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Visual Arts

NEWS
October 25, 2007 | By Helen I. Hwang FOR THE INQUIRER
Though sitting only 75 feet away from each other on Art School Road in Chester Springs, Historic Yellow Springs and Chester Springs Studio are no longer separated. The two nonprofits officially merged into one organization on Oct. 12. Rob Lukens, executive director of Historic Yellow Springs, said the organizations decided to join "to expand programming and cultural offerings, while also improving the experience of visiting the village. " Since 1975, Historic Yellow Springs has dedicated itself to preserving the history, culture, and environment of the 142-acre enclave in West Pikeland Township.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Area residents who would like to spend their summer in more creative pursuits than watching television and mowing the lawn can sign up for a variety of classes being offered at area art centers. Offerings range from outer-space art to ballet, and are available for all ages. Courses for young children, teenagers and adults begin next week at the Markeim Art Center at Lincoln Avenue and Walnut Street in Haddonfield. Classes at the center are divided into age groups: For children age 12 and under, the offerings include preschool crafts, cooking and crafts, clay, outer-space art, fashion accessories, charm and modeling, and sculpture.
LIVING
May 7, 1998 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Steven K. Urice, director of the Rosenbach Museum and Library, will leave that job to become a program officer in the culture department of the Pew Charitable Trusts. Urice, 48, has headed the Rosenbach since 1993. At Pew he will concentrate on revamping the culture department's national grant-making activities. Pew's culture program, which plans to give away $21 million in 1998, has spent the last several years remaking its policies. Locally, the criteria by which it awards grants have become more strict.
NEWS
April 18, 1991 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
Some of the performers had opening-night jitters, but not necessarily Beth Alexander. Beth, 14, a Gordon Middle School student, was chewing gum when she found out that she would be first on stage on opening night of the Chester County Youth Expo. She was to read her original poem on unrequited love. "You will take your gum out of your mouth, won't you?" asked mother Charlotte Curtain. "Oh, sure," said Beth. Was she nervous? "Well, I have been in plays at West Chester & Barley Sheaf Players (in Lionville)
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
The Philadelphia Art Alliance, which closed in January because of financial problems, is back in business with a new look and a different way of doing business, at least for the visual arts. The galleries have a cleaner, more organized look that's also friendlier and more conducive to spending time with art, thanks to the installation of chairs and sofas. The inaugural exhibition, on the other hand, more directly expresses how the Art Alliance intends to show art. In recent years, the organization's visual arts program has been incoherent and inconsistent.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It boasts more than 100 events in eight weeks - from arias to puppet shows, from readings from a book by Pearl S. Buck to readings from a book by Dr. Seuss, from the art of George W. Sotter to the artistic hand of interior designers. Aptly named Bucks Fever '93, it is with a feverish pace that this festival will celebrate the county's visual arts, performing arts, and history. Coordinated by the Central Bucks Chamber of Commerce, Bucks Fever '93 involves about 70 organizations and receives financial support from the business members of the chamber.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1997 | By Edward Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The Gallery Guide and Art Matters, two familiar publications that report on local art happenings, now have some virtual competition. It's Philadelphia Art World, which its proprietors describe as a "monthly online magazine of the visual arts. " Call up http://www.philly-art-world.com on your computer and see for yourself. The proprietors and sole employees of this just-off-the-ground enterprise are Larry Withers and Betty Bisaccia, both of whom work at Widener University in Chester.
NEWS
April 13, 1993 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Board of Education has hired an architectural firm to convert the Ridgway Library on South Broad Street into a state-of-the-art High School for Creative and Performing Arts. The project, which will be designed by Kise, Franks & Straw, is expected to cost $19.2 million. The financially strapped school district, facing a $60 million operating deficit next year, has committed $5.2 million in capital funds, with $6 million to come from the state, $3 million from the city and $5 million from the private sector.
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Abington Art Center doesn't want to be known as an elitist arts organization. So it is encouraging an open dialogue among members of the community, artists, arts administrators and township officials. The value of arts in the community will be the focus of a town meeting Saturday that will coincide with the opening of the center's Artists' Cultural Exchange exhibit. Speakers will be Nancy Allbaugh, director of curriculum for the Abington School District; Township Commissioner Donald W. DeVore; the cultural exchange's vice president, Elizabeth A. Kinzie; Darrell Painter, executive director of the Eastern Montgomery County Chamber of Commerce, and Philip Horn, executive director of the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts.
NEWS
December 3, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Often in the vanguard of evolving developments in recording, the Philadelphia Orchestra was part of the Google Cultural Institute's performing-arts rollout Tuesday, which involved a 60-institution partnership representing more than 20 countries and also including one of Philadelphia's Renaissance bands, Piffaro. The orchestra is represented by a short 360-degree video of Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducting Grieg's "In the Hall of the Mountain King" from Peer Gynt before a live audience at Carnegie Hall.
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