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Vocational Education

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NEWS
July 2, 1987 | By Laura Quinn, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Jersey Department of Education, which supported unsuccessful legislation that would have mandated improved programs for gifted children, proposed yesterday that school districts voluntarily enhance their programs. The state has required since 1979 that districts provide "appropriate instruction" to gifted students. However, state guidelines on the subject have remained vague, and annual state funding provides for only scattered test projects. As a result, state officials say, there are wide discrepancies among programs.
NEWS
November 16, 1987 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twelve years ago, the Central Chester County Vocational Technical School was booming. Built in 1972 to hold 840 students, the vocational-education center in Coatesville attracted 915 students in 1975. That was in its heyday, when families in Chester County still depended on Lukens Inc. steel company in Coatesville and other blue-collar employers for a secure future. Vocational education helped students get ready to enter the work world after high school. Now things are different.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | By Laurie Halse Anderson, Special to The Inquirer
A Hatboro-Horsham school board member says the eight school districts that send students to Eastern Montgomery Vocational-Technical School should heed the words of Revolutionary War hero Nathan Hale: "We must all hang together, or we will hang separately. " At the school board meeting Monday, board member James Hessinger reported that representatives from the eight districts met last week to discuss declining enrollment and increasing costs at the vo-tech school. Abington, Cheltenham, Hatboro-Horsham, Jenkintown, Lower Moreland, Upper Dublin, Upper Moreland and Springfield all send students to the vo-tech school.
NEWS
June 11, 1990 | By Reid Kanaley and Patrick Scott, Special to The Inquirer
As a young high school student feeling his way to the future, Chris Isett wanted to study electronics - but he sure didn't want to go to vo-tech. Vocational-technical education was to him the domain of academic misfits and problem students, Isett, a 1987 graduate of Pottsgrove High School, said in an interview. "Mostly everybody in school thought it was, like, if you couldn't make it in high school, you go to vo-tech," Isett said recently. Now, after two years of going nowhere in the job market, Isett is paying tuition to study electronics at RETS, a private trade school in Broomall.
NEWS
December 27, 1987 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nine applicants have asked Chester County Intermediate Unit officials for a chance to become the person in charge of drastically reconstructing the county's vocational education system. The position, director of occupational education, would last for only 18 months and would come with a salary of about $50,000 a year, said John Baillie, director of the Intermediate Unit. Baillie and a committee of 17 other county educators released a study in November outlining the rapidly declining enrollment and an apparent lack of student interest in the Central and Northern Chester County Vocational Technical Schools.
NEWS
August 30, 1992 | By DONALD KIMELMAN
The high school teachers gathered around a table in a Temple University faculty lounge one recent August afternoon were doing their small part to make Philadelphia (and America) more competitive in the years ahead. But that mission wouldn't have been apparent to a casual visitor. Under the tutelage of Morris Vogel, a Temple history professor, the teachers were trying to design a curriculum for the new "business institute" at Benjamin Franklin High School - a curriculum that would, at a minimum, prepare students who weren't college-bound for careers as office workers.
NEWS
December 7, 2007 | By Walt Gardner
With a reputation as a dumping ground for underperforming students, vocational education for too long lacked the sex appeal that the media love. But things are finally beginning to change as the demands of the new global economy cause a rethinking of the curriculum. Policymakers are willing to consider the possibility of a connection between the persistent graduation rate of 64 percent to 71 percent across the country and the concurrent marginalization of vocational education. Their belated acknowledgment has led to new interest in the benefits of what is now called "career and technical education.
NEWS
October 4, 1994 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
During a free period at Strath Haven High School, senior Rob Denney decided to do some work on his Camaro. He didn't have to sneak past his teachers. Rather, he just walked down the hall into the automotive mechanics class. The course is a new joint offering by the Wallingford-Swarthmore School District and the Delaware County Intermediate Unit (DCIU), said Strath Haven principal Mary Cornish. "The car is a piece of machinery our students use every day," she said. "This class offers them a chance to learn how it works.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1992 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
After a decade of neglect, vocational education is poised for a comeback. It may not seem as glamorous as four years at a liberal arts college, but experts say the country vitally needs trained workers in such fields as automotive repair, electronics, masonry and welding in order to revitalize manufacturing. "Our economic growth beyond the needs of the service economy is going to be based on a new generation of people who have the technical skills needed to produce, maintain and repair manufactured goods," said Bruce Bergwall, marketing vice president at Bergwall Productions, a Chester County firm that makes instructional videos for the vocational/technical educational market.
NEWS
October 31, 1994 | By Laura Genao, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A committee of Delaware County school district superintendents has passed a resolution that calls for an overhaul of the county's vocational education system. The Delaware County Chief School Administrators' Council, comprising superintendents from 15 districts, voted to decentralize the county's vocational schools during a meeting Oct. 21, said Nancy K. Quinn, spokeswoman for the Delaware County Intermediate Unit. "They want this process to look at all aspects of vocational education done, and they want it done now," she said.
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NEWS
December 15, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey's first Latina legislator is returning to Trenton five years after she left the state Assembly. Nilsa Cruz-Perez, who represented the Fifth Legislative District for 14 years in the Assembly, was officially appointed Saturday morning to the state Senate seat for that district. South Jersey Democrats last week had announced the selection of Cruz-Perez to fill the vacancy left by Donald Norcross when he was elected last month to the U.S. House of Representatives. She will take the oath of office at 1 p.m. Monday in the New Jersey Senate chamber.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
MARION B.W. HOLMES had a passion for education, especially the kind that prepares students for good jobs after they leave school. It's called vocational training, and for years Marion directed the teaching of useful skills for young people in the Philadelphia School District. Among the problems she dealt with was a bureacratic snafu in the state Department of Education in the early '90s that left many shop classes in city schools closed and dark. It seemed that the state had established a kind of Catch-22 by requiring high-school students to take 21 academic courses to graduate, while also requiring vocational-technical students to take three vocational classes a day. There weren't enough hours in a day to meet those rules.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Sean Carlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marion B.W. Holmes, 86, former executive director of vocational and career education at the Philadelphia School District, died Tuesday, Oct. 30, at Joseph C. Scott Medical Center in Abington after battling Parkinson's disease for more than a decade. Mrs. Holmes graduated from Abington High School in 1944 and received a bachelor's degree in business education from Temple University in 1948. She earned a master's degree in vocational education from Temple and later a doctorate at Rutgers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: My son is a freshman at an academically challenging liberal arts college. He is telling us that he is struggling to keep up, and, yes, we've told him to go to the academic advising office and the like. The larger issue is what he is concluding from his struggles - that he wants to become a music major, which is OK, except that his goal is to parlay his mediocre musical talents into a performance career. I don't want to quash the hopes of any 18-year-old, but how to make the best of this situation?
BUSINESS
July 11, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Sales of Beyond Knitting Concepts' fashion merchandise total just $600. Yet Aisha Alexander, cofounder of the venture started a little more than six months ago with a knitting buddy, confidently describes herself as a successful business owner. "It's all about your state of mind," the South Philadelphia resident explained. Yuri Schneiberg sees it differently. In fact, he's staking a new business venture on a belief that he's right. Success as a small-business owner requires much more than a positive outlook, Schneiberg said - it requires an education specially designed for entrepreneurs.
NEWS
April 9, 2011 | By VALERIE RUSS, russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987
As Philadelphia School District officials prepare to implement their new Facilities Master Plan, one area the district will examine more closely is making more career- and technical-education programs available to more high school students. But that may not mean a return to career education - what used to be called vocational education - at every high school. According to the master plan released Thursday, the district will "create career and technical centers" where students will "receive career and technical education at the Center and complete academic courses and receive diplomas at the neighborhood school.
NEWS
January 27, 2009 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New Jersey Education Commissioner Lucille E. Davy argued yesterday for a proposed redesigning of the high school curriculum, saying the state had fallen behind some others in requiring students to take advanced math and science courses. "We are no longer at the forward front here," Davy said to the Assembly Education Committee. While New Jersey is regarded as a relatively high academic performer, Davy said, it is not among the states with the most demanding science and math requirements.
NEWS
December 7, 2007 | By Walt Gardner
With a reputation as a dumping ground for underperforming students, vocational education for too long lacked the sex appeal that the media love. But things are finally beginning to change as the demands of the new global economy cause a rethinking of the curriculum. Policymakers are willing to consider the possibility of a connection between the persistent graduation rate of 64 percent to 71 percent across the country and the concurrent marginalization of vocational education. Their belated acknowledgment has led to new interest in the benefits of what is now called "career and technical education.
NEWS
April 24, 2006 | By ALEXA NOVACHEK
AS A LANCASTER public-school graduate, I'm aware of the effects on education of not having adequate funding. At my school, teachers spending their own money for supplies was routine and so were the letters home pleading with parents to send in used paper so we could use the blank side. In February, President Bush unveiled his budget for fiscal 2007 and announced his plan to cut the federal education budget by more than $3 billion. Coming from a school district with a 69 percent poverty rate and more than 900 homeless students, according to the school district Web site, I am passionate about equality.
NEWS
November 17, 2003 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eleanor Sutton Wiggins, 89, a retired educator who began her teaching career in the one-room schoolhouse that she attended as a child and worked to increase the ranks of minority teachers, died Tuesday at her Erial home after a long illness. In a career that spanned nearly four decades, Mrs. Wiggins held jobs in West Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Alabama, where she taught the children of the Tuskegee Airmen of World War II fame, said her daughter, Francyne Wiggins. Born in Atlanta, Mrs. Wiggins grew up in Weirton, W.Va.
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