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NEWS
December 8, 2012
Eileen Moran, 60, a visual-effects producer who helped create the look of a bevy of blockbuster movies - from the ethereal world of Avatar down to King Kong's 460 billion strands of wind-rustled specially lighted fur - died Sunday in Wellington, New Zealand. The cause was cancer, her sister Janet Hamill said. Ms. Moran worked closely with the director James Cameron on Avatar and with the director Peter Jackson on the Lord of the Rings trilogy and The Hobbit, to be released in U.S. theaters this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1995 | By Deni Kasrel, FOR THE INQUIRER
A program of dance works by Jamie Avins and Leah Stein at the Arts Bank Friday and Saturday combined choreography with architectural and sculptural stage design, lighting and musical effects. The integration of movement and technical elements was achieved with varying degrees of success and was most productive in Dreamfield, a collaboration between visual artist Jeanne Jaffe and dancer Leah Stein. The piece explores the transformation of objects of ambiguous form, with metamorphoses coming about as Stein draped herself over or slid under or in other ways played with Jaffe's sculptures.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1990 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Las Vegas handicapper Lenny Del Genio has established "Driving Miss Daisy" as the strongest entrant in this year's Oscar field. Del Genio, who correctly picked four of five of the major categories last year, tabbed "Driving Miss Daisy" as a likely winner in three categories when the awards are announced March 26. The movie is an even-money favorite for best picture, Jessica Tandy is an even-money favorite for best actress, and Morgan Freeman...
NEWS
July 29, 1994 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"The Mask" casts Jim Carrey as a meek soul who finds a magical mask that turns his face into a rubbery visage capable of manifesting an endless array of weird, uninhibited characters. This is redundant, since's Carrey's face is already a rubbery visage capable of manifesting an endless array of weird, uninhibited characters. The difference here is that Carrey's contortions are augmented by Hollywood's astonishing new generation of computer animation effects. In "The Mask," Carrey's eyes do not merely bulge.
NEWS
August 11, 2012
Special-effects master and three-time Oscar winner Carlo Rambaldi, 86, died Friday in Italy after a long illness, Italian news media reported. Mr. Rambaldi was known as the father of E.T. He won visual effects Oscars for Steven Spielberg's 1982 extraterrestrial hit, as well as Ridley Scott's film Alien in 1979, and John Guillermin's King Kong in 1976. Mr. Rambaldi worked on more than 30 films, but was best known for his work on E.T. , for which he created three robots, two costumes worn by actors in the scenes when E.T. walked, and gloves for the hands.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1995 | By Bing Mark, FOR THE INQUIRER
The five sketches and works-in-progress presented Monday night as part of the Carlisle Project at the University of the Arts Dance Theater had substance, and variety. Using classical ballet steps and forms, all but one managed to communicate its main point clearly. Trey McIntyre's Broken/Pieces and Lisa Hess' Sensemaya were perhaps the simplest but also the most successful pieces on the program - McIntyre's because of its delicate suggestiveness and Hess' because of its musical drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2005 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
For all its humor, "Faux Show" would be even better if it had stuck more closely to its theme. Only 14 of the show's 20 artists addressed the concept of imitation or fakeness. I'm still puzzled by the inclusion of Steven Wise's two small paintings of numbers, Charles Hobbs' carved wood snake, and Merrilee Challiss' quiltlike, stitched-together drawings (created with Chris Lawson and Andrea Paschal). The latter two borrow from American craft traditions, certainly, but you'd never think faux.
NEWS
March 26, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It was broadsword vs. broadsword in the Oscars arena, but in the end Gladiator vanquished Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, taking a total of five statuettes, including best picture and actor, for star Russell Crowe, at the 73d Academy Awards in Los Angeles last night. Julia Roberts added another man to her trophy shelf, winning the actress honor for her portrayal of an indefatigable legal secretary in Erin Brockovich. And in the evening's biggest surprise, Marcia Gay Harden took the supporting-actress prize for her ferocious performance as artist Lee Krasner in Pollock, the biography of painter Jackson Pollock.
NEWS
March 6, 2006 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Crash, a Los Angeles tapestry of knotty race relations, won the best picture at the 78th Academy Awards in Hollywood last night. It was one of four movies - including the night's presumptive favorite, Brokeback Mountain - awarded three statuettes. The evening proved something of a Brokeback-lash, as the film was denied the top prize as well as three acting awards. The Oscars honored actors who played real-life figures and supporting players who essayed characters of conscience.
NEWS
June 29, 1999 | by Erin Einhorn, Daily News Staff Writer
It was a burning-hot June afternoon and - no doubt about it - the kids on the steps of Carpenters Hall would rather have been elsewhere. "You see this!" Ann Meredith scoffed as she walked past. The teen boys in the back of the field-trip group were twirling cameras at the ends of their straps. The girls were repositioning themselves for a more even tan. "See how restless they are. That's what history is to them," said Meredith, shaking her head. "Our show will reach out to these kids.
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NEWS
December 8, 2012
Eileen Moran, 60, a visual-effects producer who helped create the look of a bevy of blockbuster movies - from the ethereal world of Avatar down to King Kong's 460 billion strands of wind-rustled specially lighted fur - died Sunday in Wellington, New Zealand. The cause was cancer, her sister Janet Hamill said. Ms. Moran worked closely with the director James Cameron on Avatar and with the director Peter Jackson on the Lord of the Rings trilogy and The Hobbit, to be released in U.S. theaters this month.
NEWS
August 11, 2012
Special-effects master and three-time Oscar winner Carlo Rambaldi, 86, died Friday in Italy after a long illness, Italian news media reported. Mr. Rambaldi was known as the father of E.T. He won visual effects Oscars for Steven Spielberg's 1982 extraterrestrial hit, as well as Ridley Scott's film Alien in 1979, and John Guillermin's King Kong in 1976. Mr. Rambaldi worked on more than 30 films, but was best known for his work on E.T. , for which he created three robots, two costumes worn by actors in the scenes when E.T. walked, and gloves for the hands.
NEWS
May 21, 2012 | Steven Rea
One of the obvious differences between The Dictator, the new Sacha Baron Cohen comedy, and Borat and Bruno, his 2006 and 2009 endeavors, is that the latter two, of course, were real. That is, they presented themselves as documentary-like affairs, with Baron Cohen's Kazakh TV personality and Austrian fashion journalist, respectively, inserting themselves into real-life situations with real-life people. Unscripted. Let the fur fly. In The Dictator, Baron Cohen plays General Admiral Haffaz Aladeen, the ruler of a fictional North African republic.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Avatar and Fantastic Mr. Fox, two of 2009's most satisfying screen endeavors, couldn't be further apart, technology-wise. In vivid ways, they represent the future and the past of filmmaking - the 21st and 20th centuries - and demonstrate with resounding artistry that both innovation and a respect for tradition are essential storytelling components. James Cameron's $230 million-plus sci-fi eco-yarn, about an ex-Marine who joins a blue-skinned tribe on a faraway planet, deployed new 3-D cameras, sophisticated motion-capture devices, an army of digital renderers and more visual effects and CGI than you can shake a stick at. Wes Anderson's Fantastic Mr. Fox, adapted from the Roald Dahl children's book about a family of foxes and its efforts to, um, outfox a trio of farmers, was filmed in the no-less-painstaking process of stop-motion animation, with puppets repositioned in micro-increments on dollhouse sets.
NEWS
February 23, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Slumdog Millionaire, the Cinderella story of a Mumbai orphan who rises from rags to riches, swept the 81st Academy Awards in Hollywood last night, winning eight of the nine categories in which it was nominated, including best picture and director. It was a stunning triumph for a film that, not unlike its hero, was orphaned by one distributor before it was picked up by another and adopted by audiences around the world. On her sixth Oscar nomination, Kate Winslet won the lead-actress prize for her role as a German tram conductor with two dark secrets in The Reader.
SPORTS
February 23, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
More than $81,000 in cash belonging to Tennessee Titans cornerback Adam "Pacman" Jones was seized by police, who say the money sparked a weekend melee and a triple shooting at a Las Vegas strip club. Jones was showering more than 40 strippers onstage early Monday with cash "intended as a visual effect," a search warrant said. But a scuffle broke out when the Houston promoter who hired the strippers told them to pick up the money. The promoter, identified as Chris Mitchell, owner of "Harlem Knights," and a male associate took a plastic trash bag containing Jones' money and walked out the front door, the warrant says.
NEWS
March 6, 2006 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Crash, a Los Angeles tapestry of knotty race relations, won the best picture at the 78th Academy Awards in Hollywood last night. It was one of four movies - including the night's presumptive favorite, Brokeback Mountain - awarded three statuettes. The evening proved something of a Brokeback-lash, as the film was denied the top prize as well as three acting awards. The Oscars honored actors who played real-life figures and supporting players who essayed characters of conscience.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2005 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
For all its humor, "Faux Show" would be even better if it had stuck more closely to its theme. Only 14 of the show's 20 artists addressed the concept of imitation or fakeness. I'm still puzzled by the inclusion of Steven Wise's two small paintings of numbers, Charles Hobbs' carved wood snake, and Merrilee Challiss' quiltlike, stitched-together drawings (created with Chris Lawson and Andrea Paschal). The latter two borrow from American craft traditions, certainly, but you'd never think faux.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Creative Artists Network calls "Hot Off the Press" a show of "emerging printmakers" selected by "an emerging curator. " The ringmaster is Susan White, assistant director of the Print Center. She has chosen seven young artists whose prints embrace a broad range of options, from the traditional expressionism of Chris Hartshorne's woodcuts to Rebekah Tolley's digital distortions of body parts. Eclecticism both characterizes the show and makes it stimulating. For instance, Jungohk (Theresa)
NEWS
April 2, 2001 | By Peter Mucha INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Is there a link between Viagra and sudden vision loss? Among the millions of men who have tried the drug for erectile dysfunction over the last three years, doctors have reported five cases in which men had permanent loss of some spots of vision. Howard Pomeranz, director of neuro-ophthalmology at the University of Maryland Medical Center, had a 52-year-old patient who experienced sudden and irreversible loss of some side vision within an hour of taking Viagra. Four other documented cases - one of his, two from Texas and one from Missouri - occurred in men within a day after they took Viagra, he said.
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