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ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2011
WHAT YOU NEED TO GET A VISA _ Passport. _ Completed application. _ Passport-size photos. _ Payment for the visa and the expediter processing fee. _ In some cases, a letter from your sponsor or trip-provider, plus a contact in-country. _ In some cases, a copy of your airline ticket, cruise ticket or itinerary. _ In some cases, a driver's license, birth certificate or bank statement. WHAT IS A VISA EXPEDITER? Many tour operators obtain visas for their clients.
NEWS
June 9, 2011
Sometimes, good ideas seem so simple. Like a suggestion from hospitality-industry executive Bill Marriott Jr. that could put thousands of people to work, many in jobs that won't require a college degree. Writing in the June 13 Fortune magazine, Marriott proposes making it easier and faster to get a tourist visa to visit the United States. According to the Commerce Department, a 10 percent increase in international visits would create 100,000 jobs. New rules that came into effect after 9/11 require residents of some countries, including Brazil, Russia, India, and China, to be interviewed in person at a U.S. consulate to obtain a tourist visa.
NEWS
May 5, 1989 | By TRUDY RUBIN
These days you can find out what's going on in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe just by trying to get there. For some weeks now, I've been planning a trip to Moscow, Budapest, Prague and Warsaw. Getting visas for East Bloc countries has always been a drag. The Soviets are notorious for stretching out the process until the last possible minute. Last year a colleague had to bang on the door of the Soviet embassy in London on a Saturday stopover to pick up the visa that Moscow had failed to wire to Washington - even though he had applied the standard six weeks in advance.
NEWS
December 28, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
If you're headed for the French Caribbean, you'll want to know that it's not necessary to get your visa before departure. You can get a free visa stamp upon arrival on the islands of Martinique, Guadeloupe, St. Barthelemy (St. Barts) and the French side of St. Martin-St. Maarten. Before the ruling went into effect Oct. 22, travelers had to get a visa before departure. The new ruling applies to U.S., Canadian and Japanese citizens. Upon arrival in the French West Indies, these citizens will be issued a control visa if they have a valid passport (or one expired within five years)
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
GOODBYE, VISAS. Starting on July 1, U.S. tourists will not need visas to travel in France. The nations reached agreement recently to end the mutual visa requirement for those visiting for less than three months. France was the only nation in Western Europe with such a requirement, imposed in September 1986 after a wave of terrorist bombings in Paris. THE BET'S OFF. What's the top overnight summer tourist destination down the shore? If you placed any bets, you're probably wrong.
NEWS
December 5, 1987 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine you are the head of one of the world's two superpowers and you are planning a trip to the other. Tickets? Got your own plane. Luggage? Packed and X-rayed. Room reservations? The embassy is at your disposal. Passport with American visa? No, sir. Get in line. A rather dogeared green Soviet passport was returned yesterday by the U.S. Embassy in Moscow to its owner, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, after being approved for a special A-1 U.S. visa. Another passport from his wife, Raisa, was being processed by the consular department at the embassy.
NEWS
July 9, 2002 | By Cassio Furtado and Warren P. Strobel INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A Jordanian citizen who FBI officials say lived last summer with two men who later were among the hijackers on Sept. 11 will remain in federal custody, a federal magistrate said yesterday. Rasmi Al-Shannaq, 27, shared a northern Virginia apartment with the two after entering the United States using a phony visa provided by U.S. Embassy personnel in Qatar, according to court papers presented yesterday. The possibility that embassy personnel in Qatar supplied false papers to hijackers or their allies is under investigation, a U.S. official said on condition of anonymity.
NEWS
February 3, 1996
The United States is becoming embroiled in the escalating dispute between China and Taiwan in a way that threatens to make tensions in the area even more dangerous. Rather than calming down the situation, Washington may have made it worse. And once again, the culprit is a visa. On Wednesday, the United States decided to give Taiwanese Vice President Li Yuan-zu a visa to travel through the United States on his way to and from the inauguration of the new Haitian president. Mr. Li's trip, with stopovers in San Francisco, Miami and Los Angeles, is due to start today.
NEWS
November 16, 1986 | By Stephen Birnbaum, Special to The Inquirer
I know that because of the terrorist bombings in Paris, American citizens need a visa to get into France. Does the same apply to the French islands of Martinique and Guadeloupe? I have not been able to find out. It has been difficult to get clear-cut information because the French government, the airlines and the islands were following their own set of rules, none of which seemed to conform. However, toward the end of October, France relaxed its original position; the official word is that American citizens can enter the French West Indies without a visa.
NEWS
November 29, 1988
In denying PLO chief Yasir Arafat a visa to enter New York City to address the United Nations, Secretary of State George Shultz has let his emotions get the better of his good sense. Mr. Shultz' rationale for his action, which caused sharp divisions within the State Department, was that Mr. Arafat has condoned terrorism. Mr. Shultz abhors terrorism. So do we all. But lots of unsavory characters can be found in the corridors of the United Nations and the U.S. has accepted their presence as part of its U.N. obligation.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Christine Flowers
NORMALLY, I'm no fan of the silly-season stuff, and you know exactly what I'm talking about. I'd rather know what a political candidate thinks about the federal debt than whether his wife is a looker. I'd rather have some understanding of what another candidate will do to lower the unemployment rate than whether her husband is still playing around on the side. These are the somewhat boring, yet nonetheless crucial issues that face us in an election year. Still, the silly stuff is amusing, and if you're having a particularly long and stressful day, it's enjoyable to plunge into the sticky, sordid little pool of sound bites and non-news.
NEWS
June 29, 2016
ISSUE | IMMIGRATION U.S. owes visas to Afghan interpreters Congress and Sen. Mike Lee (R., Utah) in particular should be ashamed. It is a disgrace and breach of a sacred trust to renege on our commitment to provide visas to Afghan interpreters and other aides who risked their lives and face retribution daily for their cooperation with our troops and other personnel. I urge Sens. Jeanne Shaheen (D., N.H.) and John McCain (R., Ariz) to introduce a stand-alone bill to renew and scale up the State Department's Special Immigrant Visas program.
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Michael Smerconish
Katherine gets nervous thinking about the imminent decision of the Supreme Court in United States v. Texas . The case will determine the fate of President Obama's executive actions regarding immigration - and Katherine's legal status. In the absence of a replacement for Justice Antonin Scalia, the case could easily divide the court's liberals and conservatives, 4-4, jeopardizing Katherine and four million others in their own, unique immigration entanglements. Katherine was born in the Philippines in 1979.
NEWS
December 25, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Just three months ago, the world was shocked by heart-wrenching photos of a 3-year boy who drowned and was found face down in the surf on a Turkish beach. The images of his lifeless, innocent body pricked the world's conscience and prompted widespread calls to do more to help those fleeing the widespread violence engulfing Syria and other countries. Then came the massacres committed by Islamic jihadists in Paris and San Bernardino. Empathy evaporated, and voices clamored to shut our nation's door to those fleeing massacres and brutality in the Middle East.
NEWS
December 21, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Several years ago, a Bucks County woman wanted to bring her Afghan fiancé to America so they could wed. He had worked as a translator for U.S. troops; she was a soldier when they met in Kabul. The U.S. government "did background checks on him ad infinitum," said Djung Tran, the Philadelphia immigration lawyer who represented the couple in their bid for a K-1 fiancé visa. Month after month, there was no movement on the matter, Tran said. Whenever she inquired, she was told cryptically that it was in "administrative processing," which the lawyer came to conclude was code for "security issues.
NEWS
July 31, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thanh Van Nguyen said he served in South Vietnam's navy and risked his life for U.S. troops before escaping in April 1975, a day before Saigon fell to the communist North Vietnamese. Now 62 and a naturalized citizen, the print shop supervisor and his wife, Gai Thi Tran, 63, live comfortably in East Norriton, Montgomery County. And this summer, the couple had two reasons to celebrate: Their sons were getting married, one in New Jersey, the other in California. But with the hectic joy has come an unexpected and confounding sadness that's unique to foreign-born citizens: the decision by U.S. officials that some relatives may attend while others may not. For Nguyen, the relatives in question were his brother and brother-in-law - nearly identical in age and status, with jobs, children, and deep roots in Vietnam.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Back in 2013, a Wharton School student group provoked indignation in India by uninviting then-Gujarat state official Narendra Modi to address its yearly Wharton India Economic Forum . At the time, the State Department was still reviewing Modi's role in Hindu-Muslim violence a decade earlier. Indian courts exonerated Modi, but he still could not get a visa to come here - or permission to address students by satellite. The Wharton students' uninvite provoked some big Indian companies to disinvite themselves from that year's India Forum, embarrassing the school as it recruited vigorously for students and corporate partners in the world's largest democracy.
NEWS
December 23, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - It was a strange experience for Jim Gerlach: After more than 20 years in public office, he was sitting out an election. Gerlach, a Chester County Republican, had decided to leave office after a decade in the state legislature and 12 years in Congress - making for some odd feelings as he saw campaigns ramp up last fall without him. Gerlach, 59, is one of three local members of Congress who leave office Jan. 3. He, Jon Runyan (R.,...
NEWS
November 28, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
In Thanksgiving Day columns past, I've written of my gratitude to this country for taking in my immigrant grandparents, and my belief that immigration makes this country great. This year I'm thinking about a special group of would-be immigrants - a group whom the United States should be welcoming with thanks, but is instead treating shamefully. I'm referring to thousands of Iraqis who helped American soldiers and civilians during the last decade, for which they've been threatened with death by Shiite militias, and now by ISIS militants.
SPORTS
October 23, 2014 | By Kate Harman, For The Inquirer
It took Phelps School soccer player Alvin Dahn eight hours to get from his hometown of Yekepa, Liberia to Monrovia, the capital of the West African country. The 16-year-old was careful to protect himself once he got to the city, because of the Ebola outbreak. He was wary of strangers, put plastic bags around his arms, applied hand sanitizer often, and washed his hands whenever possible. Dahn had made that trip frequently over a few months, as he had to travel to Monrovia almost every week.
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