providing a much-needed financial boost for key domestic programs. From mentoring programs to faith-based initiatives, the Bush administration has introduced a series of well-intentioned social programs designed to keep kids safe from gun violence, abuse and neglect, drugs, and crime.
NEWS
June 13, 2000 | By Lee Drutman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After Superintendent John Gould delivers his remarks at Morrisville High School's graduation tonight, he will not shake any hands, give any hugs, or hand out any diplomas. It will be a "virtual graduation" for Gould. From San Diego, Calif., he will be connected to the ceremony held for 80 graduates and their families through telephone lines and videoconferencing equipment. That way, he said, he will be able to "hammer home the point of what the virtual world is going to look like in the future.
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