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Vocational School

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NEWS
July 23, 2011
CHI Institute, a Broomall vocational school with a majority of its students receiving federal financial aid, has agreed to pay $1.6 million to reimburse the U.S. government and resolve allegations that CHI failed to deliver the education it promised to candidates in its now-suspended surgical technology program, the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania announced Friday. The surgical technology program, which ceased new enrollment in 2008, was supposed to prepare students for entry-level jobs in a surgical setting.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | By Marilou Regan, Special to The Inquirer
The Springfield School District will contribute about $446,000 to the county's vocational-technical school and Delaware County Community College in the next school year, officials said. At the district's study session Thursday night, School Superintendent Charles McLaughlin said the district expected to contribute $3,200 per pupil to the vocational-technical school's budget for the 1987-88 school year. McLaughlin said 46 students are expected to take part in the program, making a total of $147,000.
NEWS
March 15, 1998 | By Eric Dyer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Other counties have done it. But for some reason that argument hasn't swayed opponents of a plan to convert the Gloucester County Institute of Technology into a full-time school. In the nine months since a blue-ribbon panel recommended to county freeholders that the vocational school be expanded, the proposal has been ridiculed by small school districts, which worry about losing state dollars when some of their students jump to the technical institute. GCIT officials say the institution can't survive as a shared-time school: Funding is shrinking for such programs, and it is impossible for students to meet state education standards when they spend part of their day traveling between schools.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | By Beverly M. Payton, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The Central Bucks school board agreed Tuesday to form a task force that will study alternatives to sending students to the Middle Bucks Vocational- Technical School. Superintendent Robert H. Winters said enrollment at the vocational school has declined sharply from 1,166 students in the 1982-83 school year to 470 this year. As a result, he said, the per-student cost has increased by 50 percent during the last two years. A student enrolled in a half-day program at the vocational school costs the district $7,000 a year.
NEWS
September 27, 2007 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carlos Matos, a passionate and controversial North Philadelphia Democratic ward leader, described himself as an activist who followed his heart. Undoubtedly, he helped untold numbers of the downtrodden, judging from the 60 supporters who went to Camden yesterday in two yellow school buses for his hearing in U.S. District Court. There, Matos was sentenced to three years in prison and fined $50,000 for bribing three Atlantic City councilmen in the hope they would help him get a role in several development projects.
NEWS
March 19, 1997 | By Richard Sine, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
School board member Jack King, who has voted against raises for district administrators, was criticized Monday night for approving raises for vocational school administrators without the board's consent. King is one of nine members of the Joint Operating Committee of the Center for Technical Studies in Norristown, which enrolls about 600 students from three school districts, including the Upper Merion Area district. Last month the committee unanimously approved raises for three administrators.
NEWS
April 11, 1991 | By Michelle Rizzo, Special to The Inquirer
For almost an hour Monday, Bristol Township school board members fired questions at two Bucks County Vocational Technical School administrators - demanding to know why the vocational school had asked for an increase of more than half a million dollars from the district for its 1991-1992 budget. The board then voted, 6-1, to postpone action on the request. The vocational school is financed by the six lower and central Bucks school districts that send students through its doors.
NEWS
June 26, 1988 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
State regulations intended to improve high school education in New Jersey are indirectly forcing the loss of students and the cutback of courses at the Gloucester County Vocational Technical School, according to Victor Morella, superintendent of the Sewell school. In the last school year, the vocational school lost 85 students - about 10 percent of its enrollment - because the students did not pass the state- mandated high school proficiency test. The students were required by their high schools to take remedial courses and could not fit vocational school courses into their schedules, the superintendent said.
NEWS
March 2, 1989 | By Diane M. Fiske, Special to The Inquirer
Northern Chester County Technical School will undergo changes whether the Intermediate Unit plan to save the school is implemented or not. At the monthly meeting of the Northern Chester County Technical School Advisory Board Tuesday night, Robert Zimmerman, director of the vocational school in Phoenixville, said the administration is committed to making changes in the school, which serves the Phoenixville, Owen J. Roberts, Tredyffrin/ Easttown and...
NEWS
June 12, 1988 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
There are more than 38,000 adults over the age of 25 in Gloucester County who do not have high school diplomas, said John Karaska, quoting from 1980 federal census statistics. Karaska, evening school principal at Gloucester County Vocational-Technical School, hopes to make a dent in that statistic. The vocational school is about to become the first facility in Gloucester County to offer adult high school classes, leading to a diploma, on the premises. Currently, Karaska said, any adult in the county wishing a high school diploma must apply to Glassboro High School, which will enroll the student in its adult program.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 26, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kristen Hertzog was 16 when she discovered why people say Haiti is a place that can steal your heart while breaking it. A typical adolescent, worried about "boys and pimples," she had traveled to the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere with a church group from her hometown of Edison, N.J. One day, a Haitian woman rushed up to the teenager on the street, thrust a wad of dirty towels into her arms, then tried to run away. She did not get far. "I started screaming, 'She just gave me her baby!
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2012 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there In September 2009, the dating site eHarmony told Lisa and Ray that they might make a good pair. Looking at his profile, Lisa saw that Ray "was passionate about making a difference in the world, and I was intrigued by that. " Ray, who grew up in Cherry Hill, had moved to Camden to try to help revitalize that city. He is CEO of the nonprofit Latin American Economic Development Association, which helps to start and grow small businesses. Lisa, who lived in the Art Museum neighborhood, sent him a message through the eHarmony site.
NEWS
February 29, 2012 | By Thomas J. Sheeran and Kevin Begos, Associated Press
CHARDON, Ohio - The teenager accused of killing three students in a shooting rampage in an Ohio high school cafeteria chose his victims at random and is "someone who's not well," a prosecutor said Tuesday as the slightly built young man appeared in juvenile court. T.J. Lane, 17, admitted taking a .22-caliber pistol and a knife to Chardon High and firing 10 shots at a group of students sitting at a cafeteria table Monday morning, Prosecutor David Joyce said. Joyce said Lane would probably be charged with three counts of aggravated murder and other offenses.
NEWS
February 29, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHARDON, OHIO - The teenager accused of killing three students in a shooting rampage in an Ohio high-school cafeteria chose his victims at random and is "someone who's not well," a prosecutor said yesterday as the teenager was brought to juvenile court. T.J. Lane, 17, admitted taking a .22-caliber pistol and a knife to Chardon High and firing 10 shots at a group of students sitting at a cafeteria table Monday morning, prosecutor David Joyce said. The hearing came hours after the death toll rose to three, and as schoolmates and townspeople grappled with the tragedy and wondered what could have set the teen killer off - a mystery that the court appearance did nothing to solve.
NEWS
February 28, 2012 | By Thomas J. Sheeran, Associated Press
CHARDON, Ohio - A teenager opened fire in the cafeteria at his suburban Cleveland high school Monday, killing one student and wounding four others before he was chased from the building by a teacher and captured a short distance away, authorities said. A student who saw the attack up close said it appeared that the gunman targeted a group of students sitting together and that the student who was killed was gunned down while trying to duck under the table. FBI officials would not comment on a motive.
NEWS
July 23, 2011
CHI Institute, a Broomall vocational school with a majority of its students receiving federal financial aid, has agreed to pay $1.6 million to reimburse the U.S. government and resolve allegations that CHI failed to deliver the education it promised to candidates in its now-suspended surgical technology program, the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania announced Friday. The surgical technology program, which ceased new enrollment in 2008, was supposed to prepare students for entry-level jobs in a surgical setting.
NEWS
November 17, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
For nearly a year, people from all over the city have told the Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations stories - sobering, inspiring, instructive - about intergroup tension and violence in city schools. Since January, the city panel has held 11 hearings on the subject, drawing testimony from more than 100 people on subjects ranging from attacks on immigrants to bullying because of sexual orientation. The hearings were prompted by racial violence at South Philadelphia High. And after the final hearing Tuesday evening, commission chair Kay Kyungsun Yu said she had heard loud and clear that creative answers to violence and bullying exist in the Philadelphia School District, but only in pockets.
NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
At St. Dymphna's School in Tanzania, the students call Merida Reiner "Momma. " No wonder. The East African school for disabled children is her baby. And Reiner is one proud parent. "We started out with nothing," says the 61-year-old grandmother of six, who lives in Pennsauken. "Now we've got three classrooms, 27 children, and a waiting list of 13. Last year we put electricity in. Now my goal is running water for the village. " The strikingly youthful Reiner is a pedorthist, fabricating ankle braces and other devices for her husband, Maple Shade podiatrist Steven Reiner.
NEWS
February 24, 2009 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The two 19-year-olds linked to the Coatesville-area scourge of arsons briefly attended the same vocational school. Roger Leon Barlow Jr. and Mark Gilliam were among approximately 550 students who in 2007 and '08 attended the Center for Arts and Technology Pickering Campus near Phoenixville, one of three career and technical education centers run by the Chester County Intermediate Unit, IU spokeswoman Mary Jeanne Curley said yesterday. Now, like three other suspected arsonists arrested in December, the pair are in custody, and yet the set fires in the Coatesville area - 43 in 2008 and 25 in 2009 - have continued.
NEWS
September 27, 2007 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carlos Matos, a passionate and controversial North Philadelphia Democratic ward leader, described himself as an activist who followed his heart. Undoubtedly, he helped untold numbers of the downtrodden, judging from the 60 supporters who went to Camden yesterday in two yellow school buses for his hearing in U.S. District Court. There, Matos was sentenced to three years in prison and fined $50,000 for bribing three Atlantic City councilmen in the hope they would help him get a role in several development projects.
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