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ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1992 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Some music careers travel an orderly path - an early stylistic niche opens up a series of unfolding opportunities, which are followed by more growth and more opportunities. Robin Holcomb's career is more unusual. A gifted pianist who spent most of the '80s with the New York Composer's Orchestra in Manhattan's flourishing "downtown" free-jazz scene, Holcomb found herself writing poetry a few years ago. Then she started putting that poetry to music. Then she and husband Wayne Horvitz, a keyboard player, composer and producer, moved to Seattle, where she began recording this vocal music.
NEWS
February 17, 2013
Walter A. Lamont, 83, of Holland, retired music supervisor for the School District of Philadelphia, died Sunday, Feb. 3, at Abington Hospice at Warminster of end-stage renal disease. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Lamont graduated from Olney High School. In 1951, he earned his bachelor of science degree in music education from West Chester State University. He served in the Army during the Korean War and was honorably discharged in 1953. Mr. Lamont worked for the Centennial School District for two years before he was hired by the Philadelphia School District in the 1950s.
NEWS
August 2, 1987 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Artistically talented teenagers will have an opportunity to expand their study at the New Jersey School of the Arts when its fall semester gets under way in September at Glassboro State College. Auditions for high school students interested in taking part in the program will be held Saturday and Aug. 12 at the college. The School of the Arts was started by the state Department of Education in 1979 "to offer an opportunity for additional study for students with talent in the arts," said Jacqueline Goldberg, coordinator for the school's South Jersey program.
NEWS
August 2, 1987 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Artistically talented teenagers will have an opportunity to expand their study at the New Jersey School of the Arts when its fall semester gets under way in September at Glassboro State College. Auditions for high school students interested in taking part in the program will be held Saturday and Aug. 12 at the college. The School of the Arts was started by the state Department of Education in 1979 "to offer an opportunity for additional study for students with talent in the arts," said Jacqueline Goldberg, coordinator for the school's South Jersey program.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1995 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As intricately crafted as Eric Sessler's Songs of the King may be, it communicates its emotional messages as clear as a bell. Premiered last night by the Music Group of Philadelphia, the choral work, whose text is taken from Alfred Lord Tennyson's "Idylls of the King," is heraldic one minute, poignant the next. Sessler, 25, a resident of Feasterville, takes great care in choosing the right music for his Arthurian text. There are few universally recognized connections between the words and music - a Stravinskyesque trumpet blows as the poem proclaims Blow, trumpet, and the Dies Irae appears when the subject of death comes up. No, Sessler is interested in something much more subtle and instinctive, reflecting meaning in his music the way composers like Britten and Faure were able to do so well in their vocal music.
NEWS
October 14, 2009
Programs offered Neighborhood and citywide high schools offer various specialty and vocational programs. Parents should contact individual schools to get information about specific programs, which include: Creative/performing arts Programs: drawing, painting, sculpture, ceramics, printmaking, and crafts; and in the performing arts, which may include instrumental music, vocal music, dance and drama. Schools: Fels, Frankford, Germantown, Gratz, Lincoln, Northeast, Olney West, Overbrook, Roxborough, Mansion, Washington and West Philly Junior ROTC Programs: United States Army, Air Force or Navy Junior ROTC academies and programs Schools: Bartram, Germantown, Gratz, Lincoln, Swenson, West Philly, Frankford, King, Overbrook, Military Academies at Elverson and Leeds, Roxborough, South Philly, Mansion and Franklin Agriculture/environmental /natural resources Programs: horticulture, animal science, greenhouse management Schools: Lincoln Automotive technology Schools: Edison, Mastbaum, King, Randolph, Swenson, West Philly Business/finance Programs: accounting, banking, computer software, office administration Schools: Bartram, Bok, Dobbins, Edison, Fels, Furness, Germantown, Mastbaum, Philadelphia High School for Business and Technology, Overbrook, Rhodes, Roxborough, Washington, West Philly Cosmetology/barbering/ fashion design Programs: cosmetology, barbering, fashion...
NEWS
February 8, 1987 | By Frank Langfitt, Special to The Inquirer
Joseph R. Carmitchell, 44, of Bala Cynwyd, an instrumental music teacher in the Lower Merion school system, died Jan. 31 at Metropolitan Hospital in Philadelphia after a lengthy illness. Born in Lancaster, Pa., in 1942, Mr. Carmitchell was the son of William H. Carmitchell and Ruth Carmitchell. He received his bachelor's degree from the Eastman School of Music at the University of Rochester, N.Y., in 1964, and his master's degree in performance from Temple University in 1967. He taught instrumental music in elementary schools including Merion, Cynwyd and Narberth Elementary from 1965 until 1980, when he became the instrumental music teacher at the Welsh Valley Middle School in Narberth.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
"I'm not a soloist," says Suzzette Ortiz, who retires this week after teaching vocal music in Camden's public schools for 27 years. "I do harmony. " That's an apt, if incomplete, description of what Ortiz has done for thousands of students, especially at the city's Creative Arts High School. She was there on opening day in 1999, and on Thursday, she'll close her classroom door in what is now the Creative Arts Morgan Village Academy for the last time. "This is a big chapter of my life that's closing," says Ortiz, who grew up in Puerto Rico and lives in Pennsauken.
NEWS
June 19, 1992 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It's amazing how a little bit of show business can break a trance. Wednesday at the Academy of Music, in a Mellon PSFS Jazz Festival concert that was conceived in Tin Pan Alley heaven, vocalist and pianist Shirley Horn, bassist Charles Ables and drummer Steve Williams achieved a peerless group empathy early in the set, and sustained it through a program of substantially re-invented standards. They painted expansive ballads such as "Soothe Me" as if in slow motion - Horn's voice teased out each line with a patient, passionate restraint that lingered over every nuance.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2015 | By Matthew Westphal, For The Inquirer
Piffaro, Philadelphia's Renaissance wind band, celebrated a big anniversary this weekend. Not its own 30th (that's next season), but the 500th birthday of perhaps the most influential composer you've never heard of: Cipriano de Rore, the first to deliberately shape his music to the meaning and rhythm of the text being sung rather than using the words mostly as pegs for constructions of notes. With that change in emphasis, Rore transformed vocal music and made possible the birth of opera in the following century.
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NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
"I'm not a soloist," says Suzzette Ortiz, who retires this week after teaching vocal music in Camden's public schools for 27 years. "I do harmony. " That's an apt, if incomplete, description of what Ortiz has done for thousands of students, especially at the city's Creative Arts High School. She was there on opening day in 1999, and on Thursday, she'll close her classroom door in what is now the Creative Arts Morgan Village Academy for the last time. "This is a big chapter of my life that's closing," says Ortiz, who grew up in Puerto Rico and lives in Pennsauken.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2015 | By Matthew Westphal, For The Inquirer
Piffaro, Philadelphia's Renaissance wind band, celebrated a big anniversary this weekend. Not its own 30th (that's next season), but the 500th birthday of perhaps the most influential composer you've never heard of: Cipriano de Rore, the first to deliberately shape his music to the meaning and rhythm of the text being sung rather than using the words mostly as pegs for constructions of notes. With that change in emphasis, Rore transformed vocal music and made possible the birth of opera in the following century.
NEWS
February 2, 2014
Schooling generations in song As a college student in 1959, I had the honor of meeting and singing along with Pete Seeger at Oberlin College. We all joined him in a hootenanny after his concert performance, singing into the wee hours ("A giant of music and activism," Jan. 29). Through the years, when I taught vocal music to elementary school children in the Philadelphia public schools, I included many songs that Seeger wrote or cowrote. I explained the songs' historical context, and how songs can be used to speak out for peace and justice, or in protest.
NEWS
February 17, 2013
Walter A. Lamont, 83, of Holland, retired music supervisor for the School District of Philadelphia, died Sunday, Feb. 3, at Abington Hospice at Warminster of end-stage renal disease. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Lamont graduated from Olney High School. In 1951, he earned his bachelor of science degree in music education from West Chester State University. He served in the Army during the Korean War and was honorably discharged in 1953. Mr. Lamont worked for the Centennial School District for two years before he was hired by the Philadelphia School District in the 1950s.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
If a Philadelphia Museum of Art retrospective ever warranted a musical component, it's the current Visions of Arcadia . And on Sunday, it had one, courtesy of the Curtis Institute of Music, in a concert titled "Wooing the Woodland Muse on a Slender Reed . " The visual art in this popular exhibition (which closes Monday) isn't so much about a particular aesthetic as it is an idea that resonated in art for centuries. Though Arcadia is indeed a real place in Greece, it's best known as a fantasy utopia where, to judge from the paintings of Gauguin, C├ęzanne, and Matisse on current display, clothes were optional, weather was pleasant, and, as one commentator put it, death came as a puzzling surprise.
NEWS
May 4, 2012 | Kevin Riordan
Alysia Lee can already hear the voices of the Sister Cities Girlchoir. She can see the faces of young women from Camden and Philadelphia as they harmonize with and help each other and their communities. "We'll start with 60 middle school students in Camden and another 120 in Philly in September," says Lee, who has spent the last six months enlisting support from civic leaders, musicians, and educators in both cities to launch the group. "We're looking for people who like to sing.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Bolivia can be a cultural blank to Americans, perhaps better known as a producer of coffee and natural gas (and coca) than as a country so musically rich that even remote villages echo an exalted past with present-day accomplishments. The latter is what Philadelphia's Renaissance band Piffaro discovered 18 months ago when it was invited to play the International Renaissance and Baroque Festival there. Now it has brought some of those riches back to Philadelphia in "East Meets West: Spanish Pipers in the New World," which it will present in three area concerts this weekend.
NEWS
October 14, 2009
Programs offered Neighborhood and citywide high schools offer various specialty and vocational programs. Parents should contact individual schools to get information about specific programs, which include: Creative/performing arts Programs: drawing, painting, sculpture, ceramics, printmaking, and crafts; and in the performing arts, which may include instrumental music, vocal music, dance and drama. Schools: Fels, Frankford, Germantown, Gratz, Lincoln, Northeast, Olney West, Overbrook, Roxborough, Mansion, Washington and West Philly Junior ROTC Programs: United States Army, Air Force or Navy Junior ROTC academies and programs Schools: Bartram, Germantown, Gratz, Lincoln, Swenson, West Philly, Frankford, King, Overbrook, Military Academies at Elverson and Leeds, Roxborough, South Philly, Mansion and Franklin Agriculture/environmental /natural resources Programs: horticulture, animal science, greenhouse management Schools: Lincoln Automotive technology Schools: Edison, Mastbaum, King, Randolph, Swenson, West Philly Business/finance Programs: accounting, banking, computer software, office administration Schools: Bartram, Bok, Dobbins, Edison, Fels, Furness, Germantown, Mastbaum, Philadelphia High School for Business and Technology, Overbrook, Rhodes, Roxborough, Washington, West Philly Cosmetology/barbering/ fashion design Programs: cosmetology, barbering, fashion...
NEWS
February 24, 2009 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Few operas have the wow factor of Turandot, and the Opera Company of Philadelphia's opening-night audience Friday was definitely wowed - remarkably so - despite near-appalling artistic lapses. Giacomo Puccini's final opera came at a time when the composer hadn't enjoyed a clear-cut hit in years, and had endured scandal after his upstairs maid, falsely accused of dallying with the composer, killed herself. The opera's scenario - an imperious Chinese princess who beheads her suitors, a conquering prince who wins her, and a self-sacrificing slave girl - is a triangle with obvious personal parallels.
NEWS
February 28, 2001 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Demurely slanted rays of winter sun set pensively over New York City's Corpus Christi Church a few Sundays ago, the delicately colored hues of the stained-glass windows shimmering in muted conspiracy with the radiantly clarion voices issuing forth from early-music group Lionheart. Except this time, when the Latin text reached the concluding "Amen," it came out sounding like "Ah-MOAN" (as in that sound you make when contacted by the IRS). A collective slip of the tongue? A crackpot academic wrinkle?
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