FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 18, 1994 | By David Lamb, LOS ANGELES TIMES
For half a century, the Voice of America held a virtual monopoly in telling America's story - warts and all - to the world. From Africa to the Soviet Union, millions of listeners came to rely on VOA radio as an accurate source of news. But the end of the Cold War and the democratization of closed societies have brought vast changes to international broadcasting. Now the VOA, facing real competition, is looking to carve out new markets. "We're no longer the voice coming over the wall or the voice through the door," said John Lennon, the VOA's southern European division chief.
NEWS
October 10, 2001 | By Steve Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was during another war, with its own controversies, and President Lyndon B. Johnson was livid over U.S. news media reporting on the conflict in Vietnam. "Well, dammit, if they won't tell the story," Johnson roared, "I've got my own radio station. " His own station was the Voice of America, a U.S. government-funded and -directed global radio network that hit the airwaves during World War II and opened a new propaganda front during the Cold War. In the last decade, the VOA has shed its role as official mouthpiece, been separated from the supervision of the U.S. State Department, and established itself - in the view of its advocates - as an objective news source for 100 million people worldwide.
NEWS
February 14, 1988 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
The hungry and the homeless clogged the smoky meal hall on Camden's Market Street. Lunch was tuna on white bread. The crowd was winding down, some smoking cigarettes, some seeking out card games or conversation, all whiling away time until the next free meal. But merchants and police complain about the darker rhythms of the desperate: Some of those who frequent the center panhandle. Some fight. Pedestrians often cross the street if they don't avoid the street altogether. Police and merchants believe the Volunteers of America shelter and soup kitchen at 317 Market St. is a magnet for criminals that repels customers from a fragile business district.
NEWS
March 28, 1986 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A man who had been turned away from the Volunteers of America shelter in Camden set fire to the facility last night, damaging two floors and forcing the evacuation of Camden's largest shelter for the homeless, shelter officials said. VOA officials said a man in his early 20s demanded a bed at the three-floor facility at 317 Market St. about 7:30 p.m. and was turned down because he was apparently drunk. After he was refused a bed, witnesses said, he ran to the second floor of the shelter and set it afire.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
Residents at a North Philadelphia homeless shelter, most of them former drug addicts, staged a demonstration yesterday to protest city budget cuts that they said would close their program. About a dozen residents of the Volunteers of America (VOA) shelter, which houses about 230 people at Broad and Huntington Streets, waved placards at passing cars to denounce the cuts in spending for the homeless. The demonstration was sparked by letters that many residents received last week from Jane Malone, director of the city's Office of Services to the Homeless and Adults, explaining that program cuts would be made this month.
NEWS
May 14, 1989 | By Christopher Hand, Special to The Inquirer
The Gloucester County Board of Social Services has accepted a bid from the Volunteers of America to house the county's homeless at the Volunteers of America (VOA) shelter, a former youth facility in Elk Township. The county houses about 10 homeless families in motels at an average cost of $1,200 per month per family, according to social services director Carol Pirrotta. The VOA will charge $24 per person per night for families of up to five at the shelter, which is scheduled to open by October after building renovations.
NEWS
May 21, 1988 | By Maureen Graham, Special to The Inquirer
A decision Thursday by a Superior Court judge has cleared the way for the opening of the first shelter for the homeless in Gloucester County. Officials for Volunteers for America (VOA) said yesterday that an eight- bedroom shelter complete with a gymnasium, two living rooms, and an office could be in business in Elk Township by the fall. "With repairs and renovations, my guess is that sometime in September we would be ready to open," said Bernard E. Fulghum an attorney for VOA. The homeless from Gloucester County currently are housed in facilities in one of the three Camden County shelters operated by the VOA, said Paul Shelly, a spokesman for the Pennsauken-based group.
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Mike Franolich, Special to The Inquirer
An inmate surrendered to authorities Monday night after he had fled from a Camden halfway house earlier in the day - an escape prompted by his fear that state prison guards were about to take him back to jail because they suspected he had been using drugs, officials said yesterday. But the drug that Robert Broadnax, 26, had taken was cold medicine prescribed by a doctor at Riverfront State Prison in Camden, and he was not violating the halfway-house rules, said Daniel Lombardo, president of the Volunteers of America program in which Broadnax was enrolled.
NEWS
February 14, 1986 | By Ellen O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden City Council last night approved a plan by the Volunteers of America (VOA) to open a shelter for 250 homeless people and abused women, despite objections by local residents that the shelter would "strain" the neighborhood. Council voted 5-2 to accept a variance by the city Zoning Board of Adjustment for the shelter. Neighbors had appealed the variance. "These are not homeless people. They're freeloaders," said Freddie Alvarado of the Bergen Lanning section of south Camden, where the VOA plans to renovate three buildings.
NEWS
February 12, 1986 | By Ellen O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
An attorney for Volunteers of America (VOA) told the Camden City Council yesterday that the council had forfeited its right to reject a shelter planned for 250 homeless people and abused women because the members had failed to act on time. Attorney Peter M. Rhodes told the seven council members that state law required them to consider any objections to the proposed shelter within 95 days after the city's Zoning Board of Adjustment approved the plan. The zoning board published its decision accepting the shelter on Oct. 28, Rhodes said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Collingswood nonprofit will receive $6.3 million in tax incentives to move its headquarters to Camden, making it the latest entity to relocate there with help from the state Economic Development Authority (EDA). The EDA on Tuesday approved the request by Volunteers of America Delaware Valley, a Christian ministry that has an office in Camden as well as offices in other locations in the area, for $633,750 in breaks annually for 10 years. The organization plans to move 65 jobs about five miles, from an office on White Horse Pike to a city location on Market Street.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The nightmares have stopped, but the gruesome images and sickening smell of the so-called Highway of Death remain fixed in his memory 22 years later. He recalls the blackened bodies of soldiers who tried to escape burning tanks, the dead filling a charred bus, and hundreds of smashed vehicles littering the road between Iraq and Kuwait where the retreating Iraqi army was hit by U.S. air strikes during the Gulf War. Army Spec. Charles Vogel, a member of the New Jersey National Guard's 235th Transportation Company, witnessed the attack, then got a close-up look at its deadly aftermath.
NEWS
October 14, 2001 | By Jill Nelson
Here in America we are locked somewhere between torpor and expectancy. A nation defined by its freedoms and arrogance, since Sept. 11 we have been stuck in this uncertain place. Here, the background music is not the clash of diverse voices raised in discussion or argument, but the drumbeat of war. Voices of difference and dissent are overwhelmed by cries for vengeance and retribution. Overnight, our patriotism has been abruptly redefined by the degree of our support for the administration of George W. Bush and the bombing of Afghanistan.
NEWS
October 10, 2001 | By Steve Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was during another war, with its own controversies, and President Lyndon B. Johnson was livid over U.S. news media reporting on the conflict in Vietnam. "Well, dammit, if they won't tell the story," Johnson roared, "I've got my own radio station. " His own station was the Voice of America, a U.S. government-funded and -directed global radio network that hit the airwaves during World War II and opened a new propaganda front during the Cold War. In the last decade, the VOA has shed its role as official mouthpiece, been separated from the supervision of the U.S. State Department, and established itself - in the view of its advocates - as an objective news source for 100 million people worldwide.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | By Gaiutra Bahadur, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ralph Fletcher's life follows a rhythm that is basic. "Go to work. Come back. Do what I have to do, and that's it. " In quick, short stabs, he describes what he says is a generic Joe's life, working 8 to 4 as a janitor at a Volunteers of America halfway house in Camden, living with his 81-year-old mother in North Philadelphia, and playing the occasional game of pool on the weekends. But to officials at the halfway house, which is helping more than 80 ex-convicts work their way back into society, Fletcher is more than a generic Joe. Yesterday, they rechristened their Penn Street facility after the 62-year-old Camden native, a faithful employee who has not missed a day of work in 21 years and who first came to them as a parolee from the Lewisburg federal prison in Pennsylvania in 1977.
NEWS
March 7, 1997 | By Stephanie Brenowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
To the dismay of the borough and the cheer of the opposition, the Volunteers of America has backed out of its plan to build a $4.5 million senior-housing complex in the old Lincoln Avenue School. The project was becoming too costly, said Dan Lombardo, president of the Delaware Valley VOA affiliate. "There's only so many expenses we can bear, since we're a nonprofit," said Lombardo. "We were looking for more support from the borough. So they'll just have to proceed without the VOA. " The complex would have been a four-story, 48-unit apartment building with affordable rents for senior citizens.
NEWS
February 13, 1997 | By Stephanie Brenowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A nonprofit agency's bid to build a 48-unit senior-citizen apartment building on the site of the old Lincoln Avenue school got a boost this week from the Board of Commissioners, which voted to give the Volunteers of America $33,000 toward purchasing the land. The national nonprofit will present its proposal to residents at 3 p.m. Sunday at the Mable Kay House at 24 Walnut St., near the proposed site. The apartments would be for independent seniors. The need for such housing in Haddonfield has been well-documented, both by borough studies and by the nonprofit itself.
NEWS
July 24, 1995 | By Miriam Lupkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A temporary relocation of homeless men outside Camden - an arrangement that has stretched out to seven years - is to end by year's end with the help of a $2.3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The grant will enable the shelter to move its clients back to Camden, where they should have better access to education, health, housing and employment services, director Marvin W. Price said. "By coming back to Camden, we are creating a network of services with other care providers in the city," added Daniel L. Lombardo, head of Volunteers of America Delaware Valley Inc., which runs the shelter, Jefferson House.
NEWS
September 18, 1994 | By David Lamb, LOS ANGELES TIMES
For half a century, the Voice of America held a virtual monopoly in telling America's story - warts and all - to the world. From Africa to the Soviet Union, millions of listeners came to rely on VOA radio as an accurate source of news. But the end of the Cold War and the democratization of closed societies have brought vast changes to international broadcasting. Now the VOA, facing real competition, is looking to carve out new markets. "We're no longer the voice coming over the wall or the voice through the door," said John Lennon, the VOA's southern European division chief.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | By Katharine Seelye and Alexandra Backlanova, Inquirer Staff Writers
As the clampdown on the Soviet mass media tightened yesterday with the official banning of broadcasts by reformist radio and television stations, voices of resistance continued to seep through the cracks. The Soviet hard-liners had allowed nine newspapers to keep publishing. The official Union of Soviet Journalists yesterday faxed an appeal to the those papers asking all journalists to "report only the truth" and to use "any method available to distribute information about the situation in the country," the Associated Press reported.
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