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Visual Arts

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NEWS
September 23, 1990 | By Judy Baehr and Bryon Kurzenabe, Special to The Inquirer
Althea Leonard said the new job she started Monday has her "doing what I've always wanted to do. " The West Collingswood resident, 37, was recently appointed associate curator for education at the Stedman Art Gallery at Rutgers University's Camden campus. She is responsible for developing and conducting the gallery's Museum Education Enrichment Program for children and adolescents. She also will produce educational programs for adults. In its fourth year, the enrichment program strives to instill in participants a greater understanding of and appreciation for the visual arts.
NEWS
November 7, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Sylvie Patry, chief curator of impressionist and post-impressionist painting at the Musée d'Orsay in Paris, has been named chief curator and deputy director of collections and exhibitions at the Barnes Foundation, officials announced Thursday. Her appointment - she will assume her duties in January - comes as the foundation on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway is poised to roll out an expansive plan embracing multiple ways of thinking about art, teaching art, and bringing art to the broader community.
NEWS
February 1, 1997 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The Cheltenham Center for the Arts, among the region's vibrant community arts centers, is in danger of shutting down. Its board of governors will meet Monday to decide whether the financially troubled 57-year-old visual arts and professional theater organization can continue operating. Gerard Brown, interim director of the center, said the organization has "chronic financial problems that have become really acute. " He would not say exactly what the center's deficit is, but he described it as "a very large number.
NEWS
December 10, 1990 | By Tom Torok, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ellen Forman, a vibrant dancer, choreographer and teacher who was a pioneer in a dance form that blended language and visual arts, was struck by a car and killed Friday while crossing a street in Pittsburgh. She was 45. Mrs. Forman, of Roxborough, a co-founder of the South Street Dance Company in Philadelphia, was in Pittsburgh directing one of her pieces, "Duet," for a dance company there. She was struck by the car after a post-rehearsal dinner. She trained in English and dance in college and, as her dance career progressed, she continued to break ground in dance by incorporating her literary skills into her performances.
NEWS
December 10, 1991 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Maritime Museum's bid to gain control of the Port of History Museum at Penn's Landing passed a major hurdle yesterday when a bill to lease it to the Maritime for 83 years cleared a City Council committee hearing. The fate of the waterfront facility - which in recent years has been used by more than 300 civic and cultural organizations, and has been used for free by the city - could be determined Dec. 19, when the full council is scheduled to vote. Some arts groups say they will push to have the vote tabled.
NEWS
May 12, 1994 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A playwright-poet, a saxophonist-composer and two founders of Philadelphia art galleries were expected to receive the Mayor's Arts and Culture Award last night at the Barclay Hotel on Rittenhouse Square. The winners, each of whom gets a $5,000 check and a personalized gold medal, are: Ntozake Shange, recipient of the award for literary achievements, wrote for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf, a hit of the 1976-'77 Broadway season that won the Golden Apple and Outer Critics Circle awards and was nominated for Obie, Tony, Grammy and Emmy awards.
SPORTS
December 22, 1999 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
O'Neil Scott, a hard-hitting defensive back for Woodrow Wilson, said yesterday that he had made an oral commitment to Syracuse University. Scott, a 6-foot-1, 175-pounder, made his decision Sunday, choosing Syracuse over Rutgers, West Virginia and Wisconsin. He had made official visits to all four schools. "I chose Syracuse because I like the arts program," Scott said. "I'd like to major in visual arts, and I also thought they had a great football facility. " Scott attends the Charles E. Brimm Medical Arts School in Camden and has a 3.1 grade point average.
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | By Will Thompson, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Community Arts Center in Wallingford opened its doors 40 years ago, it had a special interest in teaching children fine art and crafts. Now, the nonprofit organization at 414 Plush Mill Rd. has an annual operating budget of about $350,000 and has become the largest arts community center in Delaware County. That growth has been particularly evident during the last decade. The center has expanded its agenda to include workshops and programs in the performing and visual arts for all age groups.
NEWS
October 25, 2007 | By Helen I. Hwang FOR THE INQUIRER
Though sitting only 75 feet away from each other on Art School Road in Chester Springs, Historic Yellow Springs and Chester Springs Studio are no longer separated. The two nonprofits officially merged into one organization on Oct. 12. Rob Lukens, executive director of Historic Yellow Springs, said the organizations decided to join "to expand programming and cultural offerings, while also improving the experience of visiting the village. " Since 1975, Historic Yellow Springs has dedicated itself to preserving the history, culture, and environment of the 142-acre enclave in West Pikeland Township.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Area residents who would like to spend their summer in more creative pursuits than watching television and mowing the lawn can sign up for a variety of classes being offered at area art centers. Offerings range from outer-space art to ballet, and are available for all ages. Courses for young children, teenagers and adults begin next week at the Markeim Art Center at Lincoln Avenue and Walnut Street in Haddonfield. Classes at the center are divided into age groups: For children age 12 and under, the offerings include preschool crafts, cooking and crafts, clay, outer-space art, fashion accessories, charm and modeling, and sculpture.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
Niger Ali is writing a script for a kids' TV show. About physics. "The basis of everything," the Freedom Prep High School freshman explains, "is physics. " Ali, 14, has a chance to write, produce, and host the show of his dreams because of the Institute for Development of Education in the Arts, or IDEA. The nonprofit organization offers classes in the 130-seat "black box" theater complex - "we call it the IDEA Performing Arts Center," president Cynthia Primas says - at the BB&T Pavilion on the Camden waterfront.
NEWS
December 3, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Often in the vanguard of evolving developments in recording, the Philadelphia Orchestra was part of the Google Cultural Institute's performing-arts rollout Tuesday, which involved a 60-institution partnership representing more than 20 countries and also including one of Philadelphia's Renaissance bands, Piffaro. The orchestra is represented by a short 360-degree video of Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducting Grieg's "In the Hall of the Mountain King" from Peer Gynt before a live audience at Carnegie Hall.
NEWS
November 7, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Sylvie Patry, chief curator of impressionist and post-impressionist painting at the Musée d'Orsay in Paris, has been named chief curator and deputy director of collections and exhibitions at the Barnes Foundation, officials announced Thursday. Her appointment - she will assume her duties in January - comes as the foundation on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway is poised to roll out an expansive plan embracing multiple ways of thinking about art, teaching art, and bringing art to the broader community.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
If you want Tori Amos - an artist renowned for her smart, passionate lyrics and melodic abandon - to talk about how she does her art, she'll chat your ear off. "I can talk process all day," she says. Good. Amos is someone who's been willing to risk her long-held position in the charts with classically inspired song cycles ( Night of Hunters ), orchestral deconstructions of her best-loved songs (Gold Dust ), sumptuous, twinkly musical theater pieces ( The Light Princess )
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2013
Art Museums & Institutions African American Heritage Museum 661 Jackson Rd., Newtonville, NJ; 609-704-5495. www.aahmsnj.org . Tue.-Fri. 10 am-3 pm. The Barnes Foundation - Philadelphia 2025 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.; 215-278-7000. www.barnesfoundation.org . Ellsworth Kelly: Sculpture on the Wall. $18; $15 seniors 65 and over; $10 students and children 17 and under. Sat.-Mon., Wed.-Thu. 9:30 am-6 pm; Fri. 9:30 am-10 pm. Brandywine River Museum Rte. 1 & Rte. 100, Chadds Ford; 610-388-2700.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | BY ANDREW EISER, Daily News Staff Writer eisera@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
TWO PROPOSALS have moved to the next round in the efforts to rejuvenate the Avenue of the Arts along South Broad Street. Bohlin Cywinski Jackson and Jonathan Alderson Landscape Architects will present their refined visions for the area early next year to the Avenue of the Arts, Inc. The winning plan will then be selected and be featured at the 2013 Philadelphia Flower Show. It will ultimately be used as a guide to help build the future of the iconic strip. The Daily News spoke with Jeff Lew, senior associate and architect at Bohlin Cywinski Jackson: Q: How is the design planned to appear?
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | BY AMANDA V. WAGNER, For the Daily News
FORCED FROM THEIR country, my Cuban grandparents cut ties with their homeland and adjusted to life in United States as immigrants. Blending in became a means of survival for my family. A generation later, Americans are more likely to celebrate than hide or abandon their heritage. A diverse representation of Latino artists' work is on display at "Diálogo 365: Carpe Diem," the fourth annual "Dialogo 365" and the largest Latino contemporary art exhibition in Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
You expect to see oils and pastels, gouaches and the works of the great masters with cutting-edge modern artists at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. But tango performances? Full-scale dance parties? With cocktails to boot? And full-scale dance parties as homage to photographer Zoe Strauss, with hot live music? Three of them this winter alone? An exhibition of Strauss' much-heralded stark and gritty works opens at the museum Jan. 14. And to celebrate Strauss' Philadelphia roots, the museum will sponsor dancing not in the streets, but in its grand interior.
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