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NEWS
May 16, 2013 | By Ian Phillips, Associated Press
PRAGUE - Was he or wasn't he? The video footage shows the new Czech president clearly worse for wear, propping himself up against a wall at a public event, struggling to negotiate a step and being aided by a cardinal. Milos Zeman makes no secret of his drinking. But on this occasion - a rare and highly ceremonial public display of the Czech crown jewels last week - his office insisted he simply had a virus and subsequently needed a day or two of rest. Since then, the video has prompted a storm of social-media gags.
NEWS
December 21, 1986 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Chester County swine farmers are taking precautions so that a highly infectious animal virus centered mainly in Lancaster County does not travel across the county line. Cheryl Fairbairn, Chester County agricultural/livestock agent, said the virus, swine pseudorabies, had "absolutely no effect on pork for human consumption. " The disease affects hogs, and they can transmit it to other animals. "Where it becomes an economic disaster is when it gets into breeding swine herds," Fairbairn said.
NEWS
March 20, 1992 | BY JILL PRESS
I cancelled my CompuServe Membership March 7. I've never used it - or my modem - for lack of interest, fear of virtual reality, whatever. Nonetheless, when I received my monthly bank statement, it showed a $1.87 CompuServe charge on my credit card. Livid, confused, I called and negotiated the (expletive) Press 1, Press 2, Press 3 routine until I was finally connected with a Suzanne. Poor Suzanne, she probably wishes she was still down at her place by the river . . . Apparently, the $25 "credit" I was issued upon joining CompuServe has been used up in monthly service charges.
LIVING
May 31, 1999 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A pervasive but little-known herpesvirus has emerged as the cause of a common childhood disease, a threat to organ transplant patients, and possibly even the trigger for some cases of multiple sclerosis. Human herpesvirus 6, or HHV-6, is a cousin of the notorious organisms that cause chicken pox, genital sores and mouth sores. In recent years, scientists have begun to understand how important the virus may be, according to an article in the current issue of the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.
NEWS
August 4, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
An examination of a bottlenose dolphin that was found dead Sunday in Delaware Bay showed that it died of bronchial pneumonia, but New Jersey environmental officials and experts at a mammal stranding center in Brigantine disagree over whether a virus that precedes the pneumonia is responsible for 85 dolphin deaths along the East Coast this summer. James Staples, a spokesman for the state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), said last night that the virus Pasteurella multocida might have led to the deaths of the dolphins.
SPORTS
March 25, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
Beyond the grave of Tim Richmond lies a trail of pretty women, following him into the ground. Fresh flowers rest beside the tombstone of one former lover. A second ex-girlfriend, still fighting for her life, has picked out her casket. At least two former partners are in seclusion on the East Coast, awaiting the inevitable. And there might be more to come, according to a story published in the Miami Herald yesterday. The Herald reported that Richmond, an auto racing star who died of AIDS seven years ago, infected numerous women with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.
NEWS
February 17, 1988 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
When it strikes, it feels like food poisoning. So you immediately start to review your diet for the past 24 hours. But don't bother. What's been going around for the past few weeks has the symptoms of food poisoning, but it's actually a stomach virus (sometimes called intestinal flu) that lasts two to five days. Bala Cynwyd internist Steven Saris describes the progression of the virus: You're feeling fine. Then, you have this sudden urge to vomit. And you have abdominal cramps.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
You see some weird stuff on the Internet, like the description of Danny Boyle's "28 Days Later" as a "zombie romp. " The movie was anything but a romp. In fact, it was one of the first really good post-9/11 movies to imagine how terror attacks could break containment and morph into something apocalyptic (see also "Children of Men"). Boyle framed it as a genre picture, and avoided obvious commentary. He peeled away politics and boiled everything down to seething anger - his "zombies" were actually living people infected with a "rage virus," a disease (like hate itself)
SPORTS
January 22, 1993 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Jennifer Capriati, taking pills for a stomach virus that had kept her in bed the day before, fought back from the edge of defeat to overcome Florencia Labat of Argentina, 6-7 (8-10), 7-5, 6-2, yesterday in the second round of the Australian Open. The 16-year-old Capriati, who spent Wednesday in bed with a high fever, was worked over a bit by the lefthanded Labat, whose top-spin returns blunted her power game. But the seventh-seeded Capriati, who won the New South Wales Open on Sunday, prevailed in a 2-hour, 17-minute thriller.
NEWS
April 20, 2013
What appears to be a nasty stomach virus has ripped through a Delaware County parochial school. An official at St. Katharine of Siena Elementary School in Wayne said about 120 of its 444 students and about three of its 35 teachers were out sick Thursday. Those who had consulted doctors were told it was a virus. On Tuesday, 12 students were out sick, said the official. By the end of Wednesday, about 120 had either called in sick or been sent home. As of Thursday afternoon, no additional students had been sent home.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly 50 years after the Epstein-Barr virus was discovered to cause human cancers, there are no good treatment options for the 200,000 new cases diagnosed annually, most of them in the world's poorest places. The Wistar Institute aims to change that. The illustrious Philadelphia research center last month received a three-year, $5.6 million grant from the Wellcome Trust in London to continue developing a novel anti-viral drug. "We certainly hope that this first-in-class drug we are developing will slow the progression or - even better - cure these deadly cancers," said Wistar senior scientist Troy Messick.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - An avian virus that has killed more than 47 million birds nationwide and caused an estimated $1 billion in economic losses in just two states is approaching Pennsylvania's borders, a panel of experts told state legislators Wednesday. The highly pathogenic avian influenza virus does not affect humans. But because it can be easily transported - via migrating birds, trucks, even human shoes - state agencies, private companies, and Pennsylvania's 11,000 poultry farmers must be prepared to respond quickly if it is detected within the state, the experts said.
NEWS
May 9, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Public health officials are bracing for a new wave of hepatitis C infections, one unleashed by the epidemic of prescription painkiller addiction. The bloodborne virus, on the decline nationally until a few years ago, is rising rapidly among adolescents and young adults, especially in white, rural communities. These are the same areas where a devastating epidemic of prescription opioid deaths first showed up over a decade ago, followed by a wave of heroin deaths. Most of the new hepatitis C patients have contracted the virus by injecting drugs, often crushed pain pills.
NEWS
January 28, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
This is the time of year when many of us dream of flying south to hang out on a warm beach. Increasingly, though, travelers are coming home with more than a deeper tan and a better mood. Some soon have the high fever and intense joint pain of a virus that's taken our southern neighbors by storm in the last year and has already found a home in Florida. Chikungunya, which can cause weeks of arthritis-like joint pain, has been migrating around the world from East Africa since the late 1950s.
NEWS
November 1, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia imposes a mandatory quarantine three or four times a year for uncooperative people with tuberculosis and is planning to automatically seek a court order as a precaution if a patient is confirmed with Ebola, officials said. The city is monitoring about 40 travelers from West Africa who arrived at five designated airports in other parts of the country. An additional 20 or so, including 11 in Burlington County, are being followed at least daily in surrounding counties in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ, Daily News Staff Writer madejp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
A LACK OF protection from Ebola won't fly for subcontracted airport workers. Employees trying to unionize as well as representatives from SEIU, a labor union that represents more than 1.9 million workers in the U.S. and Canada, gathered at Philadelphia International Airport yesterday to voice concerns about potential exposure to the virus. "We need to replace fear with facts," said Councilman Curtis Jones Jr., who spoke at the event. "This virus doesn't know hierarchy. It doesn't know the CEO from the person doing the cabins in the airplane.
NEWS
October 27, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Practically everyone at the march had a story about people who refused to shake hands or moved to another bus seat when they realized they were near a Liberian. "Once they hear our accent, people try to avoid us," said Harris Murphy, a filmmaker. "Everybody is afraid of you. I'm a West African - not a virus. " On Saturday, he and about 60 members of Philadelphia's Liberian, Guinean, and Sierra Leonean communities took to the streets, staging a noisy, drum-thumping demonstration to call attention to the facts of the deadly Ebola virus, which has killed nearly 5,000 in West Africa.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IT'S GOING VIRAL. Ebola? No . . . at least not here in the United States, where the deadly virus has not spread among the general population. Although Ebola has been - and remains - a major, lethal public-health crisis in West Africa, cases in the U.S. have been limited to the death of a man who contracted the illness in Liberia before returning to Dallas, and now the infection of two hospital workers who treated him. What is going viral, however, is fear itself - what Franklin Roosevelt might have called "nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Be informed. Don't panic. And wash your hands. That was the advice offered to adults and children at the Safe Schools Summit on Wednesday at the Drexelbrook Conference Center in Drexel Hill. For more than a decade, the Safe Schools Summit has convened to discuss strategies for preventing crises and dealing with threats to school safety. This time, members of the Delaware County Ebola and Infectious Disease Task force took the stage to discuss virus prevention strategies. George Avetian, senior medical adviser for Delaware County, said the task force was modeled after the Delaware County Heroin Task Force, which also was represented at the summit.
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
As even the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has acknowledged, Ebola is scary. The deadliness of the virus and its sometimes gruesome symptoms helped make it a focus of news reports and Hollywood treatments decades before the current outbreak, even as actual cases remained relatively limited and remote. Now that the contagion has killed nearly 4,000 West Africans and, in a few cases, reached across the globe, the dread surrounding it has gone from theoretical to actual for much more of the world.
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