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Voice Mail

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NEWS
June 20, 1999 | By Mike Madden, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Some cutting-edge new telecommunications technology is coming soon to borough hall: Voice mail. After years and years when residents would find a live human being on the phone whenever they called the borough, officials are in the process of looking for a new phone system that has the sort of "press 1 now" commands typical of life in the 1990s. Or the 1970s, for that matter. "I think the biggest reason it took so long [to put in a voice-mail system] was that we really liked the concept of having someone to talk to, a real human being," Mayor Patrick Brennan said.
NEWS
April 22, 2011 | By Daniella Wexler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Are voice mails obsolete? Does anyone even listen to them anymore? With so many easier ways to communicate, leaving a voice mail may be like putting a message in a bottle. Someone might pick it up - eventually. Ask any young person. A few days ago at the Trader Joe's grocery in Center City, Surekha Sydney, 27, estimated that she received one voice mail for every 10 or 15 text messages. "The only people that leave me voice mails are strangers and my parents," she said. A couple of aisles over, Joe Cotsas, a sophomore at Drexel University, said he tells everyone he knows not to leave him voice mails.
BUSINESS
April 11, 1996 | By Frank Greve, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
If you hate voice mail, press one. If the mailbox is full, as it's likely to be, press two to reach an operator. If there isn't an operator, don't be surprised. You're stuck - again - in one of electronic America's most overcrowded but unpopular destinations: voice-mail jail. Officials of downsizing companies and government agencies have made voice-mail jails inescapable by slashing telephone-answering staffs to the bone. Tech-nerds made matters worse by assuming that every caller could spell out last names on a phone's number pad nimbly and correctly, maybe standing up, without glasses.
NEWS
April 23, 1996 | By Matt White, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When police called Terrance Crowley at home a few minutes past 6 a.m. yesterday asking him to cancel classes at Kingsway Regional High School, it put him in a tough spot. As Kingsway's superintendent, he could all but hear the ringing alarm clocks of Kingsway's 160-odd teachers, custodians and bus drivers, even as police told him about a chemical spill near the school. Just two hours from the tardy bell, every Kingsway staffer had to be contacted. "First I called KYW" for a radio announcement, Crowley said.
NEWS
October 31, 2002 | By Benjamin Wallace-Wells INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Around here, borough business still runs through the answering machine in Mayor Charles Shagg's living room. Every afternoon, Shagg wades through personal calls about dinners and visiting relatives to get to the gritty mayoral stuff: queries about garbage-pickup times, gripes about borough taxes. And the mayor says he's had enough. In September, Shagg asked Borough Council to install voice mail in the Pennsburg offices. "Right now, we're like a 19th-century village trying to make it in the 21st century," Shagg said, calling the borough's current phone system "ridiculous.
NEWS
July 27, 1997 | By Frank Greve and Matt Mossman, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Federal workers these days are, by and large, psyched to serve. They've got voice mail and fax-on-demand and more caller options than Detroit has car colors. But it can still be an ordeal trying to get a question answered. More than 30 million callers last year simply gave up, according to one government estimate. And that's considered an improvement. To experience what callers endure, two reporters put away the press credentials that earn them special treatment. Guided only by information operators, a standard phone directory, and the kindness of strangers in the bureaucracy, they started asking questions.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
You know what they say about those best-laid plans, and a guy named Jack knows, too. But he probably never expected that abandoning his car, climbing to the ledge of the Golden Gate Bridge and jumping would be thwarted by a woman named Sue. So there he is, in Richard Raskind's The Bridge Club - a curious and slightly spooky 70-minute one-act being given a world premiere at Society Hill Playhouse - about to jump. He calls his live-in girlfriend to say that his health situation is far worse than he let on and that he is taking his own life, and goodbye.
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | By PETER MUCHA
The true cause of the recession has not been noted on Wall Street Week. Or even on Entertainment Tonight. The Wall Street Journal hasn't noticed. Nor has Bryant Gumbel or Regis & Kathie Lee. The real culprit? Voice mail. Think about it. Two years ago, millions of people had jobs in the nation's four largest industries: manufacturing, banking, insurance and video rentals. They had lots of money to spend on taxes, slap bracelets, light trucks, lottery tickets, taxes, accountants, Nintendo, honey-roasted peanuts and 19 percent interest credit cards.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | by Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
"Hi! Welcome to the Philadelphia Daily News' story about computerized voice mail and automated telephone answering systems. "If you want to learn more about why voice mail makes you feel angry, press on. "To learn why businesses install automated systems anyway, push toward the end of the story. "To read this message again, push your eyes to the top of this column. If you have a rotary phone, please hold on. (We'll get to that, too). "Thank you. "(Click.)" There it is, perhaps the most audible proof that the Age of Aquarius has yielded place to the Brave New World: the disembodied computerized telephone voice.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mr. Stallins and his seventh graders are on the cutting edge. "I hope all my students enjoyed dissecting frogs last week," the science teacher told the parents of his seventh graders in a recorded message. "We dissected 112 frogs in less than six hours, and it was very exhausting but it was worth it. " No, it's not squeamish students slicing open frogs that's new. Rather, it's the school's hotline. The Inman Middle School is one of the pioneers in what some high-tech gurus are calling the latest telephone revolution.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 23, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
A longtime Trenton police officer and former mayor in Franklin Township, Gloucester County, died Wednesday following allegations he had brought a prostitute into a police building. The Trentonian, which reported the allegations and identified Ed Leopardi, said he had committed suicide at his home. Township officials confirmed his death and said they had canceled a committee meeting Wednesday evening out of respect for his family. "We ask that all residents of Franklin Township take this time to mourn Ed's passing and to take time to express their personal condolences to Ed's wife, Rene, and their family," a statement from the township committee said.
NEWS
August 22, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
Beyond a majestic set of gates on West Branch Avenue in Pine Hill, the road to the Trump National Golf Club Philadelphia rises to a manicured peak. The private club atop Camden County's highest point - Trump National's website calls it South Jersey's highest - is opulent, the view of the Center City skyline spectacular. But the blue-collar borough below - which owns the 365 acres where the beautiful course was built as a property-tax-exempt redevelopment project in the late 1990s - is barely visible from up there.
SPORTS
March 10, 2016 | By Dick Jerardi, STAFF WRITER
I TEXTED John Calipari not long after I heard that Drexel had told Bruiser Flint he was out as coach Monday morning. I asked if he wanted to talk about his longtime friend and colleague. The Kentucky coach got back to me Monday night, but I missed the call. He left a classic 80-second voice mail, an impassioned defense of Flint and a call to get rid of the graduate-transfer rule that allows players who have graduated with eligibility to go to another school without having to sit out a year.
NEWS
January 4, 2016
Joyce Eisenberg and Ellen Scolnic are known as the Word Mavens and are the authors of the "Dictionary of Jewish Words" Every now and then, we find ourselves asking questions that prove we're not as hip or as with it as we think we are. And undoubtedly, when our kids read this, they'll tell us that nobody says hip or with it anymore. We love new apps, gadgets, and conveniences, and we marvel at the things they can do, but we don't fully trust them. We spent decades dialing the phone, putting family photos in albums, and getting up from our chair to change the channel.
NEWS
September 30, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A FORMER Philadelphia police officer who was charged with making a false report and related offenses in a bizarre case that involved his wife has died, a prosecutor told a judge Tuesday. "Robert Penn is deceased," Assistant District Attorney Sybil Murphy told Municipal Judge William Austin Meehan Jr. on Tuesday, when Penn, 48, was scheduled to face a preliminary hearing. Murphy said afterward that she did not know the cause of Penn's death. A report from the Medical Examiner's Office indicated that Penn was pronounced dead at Nazareth Hospital, in Northeast Philadelphia, at 5:40 p.m. Sept.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO & VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writers difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
A PHILADELPHIA police officer who was shot outside his house last year was charged yesterday with allegedly trying to pin the blame on his estranged wife. Authorities say Robert Penn's wife was innocent of any wrongdoing. Someone shot Penn, 48, in the shoulder as he arrived home from work early March 2, 2014, outside the Overbrook Park rowhouse the couple, though estranged, still shared. As investigators chased dead ends and after the Daily News chronicled the mystery, Penn allegedly persuaded his friend, Charles Mays, to call the People Paper and implicate Penn's estranged wife, Jennifer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
Robin has a strategy for fielding strangers' queries about her son: She simply answers every question in the affirmative. "Is his father tall?" Yes. "He has so much hair! Did you have a lot of heartburn?" Yes. "Did you have a long labor?" Oh, you have no idea. She was in her mid-30s before she realized that pregnancy was not a prerequisite for parenting. "I never felt the urge to pop a human out of my body," she says. A genetic legacy wasn't important to her. But, increasingly, she longed to raise a child.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Only two people are known to have witnessed off-duty Moorestown Police Officer Craig Berner lose control of his motorcycle as the pickup truck approached. One of them is Patrolman Berner, who's dead. The other is Sgt. William McGovern, the off-duty Burlington County detective who ran over Berner on a dark stretch of Westfield Road in Moorestown. McGovern isn't talking, and an investigation by the Camden County Prosecutor's Office was concluded without any criminal charges being filed.
SPORTS
March 12, 2014 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
BALTIMORE - It's a good thing that Delaware men's basketball coach Monte' Ross coach decided to check his voice mail. Ross received a call Monday morning from a number he did not recognize. Then he played the voice mail and it was a person calling on behalf of Vice President Biden, who wanted to wish him good luck. Ross called back and was connected with Biden. "We talked for a few minutes and it was great," Ross said about an hour before Monday's Colonial Athletic Association championship against William and Mary at the Baltimore Arena.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
ON JAN. 23, I called the main number of the Philadelphia Sheriff's Office and asked to be connected to the Real Estate Department, which handles sales of foreclosed and tax-delinquent properties. I had been phoning the department's direct number, but it repeatedly rang and then disconnected. "There's no one in real estate today," explained the woman who answered my call. "They're all at the sheriff's sale. " "Is there someone I can talk to for just a minute?" I asked. "No one's there," she repeated.
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