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NEWS
May 16, 2013 | By Ian Phillips, Associated Press
PRAGUE - Was he or wasn't he? The video footage shows the new Czech president clearly worse for wear, propping himself up against a wall at a public event, struggling to negotiate a step and being aided by a cardinal. Milos Zeman makes no secret of his drinking. But on this occasion - a rare and highly ceremonial public display of the Czech crown jewels last week - his office insisted he simply had a virus and subsequently needed a day or two of rest. Since then, the video has prompted a storm of social-media gags.
NEWS
December 21, 1986 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Chester County swine farmers are taking precautions so that a highly infectious animal virus centered mainly in Lancaster County does not travel across the county line. Cheryl Fairbairn, Chester County agricultural/livestock agent, said the virus, swine pseudorabies, had "absolutely no effect on pork for human consumption. " The disease affects hogs, and they can transmit it to other animals. "Where it becomes an economic disaster is when it gets into breeding swine herds," Fairbairn said.
NEWS
March 20, 1992 | BY JILL PRESS
I cancelled my CompuServe Membership March 7. I've never used it - or my modem - for lack of interest, fear of virtual reality, whatever. Nonetheless, when I received my monthly bank statement, it showed a $1.87 CompuServe charge on my credit card. Livid, confused, I called and negotiated the (expletive) Press 1, Press 2, Press 3 routine until I was finally connected with a Suzanne. Poor Suzanne, she probably wishes she was still down at her place by the river . . . Apparently, the $25 "credit" I was issued upon joining CompuServe has been used up in monthly service charges.
LIVING
May 31, 1999 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A pervasive but little-known herpesvirus has emerged as the cause of a common childhood disease, a threat to organ transplant patients, and possibly even the trigger for some cases of multiple sclerosis. Human herpesvirus 6, or HHV-6, is a cousin of the notorious organisms that cause chicken pox, genital sores and mouth sores. In recent years, scientists have begun to understand how important the virus may be, according to an article in the current issue of the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.
NEWS
August 4, 1987 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
An examination of a bottlenose dolphin that was found dead Sunday in Delaware Bay showed that it died of bronchial pneumonia, but New Jersey environmental officials and experts at a mammal stranding center in Brigantine disagree over whether a virus that precedes the pneumonia is responsible for 85 dolphin deaths along the East Coast this summer. James Staples, a spokesman for the state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), said last night that the virus Pasteurella multocida might have led to the deaths of the dolphins.
SPORTS
March 25, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
Beyond the grave of Tim Richmond lies a trail of pretty women, following him into the ground. Fresh flowers rest beside the tombstone of one former lover. A second ex-girlfriend, still fighting for her life, has picked out her casket. At least two former partners are in seclusion on the East Coast, awaiting the inevitable. And there might be more to come, according to a story published in the Miami Herald yesterday. The Herald reported that Richmond, an auto racing star who died of AIDS seven years ago, infected numerous women with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.
NEWS
February 17, 1988 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
When it strikes, it feels like food poisoning. So you immediately start to review your diet for the past 24 hours. But don't bother. What's been going around for the past few weeks has the symptoms of food poisoning, but it's actually a stomach virus (sometimes called intestinal flu) that lasts two to five days. Bala Cynwyd internist Steven Saris describes the progression of the virus: You're feeling fine. Then, you have this sudden urge to vomit. And you have abdominal cramps.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
You see some weird stuff on the Internet, like the description of Danny Boyle's "28 Days Later" as a "zombie romp. " The movie was anything but a romp. In fact, it was one of the first really good post-9/11 movies to imagine how terror attacks could break containment and morph into something apocalyptic (see also "Children of Men"). Boyle framed it as a genre picture, and avoided obvious commentary. He peeled away politics and boiled everything down to seething anger - his "zombies" were actually living people infected with a "rage virus," a disease (like hate itself)
SPORTS
January 22, 1993 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Jennifer Capriati, taking pills for a stomach virus that had kept her in bed the day before, fought back from the edge of defeat to overcome Florencia Labat of Argentina, 6-7 (8-10), 7-5, 6-2, yesterday in the second round of the Australian Open. The 16-year-old Capriati, who spent Wednesday in bed with a high fever, was worked over a bit by the lefthanded Labat, whose top-spin returns blunted her power game. But the seventh-seeded Capriati, who won the New South Wales Open on Sunday, prevailed in a 2-hour, 17-minute thriller.
NEWS
February 11, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin and Robert Moran, STAFF WRITERS
Pennsylvania and Delaware health officials Tuesday confirmed their first cases of the Zika virus. Two women in Pennsylvania who recently traveled to countries affected by the virus tested positive. "They were very, very mild cases: fever, rash, no complications," state Health Secretary Karen Murphy said in a conference call with reporters. She declined to say whether the women were pregnant. Health officials' prime concern about the virus has been reports of a small percentage of babies born with abnormally small heads to women who were infected while pregnant in Brazil, the center of the epidemic in the Americas.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | Erik Polan, D.O., For The Inquirer
Q. How can I protect myself and my family from Zika and other mosquito-borne illnesses? A. The Zika virus has reached U.S. shores with numerous cases reported in a neighborhood in Miami. Many people who contract the disease never show symptoms (which are generally mild and can include fever, rash and joint aches and pains), but when symptoms do appear, they usually resolve themselves. Zika's greatest threat is to pregnant women; the disease can cause serious birth defects in babies whose mothers were infected during pregnancy.
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
The first volunteer has received a dose of Inovio Pharmaceuticals' experimental vaccine to combat the Zika virus, the Plymouth meeting biotech company said Tuesday. Inovio is developing its Zika vaccine with partner GeneOne Life Science in South Korea. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Health Canada's Health Products and Food Branch have approved early-stage tests in 40 healthy adults, the company said. The tests will be done in Philadelphia, Miami, and Quebec City, and will evaluate safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of the vaccine against the mosquito-borne virus.
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
A Camden County man has become the first confirmed case of West Nile virus in New Jersey this year. The state Department of Health said the 48-year-old man began showing symptoms July 8 and is now hospitalized. Pennsylvania has also reported one case of the mosquito-borne virus so far, in a woman from Indiana County. Last year, there were 26 West Nile cases in New Jersey, including three deaths. Until the Camden County case, the disease had only been detected in mosquitos in Atlantic and Monmouth Counties, according to the department.
NEWS
June 30, 2016
By Abigail Aiken and Catherine Aiken The international scientific community has mobilized in response to the Zika virus outbreak, racing to find ways to contain the emerging pandemic and grappling with understanding the health risks posed by the virus. However, the day-to-day reality of the Zika threat for women living in affected areas has not prompted similar attention or action. Despite advising women to delay or avoid pregnancy, the World Health Organization and the governments of affected Latin American countries have remained silent about the options that should be available to women who are already pregnant or who will be unable to avoid pregnancy.
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
A woman who had traveled to the Dominican Republic has become Chester County's first confirmed case of the Zika virus, county officials said Tuesday. She is one of at least 23 confirmed cases of Zika in Pennsylvania, according to the Chester County Health Department. All cases involved travel to areas affected by the virus, which is believed to cause birth defects. The Chester County woman, who is not pregnant, was not hospitalized and has recovered. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention notified the Health Department of the case Monday.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
The first testing in people of an experimental vaccine to combat the Zika virus will begin in the next several weeks, a Philadelphia-area biotech company announced Monday. Inovio Pharmaceuticals in Plymouth Meeting and partner GeneOne Life Science in South Korea said the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has given approval to begin early-stage tests in 40 healthy adults. Shares of Inovio rose 6.97 percent, or 73 cents, to $11.20 after the announcement. The tests will be done at three U.S. locations, including Philadelphia, and will evaluate safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of the vaccine against the mosquito-borne virus.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2016 | By Joel Naroff
When is financial responsibility irresponsible? When Congress is involved, of course. Nothing shows that more clearly than the failure to pass Zika virus research and prevention legislation. Almost one year after Brazil reported that the Zika virus could cause a number of dangerous illnesses, we are still waiting for Congress to do something, and it isn't because a bill would break the bank. The money is there, but some believe it's more important to get the money from other places than to do the right and needed thing in a timely manner.
NEWS
June 8, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
THE CRIME is so new, the FBI doesn't really know how bad it is, but it knows ransomware extortion is a bad and growing threat. Ransomware is the umbrella name for different cybercrime viruses that kidnap your computer and hold it for ransom. The computer never leaves your home or business, but one type of virus freezes it, while another encrypts your files so you can't access them. Attacks are often accompanied by official-looking "notifications" on the monitor screen. In each case, the criminal hackers promise to release your computer in exchange for payment, which is ransom.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2016
279 Pregnant women with confirmed or suspected Zika virus infections in the U.S. and its territories 157 Women in 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia who are part of the 279 total $1.9B The amount President Obama wants from Congress for vaccine development, diagnostic tests, and methods for killing mosquitoes that carry the virus SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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