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Visual Arts

LIVING
May 7, 1998 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Steven K. Urice, director of the Rosenbach Museum and Library, will leave that job to become a program officer in the culture department of the Pew Charitable Trusts. Urice, 48, has headed the Rosenbach since 1993. At Pew he will concentrate on revamping the culture department's national grant-making activities. Pew's culture program, which plans to give away $21 million in 1998, has spent the last several years remaking its policies. Locally, the criteria by which it awards grants have become more strict.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | BY ANDREW EISER, Daily News Staff Writer eisera@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
TWO PROPOSALS have moved to the next round in the efforts to rejuvenate the Avenue of the Arts along South Broad Street. Bohlin Cywinski Jackson and Jonathan Alderson Landscape Architects will present their refined visions for the area early next year to the Avenue of the Arts, Inc. The winning plan will then be selected and be featured at the 2013 Philadelphia Flower Show. It will ultimately be used as a guide to help build the future of the iconic strip. The Daily News spoke with Jeff Lew, senior associate and architect at Bohlin Cywinski Jackson: Q: How is the design planned to appear?
NEWS
April 18, 1991 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
Some of the performers had opening-night jitters, but not necessarily Beth Alexander. Beth, 14, a Gordon Middle School student, was chewing gum when she found out that she would be first on stage on opening night of the Chester County Youth Expo. She was to read her original poem on unrequited love. "You will take your gum out of your mouth, won't you?" asked mother Charlotte Curtain. "Oh, sure," said Beth. Was she nervous? "Well, I have been in plays at West Chester & Barley Sheaf Players (in Lionville)
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
The Philadelphia Art Alliance, which closed in January because of financial problems, is back in business with a new look and a different way of doing business, at least for the visual arts. The galleries have a cleaner, more organized look that's also friendlier and more conducive to spending time with art, thanks to the installation of chairs and sofas. The inaugural exhibition, on the other hand, more directly expresses how the Art Alliance intends to show art. In recent years, the organization's visual arts program has been incoherent and inconsistent.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It boasts more than 100 events in eight weeks - from arias to puppet shows, from readings from a book by Pearl S. Buck to readings from a book by Dr. Seuss, from the art of George W. Sotter to the artistic hand of interior designers. Aptly named Bucks Fever '93, it is with a feverish pace that this festival will celebrate the county's visual arts, performing arts, and history. Coordinated by the Central Bucks Chamber of Commerce, Bucks Fever '93 involves about 70 organizations and receives financial support from the business members of the chamber.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1997 | By Edward Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The Gallery Guide and Art Matters, two familiar publications that report on local art happenings, now have some virtual competition. It's Philadelphia Art World, which its proprietors describe as a "monthly online magazine of the visual arts. " Call up http://www.philly-art-world.com on your computer and see for yourself. The proprietors and sole employees of this just-off-the-ground enterprise are Larry Withers and Betty Bisaccia, both of whom work at Widener University in Chester.
NEWS
April 13, 1993 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Board of Education has hired an architectural firm to convert the Ridgway Library on South Broad Street into a state-of-the-art High School for Creative and Performing Arts. The project, which will be designed by Kise, Franks & Straw, is expected to cost $19.2 million. The financially strapped school district, facing a $60 million operating deficit next year, has committed $5.2 million in capital funds, with $6 million to come from the state, $3 million from the city and $5 million from the private sector.
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Abington Art Center doesn't want to be known as an elitist arts organization. So it is encouraging an open dialogue among members of the community, artists, arts administrators and township officials. The value of arts in the community will be the focus of a town meeting Saturday that will coincide with the opening of the center's Artists' Cultural Exchange exhibit. Speakers will be Nancy Allbaugh, director of curriculum for the Abington School District; Township Commissioner Donald W. DeVore; the cultural exchange's vice president, Elizabeth A. Kinzie; Darrell Painter, executive director of the Eastern Montgomery County Chamber of Commerce, and Philip Horn, executive director of the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts.
NEWS
August 11, 2006 | By Walter Dallas
Generally, I am in agreement with many of the ideas being vigorously debated with regard to addressing Philadelphia's insanely escalating murder rate: modified gun-control laws; sophisticated, strategically positioned surveillance cameras; and a fortified police presence in the neighborhoods. I applaud community groups no longer willing to tolerate the madness, and I support a curfew that will at least urge our children off the streets and out of harm's way. These ideas focus on immediate, short-term solutions, which is necessary given the circumstances.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1999 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
First there was a play in a parked car. Then came a fight in a parking lot. This year, the third annual Philadelphia Fringe Festival introduces a roving 1986 Plymouth Reliant as The Y2K Car. The performers? The Four Horsepower of the Apocalypse, of course. The 1999 Fringe - an interdisciplinary melange of avant-garde theater, performance art, dance, music, poetry, comedy and visual arts - will open Wednesday and run through Sept. 25. Not counting the separately run Visual Fringe, the festival will feature about 560 performances of 150 shows in 46 venues, mostly in Old City.
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